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  #51  
Old 22nd April 2019, 23:50
dannic dannic is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lancslad View Post
On a cruise liner I worked on in the 1970's, the emergency generator was a Deutz diesel with a battery starter. If that failed there was a canister on #1 cylinder. The process was to bar the engine over until #1 was just past TDC. We put a roll of cellulose movie film in the can followed by a lighted Bengal match. Shut the valve on top and wait for the engine to turn over and start. Worked every time!!
Aframax crude oil tanker, emergency gen room was on main deck level, just aft of cargo deck - same emergency start system, (koffman starter?) so to be standing near cargo tanks with big long matches and cellulose film never a good idea!!
Dannic.
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  #52  
Old 23rd April 2019, 00:06
sternchallis sternchallis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Varley View Post
Does that not bring to question which end, then, would (would have been) 'headed'.
The headed end.
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  #53  
Old 23rd April 2019, 03:52
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YM-Mundrabilla YM-Mundrabilla is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sternchallis View Post
The headed end.
As a railwayman, we always put locomotives on the head end.
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  #54  
Old 23rd April 2019, 06:48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YM-Mundrabilla View Post
Is 'stud iron' what us ill informed amateurs would call 'running thread' here in Oz?

ie a 'headless' rod threaded for its entire length?
I always heard it called it 'thread bar' , I remember buying it in up to 3 metre lengths of 12mm dia thread bar for use as tie down rods attached as an extension to the bottom plate holding down bolts up through the dwangs or nogs to the top plate to hold timber framing firmly down in severe wind. This was a code requirement in Brisbane in early 2000 when I worked on Son in law's house . A requirement after the Darwin hurricane . We are not that sophisticated here yet !

Bob
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  #55  
Old 23rd April 2019, 10:00
Engine Serang Engine Serang is online now  
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The Regent Falcon had a Paxman generator in the shaft tunnel and not only was it never started, it was never spoken about.
Veni, Vidi, I gave up.
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  #56  
Old 23rd April 2019, 10:56
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Varley Varley is offline   SN Supporter
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But what of your education? How would you know how many oil drums a Paxman fits in if you have never seen one taken apart.
Frequently tranmslated phrases:

"Put a shaft generator 'on' and pass the spanners".

"I can see the rotor of the Napier blower through the casing"

"In loving memory of Percy. R. Paxman, after a short illness bravely born. His light was with us. Briefly"
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  #57  
Old 23rd April 2019, 14:15
skilly57 skilly57 is offline  
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One of two Paxman 8RPHCZ generators, built 1978, survey photos from July 2016, and still going strong today, with life envisaged to last another 8-9 years! If the head studs stay in the blocks!

Quite remarkable reliability, don't burn much oil. The world's oldest operational Paxman is hiding in an old power station in Marlborough, New Zealand, and still gets run up monthly too!

Skilly

WOW! I did downsize the photos too!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 2866_Paxman 8RPHCZ.jpg (250.9 KB, 39 views)
File Type: jpg 2869_Pistons back in +new rings & brgs.jpg (231.8 KB, 29 views)
File Type: jpg 2873_B.E. brg for fork & blade rod.jpg (276.0 KB, 28 views)
File Type: jpg 2874_LH side.jpg (288.3 KB, 34 views)
File Type: jpg 2875_Underview with sump off.jpg (266.7 KB, 35 views)

Last edited by skilly57; 23rd April 2019 at 14:17..
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  #58  
Old 23rd April 2019, 16:01
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makko makko is offline  
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The problem with the Paxmans emergency generators on the Blue Funnel Super P class was that some dimwit had bought engines that ran at 1800 rpm and generators that operated at 3600 rpm. There were two viable options: downgrade the gennnys bought or buy new ones.

The "fix" from India Buildings was simple: Run the engines at 3600 rpm!!!!

The failures were often and spectacular and in many cabins, the bar and saloon of Super P ships had very decorative and heavy table lamps made from expulsed pistons with twisted conn rods.

I only sailed on the Phrontis for two months. We would fire the Paxmans up once a week but only the time required to run up to operating temperature and pressure. They were located, if memory serves, up by the boat deck and starters, breakers etc. were in an separate compartment known as the emergency control room.

The first time I went up with the second, he explained that I should never be in the compartment when the engines were started and then pointed out the 3/4" plate cladding on the bulkhead to protect the operator, in the emergency CR, during start up and running.

Lucky me, I never saw one go up in smoke for real! But, then there WAS the Yanmar............which "liberated" a piston!!!

Rgds.
Dave
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  #59  
Old 23rd April 2019, 16:16
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Ron Stringer Ron Stringer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by makko View Post
The problem with the Paxmans emergency generators on the Blue Funnel Super P class was that some dimwit had bought engines that ran at 1800 rpm and generators that operated at 3600 rpm.
Surely not at Alfred Holt's! I was led to believe (including by many posters on SN) that paragon of British shipping could do no wrong.
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  #60  
Old 23rd April 2019, 17:56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Stringer View Post
Surely not at Alfred Holt's! I was led to believe (including by many posters on SN) that paragon of British shipping could do no wrong.
Even Homer nods. But he did make some great names for ships.
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  #61  
Old 23rd April 2019, 21:05
OilJiver OilJiver is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skilly57 View Post
One of two Paxman 8RPHCZ generators, built 1978, survey photos from July 2016, and still going strong today, with life envisaged to last another 8-9 years! If the head studs stay in the blocks!.....
Great pics Skilly, thanks. I had more trouble with Cyl Block/CC studs shearing than head studs.
1200 rpm plenty for one of those things in my book.
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  #62  
Old 23rd April 2019, 21:28
jmirvine jmirvine is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmer John View Post
One of the old tractors, I think i was the Field Marshall, started with a blank 12 bore cartridge, I think. I bet someone on here has one.
Plenty videos on you tube

Last edited by jmirvine; 23rd April 2019 at 21:33..
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  #63  
Old 23rd April 2019, 22:56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmirvine View Post
Plenty videos on you tube
Somebody sent me this link.

video here -

but when I read their post, they had edited it out.
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  #64  
Old 27th April 2019, 20:31
jmirvine jmirvine is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmer John View Post
Somebody sent me this link.

video here -
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VEurohAwrmA

but when I read their post, they had edited it out.
I edited it out because it doesn't effin' work!!
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  #65  
Old 27th April 2019, 21:09
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Try it again, it works fine for me.

Thank you.
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  #66  
Old 27th April 2019, 21:12
Dartskipper Dartskipper is offline  
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Coffman cartridge starting always had a reputation for something spectacular happening, or not. They were standard equipment on the horrendously unreliable 24 cylinder Napier Sabre aero engines used in Hawker Typhoons and Tempests. One Typhoon was well known due to the message written on the forward air intake informing the ground crew not to jump up and down and wave their hands at the pilot if the engine caught fire, but to try and put the aforementioned fire out. Photos of these aircraft at dispersal often show an extinguisher handily located, hanging from one of the nearby Oerlikon cannon in the wing.
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  #67  
Old 29th April 2019, 19:44
ALBY2 ALBY2 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skilly57 View Post
One of two Paxman 8RPHCZ generators, built 1978, survey photos from July 2016, and still going strong today, with life envisaged to last another 8-9 years! If the head studs stay in the blocks!

Quite remarkable reliability, don't burn much oil. The world's oldest operational Paxman is hiding in an old power station in Marlborough, New Zealand, and still gets run up monthly too!

Skilly

WOW! I did downsize the photos too!
Wow indeed what great photos, they bring back a lot of memories good and bad, but you are lucky being able to drop the sump, on all the paxmans I sailed with, on BP tankers, we had to feed the piston in through the small man hole doors in the side of the crank case. My knuckles are hurting just thinking about it
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  #68  
Old 29th April 2019, 20:55
OilJiver OilJiver is offline  
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Yes Alby – bit of cunning required when dropping them out through the CC, and again when putting them back. (But maybe not that bad once done a couple of times).

Fuel pump timing also referenced via CC with that poker gauge…..
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  #69  
Old 3rd May 2019, 22:02
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Steve Oatey Steve Oatey is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ALBY2 View Post
Wow indeed what great photos, they bring back a lot of memories good and bad, but you are lucky being able to drop the sump, on all the paxmans I sailed with, on BP tankers, we had to feed the piston in through the small man hole doors in the side of the crank case. My knuckles are hurting just thinking about it
The Paxman manual says something about "turn the engine upside down" for major crankcase work. Good luck with that!
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  #70  
Old 3rd May 2019, 23:16
OilJiver OilJiver is offline  
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No - never did turn one upside down. But inside out? plenty.
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  #71  
Old 4th May 2019, 22:36
dannic dannic is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by makko View Post
The problem with the Paxmans emergency generators on the Blue Funnel Super P class was that some dimwit had bought engines that ran at 1800 rpm and generators that operated at 3600 rpm. There were two viable options: downgrade the gennnys bought or buy new ones.

The "fix" from India Buildings was simple: Run the engines at 3600 rpm!!!!

The failures were often and spectacular and in many cabins, the bar and saloon of Super P ships had very decorative and heavy table lamps made from expulsed pistons with twisted conn rods.

I only sailed on the Phrontis for two months. We would fire the Paxmans up once a week but only the time required to run up to operating temperature and pressure. They were located, if memory serves, up by the boat deck and starters, breakers etc. were in an separate compartment known as the emergency control room.

The first time I went up with the second, he explained that I should never be in the compartment when the engines were started and then pointed out the 3/4" plate cladding on the bulkhead to protect the operator, in the emergency CR, during start up and running.

Lucky me, I never saw one go up in smoke for real! But, then there WAS the Yanmar............which "liberated" a piston!!!

Rgds.
Dave
A bit like Port Line and Rolls Royce DV8 main generators - normal revs 1500 but to get 60 Hz needed to run at 1800 rpm! so they destroyed themselves on a regular basis. Also they were initially to be on an exchange basis but that didnt last either!
Dannic
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  #72  
Old 6th May 2019, 15:39
skilly57 skilly57 is offline  
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Alby, the yard installed the Paxmans on the generator flat with a large engine-sized opening in the deck plate underneath each machine. There was a drainable drip tray fitted over this hole, which was easily removed when required. In the photos, the sump was removed by lowering down through this opening - it had developed a crack & needed repairs anyway, but also gives far better access to the c'shaft & bearings when not in the way.
The first survey we did on the first Paxman back around 1985 or 86 we had 3-foot high legs made (they fitted in between the bedplate & the resilient engine mounts) so we could lift the engines up, slide the legs in, and lower it onto them. This entailed uncoupling the Lawrence-Scott electromotive generator first.
This method lifted the c'case to a nice working height, but meant removing a lot of associated pipework, and also put the heads too high to work on.

The legs and the deck holes were the result of finding how awkward the V4 RPH Paxmans were to work with on a previous, smaller cement ship, the dev Ligar Bay.
Cheers,
Skilly
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  #73  
Old 6th May 2019, 18:03
OilJiver OilJiver is offline  
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I think sump cracks a fairly common defect in RPH engines Skilly. But whether cracks present or not, a full size “drainable drip tray” beneficial under any Paxman.
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  #74  
Old 6th May 2019, 22:28
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Tell that to Jeremy.
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  #75  
Old 7th May 2019, 09:15
OilJiver OilJiver is offline  
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I’m not the biggest fan of the machines John. But still have more regard for them than for the overrated person you refer to.
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