Viking Sky emergency - Page 4 - Ships Nostalgia
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Viking Sky emergency

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  #76  
Old 27th March 2019, 00:27
Stephen J. Card's Avatar
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Originally Posted by skilly57 View Post
With pax talking of feeling a 'Shudder' before the propulsion failure - I wonder of she had rolled far enough to lift one prop partially out of the water? =

The shudder would be very unlikely to be an engine shutting down as most modern diesel-electric installations have the engines resiliently mounted to reduce the vibes through the hull and the passengers wine glasses!

Skilly



My 'engine' failed this morning. No shudder, just quietly died. Less than 100 yards from the work shop. Pushed to get there and Carlos came to help. I long brush... a piece oh 1/4 inch dia wire. Stick one in the chuck of an electric drill. Stuck it up the pipe of the muffler and within two minutes all was clear. The cost was a six pack of coke. Always make friends with a mechanic!

But you are right, the ships would have simply stopped. Probably the less of engine sound and vibration and you would hear and feel every wave that hits the hull. And that was when the captain and the bosun threw the anchor overboard!
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  #77  
Old 27th March 2019, 02:12
skilly57 skilly57 is offline  
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Had to laugh when I saw that statement from one of the escaping passengers! "The captain and the bosun threw the anchor overboard"!

I had visions of three 'Pop Eyes' straining all their muscles to heave an 8 ton pick over the rail!

Cheers
Skilly
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  #78  
Old 28th March 2019, 05:16
skilly57 skilly57 is offline  
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Well, I have to commend the investigation results - they haven't tried to hide the cause. Low Oil Pressure!

With the heavy rolling, and the engine oil tanks apparently not containing enough oil, the engines shut down on low oil pressure protection when the oil pumps sucked air!

I guess when you have cruise ships that always attempt to avoid rough weather for the benefit of the walking cargo, it also means when you do finally get exposed to a bit of 'Ruffers', you are going to learn something new about your ship's systems!

On every vessel I have ever worked on, there was always the possibility of getting into rough weather, so all oil sumps/sump tanks were always maintained at the FULL or max level for this very reason. It always meant you had a bit of leeway in the event of a purifier failure or cooler leakage problem.

Skilly
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  #79  
Old 28th March 2019, 13:01
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Varley Varley is offline   SN Supporter
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B annoying to have two threads going. I have just pontificated on the other so will not repeat it here.
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  #80  
Old 28th March 2019, 23:38
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It has been reported that the reason for all four engines to stop was low cooling oil levels. If and why they really had low levels have not been reported yet.
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  #81  
Old 29th March 2019, 07:39
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B annoying to have two threads going. I have just pontificated on the other so will not repeat it here.
You must be sickening for something because pontificating on multiple threads has never bothered you before.
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  #82  
Old 29th March 2019, 10:14
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When I cast pearls before swine I like them all to have a good chance of being hit by one.
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  #83  
Old 29th March 2019, 13:51
John CHS John CHS is offline  
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The "Viking Sky" miss-hap should be raising a lot of questions. I know nothing about the design of this type of ship but it seems to me that nothing has been learned from the "Costa Concordia". This latest incident has made one thing perfectly clear - at least to me., and that is, ships of this design and construction, should they find themselves in an "Abandon Ship" scenario, are disasters waiting to happen.
With access to lifeboats being possible only through the accommodation, and then only through a limited number of exits, it beggars the thought of what would be the situation if a fire was to occur in the accommodation, particularly on the "Lifeboat Deck" itself.
And by the way, I know I've been "out-the-game" a while, but, why was it necessary to lift off passengers with helicopters? Aren't lifeboats supposed to be "launchable" even in "Dead Ship" situation.
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  #84  
Old 29th March 2019, 15:39
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When I cast pearls before swine I like them all to have a good chance of being hit by one.
Well said, sir!

Howard
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  #85  
Old 31st March 2019, 16:12
blindkiwi blindkiwi is offline  
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Thank you Ombugge.

By trying "the other place" (gcaptain) I finally managed to get a sensible reply to my query regarding how the passengers were chosen who would form the next "flight" when evacuating large numbers of pax by means of winch line to a hovering chopper. Apparently they were chosen by a "raffle" system of cabin numbers, with option to decline, and the poster suspects this is not an "official" system. Thank you Ombugge.

I am now going to start a separate thread on helicopters and cruise ships.
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  #86  
Old 31st March 2019, 17:16
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Originally Posted by John CHS View Post
The "Viking Sky" miss-hap should be raising a lot of questions. I know nothing about the design of this type of ship but it seems to me that nothing has been learned from the "Costa Concordia". This latest incident has made one thing perfectly clear - at least to me., and that is, ships of this design and construction, should they find themselves in an "Abandon Ship" scenario, are disasters waiting to happen.
With access to lifeboats being possible only through the accommodation, and then only through a limited number of exits, it beggars the thought of what would be the situation if a fire was to occur in the accommodation, particularly on the "Lifeboat Deck" itself.
And by the way, I know I've been "out-the-game" a while, but, why was it necessary to lift off passengers with helicopters? Aren't lifeboats supposed to be "launchable" even in "Dead Ship" situation.
John,

Your posting is all backwards! You know the correct answers to all of your questions. The real question is, why do designers and safety people get away with the obvious that many of us already know!

No safe for passengers to go for embarkation. Everyone stays in lounges until you are called... unless your fire zone is not 'on fire'.

30 minutes to evacuate a boat. Take more than that just to get people to the lounge for a head count.

The boats today do NOT have gravity davits. They have 'stored' hydraulic ram to move davits.

The embarkation areas are mostly 'partly enclosed'. Any fire anywhere near an embarkation area is going to kill with flames and smoke.

Put 150 or more passengers in enclosed boats. Ever been in these boats used as tenders to shore? A tender purpose the boats do not take the full capacity.... more like 75% or less. Fill those boats and enclosed then on a calm sunny day in the Caribbean and they will die of heat!

The food on the new boats are horrible!

Stephen
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  #87  
Old 31st March 2019, 17:18
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Originally Posted by blindkiwi View Post
By trying "the other place" (gcaptain) I finally managed to get a sensible reply to my query regarding how the passengers were chosen who would form the next "flight" when evacuating large numbers of pax by means of winch line to a hovering chopper. Apparently they were chosen by a "raffle" system of cabin numbers, with option to decline, and the poster suspects this is not an "official" system. Thank you Ombugge.

I am now going to start a separate thread on helicopters and cruise ships.
They take the numbers in the List of Crew.

001 Captain
002 Staff Captain
003 Chief Officer

etc.

3,999.... You!
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  #88  
Old 31st March 2019, 22:59
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... why was it necessary to lift off passengers with helicopters? Aren't lifeboats supposed to be "launchable" even in "Dead Ship" situation.
Did you see any of the video showing the helicopter evacuation? In those conditions you would have had to tie me up and carry me into a lifeboat. I would have chosen to take my chances with the ship rather than risk being launched into such sea conditions on a lee coast.
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  #89  
Old 1st April 2019, 02:10
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The nine man crew of cargo ship that lost power at the same time in the same bay, all had to jump into the water for the helicopter crew to pick them up.
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  #90  
Old 1st April 2019, 09:43
John CHS John CHS is offline  
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Did you see any of the video showing the helicopter evacuation? In those conditions you would have had to tie me up and carry me into a lifeboat. I would have chosen to take my chances with the ship rather than risk being launched into such sea conditions on a lee coast.
Tend to agree with you.... only once in my life did I have the Dubious pleasure of being winched down on to a ship on the rocks of Southern Africa and then up.... never again....
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  #91  
Old 1st April 2019, 11:07
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The nine man crew of cargo ship that lost power at the same time in the same bay, all had to jump into the water for the helicopter crew to pick them up.
Perhaps with survival suits safer, Stein?
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  #92  
Old 1st April 2019, 11:48
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Perhaps with survival suits safer, Stein?
Yes, I did not think of that, survival suits is something a bit too modern for me. When I posted that I had just heard the captain interviewed on television, speaking of a little fear just before jumping.
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  #93  
Old 1st April 2019, 12:35
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1,300 survival suits with enough sizes to fit all. Small ship too. What if you have 6,000 pax and 2,000 crew?

They like to say that the best lifeboat is the ship herself. Perhaps. Unless it is on fire or heading to the reefs.

Do you think the lifejacket under your seat on a Boeing aircraft is going to help?
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  #94  
Old 1st April 2019, 13:02
stein stein is offline  
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I own a reprint of a WW2 book called "How to abandon ship," with this to say on the life wests of the time: "... scarcely more of a safety device than a straight jacket." And with this advice: "Provide yourself with a life-suit, it will protect you against cold (...) and all but eliminate the possibilty of death from exposure." And according to reports of the torpedoed tanker "Barfonn", the men who had jumped into the water with life suits on "...were floating around in trhe water like rubber balls and could easily swim and advance with good speed."

So what I said about survival suits being too modern for me is perhaps a claim needing some moderation. Wholly true though is the claim that I never heard of either life-suits or survival-suits when I was at sea in the sixties.

Last edited by stein; 1st April 2019 at 13:10..
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  #95  
Old 1st April 2019, 13:08
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Stephen, you didn't catch the point. The cargo ship helicopter rescue might have been done that way (into the water first and then hoisted from there) because survival suits would have been available. As you point out unlikely that the passenger vessel had them.

Peter Eccleson would disagree having used one in anger (not a distress but a radio room catastrophe) but the lifeboat radio of old was more use to take the minds off one's likely fate than summoning assistance. On Tilapa immediately before paying off during a dockers strike in 72 I rigged the set on the bridge wing in sight of Niton's aerial farm and tried, with no success, to raise them on MF. On Alvand the Sparkie was rather disconcerted to find the super qualified to use 'his' radio room when he was dispatched in the lifeboat during a drill. We certainly heard one another but then we could have shouted just as well.
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  #96  
Old 1st April 2019, 19:26
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Though not seen in this shot, I did rig the lifeboat set during our 'trip' around the bay, and even remembered to throw the earth over the side. It was the yellow cube Solas set, but can't remember a name. This was at anchor off Port Stanvac, and I called VIA who replied with a good QSA. I think VIA was somewhere near McLaren Vale so maybe 5 miles away. I was quite pleased with the result.

David
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  #97  
Old 1st April 2019, 20:24
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Stephen, you didn't catch the point. The cargo ship helicopter rescue might have been done that way (into the water first and then hoisted from there) because survival suits would have been available. As you point out unlikely that the passenger vessel had them.

.


I'm trying to remember the clip on BBC. I think the crew went forward to the foscle and they were lifted from there, not from the sea. They would have needed the survival suits because the ship was getting ready to sink.

Stein may have seen it and know what happened.
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  #98  
Old 1st April 2019, 21:30
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I have searched for a video or some photos of he rescue of the crew from Hagland Captain, but all I have found was a single picture taken from the helicopter. Looks dramatic, but I can see no men. A bit down on this page from Norwegian tabloid "Verdens Gang":https://www.vg.no/nyheter/innenriks/...t-var-alvorlig

According to the text water got in through engine air vents, causing a total blackout and loss of all systems. They got a reserve aggregate going, but with a heavy list and some damage to the steering engine, she would not steer properly. And the captain eventually ordered his men into survival suits. It was the helicopter crew that ordered them to jump into the water, and the reason for this was that the ship was making such large movements that it would be dangerous for tre helicopter crew to pick them up from deck. (The deckload of timber that had become loose might perhaps been considered as a factor to bee considered?)

PS: "Air vents, water, blackout", this I am just translating. I have been down in the engine room to ask for " water on deck" and to ask the repair man to do some welding on things we had broken upstairs, but the only thing I learned on these ocassions was that there was no need to yell.

Last edited by stein; 1st April 2019 at 21:45..
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