Drinking on Merchant ships - Page 3 - Ships Nostalgia
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Drinking on Merchant ships

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  #51  
Old 22nd January 2013, 18:18
oldseamerchant oldseamerchant is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ninabaker View Post
I can't decide if this is intended to be deliberately offensive or is tongue-in-cheek. In either case, not that funny and an insult to the many women who have worked/are working at sea in a professional manner. Absolutely perfect behaviour is of course not the preserve of any gender nor any profession but on the whole I do not recognise anything in what you allege.
Good response Nina to a totally unnecessary post.
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  #52  
Old 25th January 2013, 15:15
andyp1 andyp1 is offline
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I sailed with Shell in the early 80's, as a cadet & 5/E on big ones- L class and not so big - A class.
UMS on the modern ships lent itself to a reasonable bar life, with moderate consumption of beer on individual tabs, however a steady run of 10 beers / night would bring a "gentle word" from 2/E. Cadets were allowed beer only, unless a kindly senior stood you a measure on their tab. Purchase from the bond was allowed and most cabins (inc cadets) had a fridge that could hold 2* cases beer + 2 bottles wine, so most weekday evenings there was a wind down beer after work before getting showered and ready for dinner. Private orders via the chief steward going past cape town resulted in a steady 2 weeks of bucks fizz all round, with a King Edward Imperial (box 50 £5) the cigar of choice! But as previous posters have put- the job came first and woe betide anyone that missed and engineers general alarm. Sundays brought the free beers from the Dutch Royal Family - rounded up to a 4 pack per month. As a cadet I met with most of the female cadets shell had at that time at college, they worked hard & played hard. Wives had a "civilising effect", with the exception of 1 who was an alcoholic.
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  #53  
Old 25th January 2013, 16:01
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is offline  
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#41

Well said, Nina!

#35 was completely uncalled-for.
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  #54  
Old 25th January 2013, 17:34
Robert Bush Robert Bush is offline  
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Drinking and Women on ships. I am in favor of them. Moderation in all things

That rules out alcoholics and those who "cannot hold their booze."

Wives are nearly all good in my experience and some were a great asset. However a company I worked for allowed only two. The seniority of their husbands did not matter. The company's view was that with more than two the strong ones would gang up on the weaker one, and that had caused trouble on some ships.

Never sailed with female crew but have seen them on Russian and Scandinavian ships, mostly R/Os and stewardesses.

One Norwegian Master who I asked what had happened to all the Norwegian female crew members his company used to have told me that the company found that they did not stay at sea either getting pregnant or for some other reason, and the money spent on training them was wasted. They stopped employing them.
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  #55  
Old 25th January 2013, 18:13
David Paterson David Paterson is offline  
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Drinking on board Merchant Navy Ships

When I first went to sea I was an R/O on trawlers out of Fleetwood,When we left the dock most of the crew had just left the pub and were in various states of sobriety ...The time in dock between trips of 3 weeks was a minimum of 60 hours ,so you had to make the most of it. Once we cleared the UK waters the bond was opened so everyone got 2 daily drams of rum ( chalice and Stern 4 bells) was the usual tipple, Cans of beer could be bought from the bond....in 1962 Rum was 4/6 a bottle Whisky (chivas Regal) 10/6 beer was a pound a case 24 cans..Cigs were 4/6 for 200 and pipe and rolling tobacco was a pound a pound...Not bad eh! The R/O did the bond bills for the crew. When I sailed from Hull on tugs any new ship sailing from Hull was gifted several cases of Hull Brewery Export Beer as some sort of advertising feature. It was very rare to see anyone drunk..The room was actually spinning round. On the ocean going tug they carried a full bond if you were foreign going.
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  #56  
Old 30th January 2013, 15:54
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As we strayed into wives at sea, generally a calming influence in the bar, but most had the decency to depart if the lads were going to Hang one on as they say.
Believe the worst problem I saw was with a J/E's wife who spent most of her time in the 2nd. cooks cabin when hubby was on watch, caused a deal of friction, in particular when it was suggested that if she was thrown off, all wives would go, not impressed with that one. Believe her father was a cook with the company.
From a chum of mine on container ships, the 3/E had his wife with him, she wore a gold ankle chain, cabin steward was making up the 4/E bunk, and what should he find but the said ankle chain. LOL

On drinking, I was running the bar, and was told by the chief steward that we were to be restricted on our beer carry, reason, there had been trouble in the crew bar so he had restricted them, and as he did not have the balls to sort things out correctly we were restricted as well. Impressive command decission that one.

2G

Last edited by twogrumpy; 30th January 2013 at 16:01..
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  #57  
Old 30th January 2013, 16:30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twogrumpy View Post
From a chum of mine on container ships, the 3/E had his wife with him, she wore a gold ankle chain, cabin steward was making up the 4/E bunk, and what should he find but the said ankle chain.
2G
A sort of reverse privilege of rank perhaps? Couldn't be something else, surely?
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  #58  
Old 30th January 2013, 21:41
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Originally Posted by twogrumpy View Post
As we strayed into wives at sea, generally a calming influence in the bar, but most had the decency to depart if the lads were going to Hang one on as they say.
2G
I enjoyed when wives were onboard as it added a bit of variety to the routine. The only time there was a problem was precisely as above - A good sesh, I forget the reason, Master's b'day or something. One of the wives who was in the habit of sitting in the bar all the time complained to the C/E about the "off colour" jokes, rude, no disgusting banter and generally deplorable, expletive riddled language. She was taken aside and given a quiet word about "work hard, play hard" and that it was called the Officer's Bar for a reason. After that she relaxed, fitted right in and turned out to be a good laugh and socially a team player!

My wife claimed she got seasick in port and refused to make even an overnight passage (US West Coast SF-LA). Shame really..........
Rgds.
Dave
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  #59  
Old 30th January 2013, 21:41
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Good of the steward to be so discreet about the ankle chain.

JohnT
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  #60  
Old 30th January 2013, 22:44
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We all used to drink a bit ; now sadly we spill most of it .
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  #61  
Old 1st August 2020, 19:00
adrianvare adrianvare is offline  
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Talking

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Originally Posted by graymay View Post
I could not imagine the Kiwi Coast without a bar, especially when the bars onshore closed so early in the evenings!

Can anyone remember the British Bar in Lyttleton or Chicks bar in Port Chalmers?
Bistro bar in Wellington . close 6pm , que for taxi with cases of beer , party at some birds house , or back to ship to partyHit every wall in British bar .
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  #62  
Old 2nd August 2020, 00:14
dannic dannic is offline  
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UK officers union newspaper today says "50 years ago" Texaco Overseas and Benline were opening talks about having bars onboard their vessels, along with Haines Nourse! Pleased I joined a bit later when all ships I sailed on until last 20 years had bar!!
Dannic
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  #63  
Old 2nd August 2020, 03:05
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Originally Posted by dannic View Post
UK officers union newspaper today says "50 years ago" Texaco Overseas and Benline were opening talks about having bars onboard their vessels, along with Haines Nourse! Pleased I joined a bit later when all ships I sailed on until last 20 years had bar!!
Dannic
There was a theory at the time that having a bar would bring drinking out into the open and out of wardrobes, etc. People had been making their own bars in the smokeroom for quite a while before it became official.

All a thing of the past now, I believe. Is it true you have to be a Vegan to go to sea nowadays?

John T
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  #64  
Old 2nd August 2020, 09:13
P.Arnold P.Arnold is offline
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Canberra Star 1971, had just been kitted out with a bar, in the smoke room, by Watneys with bar, optics, cooler and pumps.
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  #65  
Old 2nd August 2020, 11:00
tom roberts tom roberts is online now  
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Originally Posted by P.Arnold View Post
Canberra Star 1971, had just been kitted out with a bar, in the smoke room, by Watneys with bar, optics, cooler and pumps.
It had to be a southern ship with Watneys my god such a load of crap was it their red barrel ugh,another horror was hop leaf I think I had it on C.P.R.by far the best in crew bars on the Cunard was Wrexham Lager which I believe is the oldest brewed in the UK if I am wrong no doubt one of our experts among us old timers will let me know,I may have posted before but on the Reina Del Mar leaving Colon us after gang all with raging hangovers letting go were treated by a saint she was the mother of a lass I was having a liasion with as was another A.B.with her mother who on seeing our plight came up with a tray of Barcleys beer ice cold I can still see them with the condensation running down the sides of the bottles I will remember for the test of my days I wonder if any of us still alive remember her with the reverence I do.Whilst we are on the subject of booze on ships who was the best home brewer of hooch you sailed with,on the Hyria we had an A.B.from the Isle of Man who was the most accomplished I ever knew and his brews were very palatable the cook kept him supplied with all the ingredients he needed how the old man on his rounds didn't smell the stuff,so come on let's know who you remember.
Stay Safe and remember those less fortunate than us.Tom Roberts.u
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  #66  
Old 2nd August 2020, 12:21
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In the early 1960s with Shell we varied between Amstel, Heineken and Tuborg.
With Ellermans, mainly there was Alsopp's Double Diamond or Tennent's Thistle lager but on a couple of voyages we had Charrington's Toby Ale - truly dreadful - and aneer from Hull Brewery which was almost as bad. Lacking any air-con, in the case of those latter two beers it was probably all to the good that most of the contents of the can or bottle gushed out on opening and were lost.
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  #67  
Old 2nd August 2020, 13:00
Engine Serang Engine Serang is offline  
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Is it true you have to be a Vegan to go to sea nowadays?

John T
Yes. And it helps if you are a lesbian.
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  #68  
Old 2nd August 2020, 13:01
P.Arnold P.Arnold is offline
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#65 Red Barrel it was. It didn’t travel well. Bar committee, excluding OM, C/E and C/Stwd, decided to ‘free’ issue lime juice splash, to get rid of the beer, so we could have the kegs refilled on Aussie coast.
Not sure, but think Swan Lager, did the filling. Fosters, 4X and others wouldn’t consider the idea. Anyway, whoever it was, we got extra fittings for the bar, plus a few “free” cases of lager
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  #69  
Old 2nd August 2020, 13:11
Michael Taylor Michael Taylor is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Stringer View Post
In the early 1960s with Shell we varied between Amstel, Heineken and Tuborg.
With Ellermans, mainly there was Alsopp's Double Diamond or Tennent's Thistle lager but on a couple of voyages we had Charrington's Toby Ale - truly dreadful - and aneer from Hull Brewery which was almost as bad. Lacking any air-con, in the case of those latter two beers it was probably all to the good that most of the contents of the can or bottle gushed out on opening and were lost.
Ron you are correct about that Hull beer it was truly awful but you have to remember that Sir John I believe owned the Brewery.
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  #70  
Old 2nd August 2020, 13:12
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Naess Pioneer, 1970. Myself and John Cook, both first trippers. The Mate put us up to work 'fixing' the bar. The ship had two dining rooms, the upper was never used. The lower was used for dining.

The unused space was gutted... the four large table went overboard. A table tennis table was provided. Painted out etc. The small 'captain's lounge' was repainted, added the fridge, optics etc, nice easy chairs. A good space. The deck outside... chipped, painted, added deck chairs. Needed an awning. By the end of that I was master at sewing canvas! Final touch, the name of the bar... The Navel Club. My 'art' on the glass door panel.

New master joined, Captain A. Smart. First lunch at sea, drinks in the bar. The OM went to the Mate, "Those two first trippers were drinking in the bar!" The Mate says, "They are the two that built it." The OM say, "Yes, but they are first trippers, they are both underage and they were drinking PINK GINS!!!!!" The smokes and the 'Old Port' mini cigars didn't help!
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  #71  
Old 2nd August 2020, 13:39
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"...you have to remember that Sir John I believe owned the Brewery"

We were also told that he had money in Charrington's. That trip Toby Ale was particularly unwelcome because we went down to South Africa (too short a trip to justify restocking), Cape Town, PE, Durban with the bond sealed but no problem, plenty of Lion and Castle ashore. Then LM and Beira where we anchored off for yonks with only Toby Ale. From there in ballast to the East coast ports of India (not Calcutta) and up to swing at the pick for best part of a month in Chalna. Still with bloody Toby.
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  #72  
Old 2nd August 2020, 15:36
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Hadn't spotted this thread before! I must have been away working when this thread was running? Following all the posts I'm surprised that no one has mentioned that in 1990, Drug & Alcohol Guidelines were introduced across the global tanker sector. These not only limited alcohol consumption onboard, laid down strict limitations on the maximum blood/alcohol level permitted (0.40) and introduced unannounced testing of seafarers for both alcolhol and drugs. Over the intervening 30 years this has become the accepted norm and most tankers are dry ships! Perhaps of interest that these day it is rare to hear of drink or drugs being a problem that arises on tankers. My experience over the past 18 years on a wide variety of vessels in all sectors, other than passenger/cruise, is that in most other sectors the policy is for dry ships and this is accepted. I have only come across one vessel during this time with an operating bar and this was an ex P&O capesize bulker!
Cheers. Chris
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  #73  
Old 2nd August 2020, 16:48
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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#67 .
"Is it true you have to be a Vegan to go to sea nowadays?

John T

Yes. And it helps if you are a lesbian."

Blimey, everyone will be ordering coir mats for lunch!

John T
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