American Cargo Ship ‘El Faro’ Missing with 33 Crew - Page 4 - Ships Nostalgia
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American Cargo Ship ‘El Faro’ Missing with 33 Crew

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  #76  
Old 5th October 2015, 17:36
billshaver billshaver is offline  
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one body in a survival suit & a destroyed lifeboat says much...were able to get a boat away..& get in suits.....eitherway..its deplorable ..their last miniutes....winds like that...forces are unbelivable ..had a twister come in western ontario once, out in field with a big tractor & cultivator...i stayed in the cab, seatbelts on, storm fliiped the tractor, broke the tongue on equip, needed jaws of life to get me out of thecab..tractor was done...but the force..cant remember much still but being woke up bu the fireman prying open the cab door with the jaws...this was years ago, made me see what nature really was...unbelivable force....i was just lucky they told me..sorry to hear the crew from the el faro.....was not...
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  #77  
Old 5th October 2015, 20:06
Klaatu83 Klaatu83 is offline  
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"...were able to get a boat away..."

I can't imagine that they could have launched a lifeboat in those weather and sea conditions, more likely it broke loose when the ship sank. This was an old ship, built in the mid 1970s, and had two of the old-fashioned open lifeboats on gravity davits, one on each side of the house, not the new-style enclosed lifeboats mounted on a lunching ramp, as are installed on ships today. In addition, the boats are mounted high up on the deck house, and I can't imagine the boat and everybody in it not being smashed against the side of the ship long before it ever reached the water's edge (see below).

http://www.shipspotting.com/gallery/...p?lid=1980289#


In any case, in weather conditions like that nobody goes out on the open deck, everybody stays inside with all the doors buttoned up. Since the people on the bridge apparently didn't even have time to get out a last distress message on the GMDSS (all you have to do is press a single "panic button" on the console), the end must have come suddenly. In addition, it doesn't appear that anybody has received a distress message from one of the two EPIRB (Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon) transponders, one of which is mounted on each bridge wing, and which are supposed to float free and begin transmitting automatically, directly to a special Search And Rescue satellite, in the event the ships sinks. One would have to suppose that she must have gone awfully quickly if neither one of those EPIRBS had a chance to float free from their brackets. Of course, there's always a chance that somebody may have tied the EPIRBS down. You are not supposed to do that, they are supposed to be mounted in such a way as to be able to float free. However, I actually sailed with one old Radio Officer who insisted upon "securing them for sea", and whom I had a difficult time persuading that he was in error.

Last edited by Klaatu83; 5th October 2015 at 20:26..
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  #78  
Old 5th October 2015, 20:17
litz litz is offline
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All I can say about mother nature is ... with winds like that, I wouldn't want to be in anything on the water, and on land in anything less substantial than a train locomotive.

Tornadoes can blow houses away, and can topple loaded freight cars ... but one has yet to topple a locomotive.

At sea ... with a cat-4 hurricane ... it doesn't much matter how big you are... she's gonna win.
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  #79  
Old 5th October 2015, 20:58
howardws howardws is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Taylor View Post
Simply put the Jones Act ensures .......
Thank you Michael Taylor
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  #80  
Old 5th October 2015, 21:10
Stephen J. Card's Avatar
Stephen J. Card Stephen J. Card is offline  
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Possible lashings carried away on vehicles on the car deck.. gone in seconds.
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  #81  
Old 5th October 2015, 21:30
billshaver billshaver is offline  
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yeah ...cargo shifted for sure...saw it on a ship...not pretty....and the rest you all know..in situiations they were in...
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  #82  
Old 5th October 2015, 21:45
billshaver billshaver is offline  
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yeah ...and the bell chimes at loyyds in london...not a joyous occaision......why, why, why...so senseless....
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  #83  
Old 5th October 2015, 22:06
billshaver billshaver is offline  
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court of inquery will tell all..its to visible... to hide anything...
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  #84  
Old 5th October 2015, 23:00
tsell tsell is offline
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My thoughts are with the 33 souls aboard during this avoidable tragedy. As with many of us on this site, I have experienced the terror of their predicament and know the despair they felt.
They would have had no chance to get any boats away and as has been said, would have been cocooned.
Aboard the little 2,000 ton Sheaf Arrow in a Biscay hurricane, we were listing heavily with iron ore, all, apart from engine crew locked on bridge and captains orders: 'no possibility for lifeboats, we take our chances with my ship'. Badly damaged we just made port.
I shed tears for the feelings of those aboard awaiting the inevitable.
Rest in Peace.

Taff
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  #85  
Old 5th October 2015, 23:03
billshaver billshaver is offline  
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not to detract here ...but makes you think of what happened on the drbishire bridge...saw them out of sept iles./point noir.back then....
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  #86  
Old 5th October 2015, 23:23
Klaatu83 Klaatu83 is offline  
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Coast Guard Video of the lifeboat that they found. Note the damage, it looks as though the boat was ripped free from the davit and falls:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQv_NxVBge0
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  #87  
Old 5th October 2015, 23:49
surfaceblow surfaceblow is offline  
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Across the country at the exact same time tomorrow, Saltchuk companies will hold a moment of solidarity in support of those aboard the El Faro and their loved ones and our sister companies TOTE Maritime Puerto Rico and TOTE Services.

Our moment of solidarity will be:
Hawaii - 9am
Alaska - 11am
West Coast - 12 noon
East Coast - 3pm

Wherever possible, at the appointed time above, please join your colleagues, in standing together in your respective common areas, for 1 minute of silence. Please await further instructions/details from leadership at your respective regions on gathering together.

Joe
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  #88  
Old 6th October 2015, 00:40
Wallace Slough Wallace Slough is offline  
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Here's an article from the New York Times which has a map with the track of the El Faro and the Hurricane. Note the very unusual track of the Hurricane wherein it was tracking to the north and became almost stationary before diving to the southwest to intersect the track of the El Faro.
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/06/us...quin.html?_r=0
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  #89  
Old 6th October 2015, 00:59
ChasH ChasH is offline  
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El Faro

Devastating news, have been watching in hope but alas i hoped for the best, but feared the worst, my heart goes out to them and there families. I don't care what flag or what country, we are all brothers of the sea. Just humming our anthem (O' hear us when we call to thee for those in peril on the sea)
I have been through a couple of hurricanes myself and seen what damage it caused, frightening,
chas
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  #90  
Old 6th October 2015, 02:26
capnfab capnfab is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Klaatu83 View Post
Coast Guard Video of the lifeboat that they found. Note the damage, it looks as though the boat was ripped free from the davit and falls:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQv_NxVBge0
Yeah, when I saw that, that lump in my throat got bigger. An incredibly violent ending.
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  #91  
Old 6th October 2015, 05:42
Klaatu83 Klaatu83 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wallace Slough View Post
Here's an article from the New York Times which has a map with the track of the El Faro and the Hurricane. Note the very unusual track of the Hurricane wherein it was tracking to the north and became almost stationary before diving to the southwest to intersect the track of the El Faro.
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/06/us...quin.html?_r=0
The hurricane track shown in the map attached to that article tells the story. They must have tried to slip behind the hurricane, passing through the so-called "safe semi-circle", but the storm doubled back on them and they ended up caught between the hurricane and the Bahamas. I can't imagine a more dangerous position to be in; a 40-year-old ship with a 15-degree list and no power, with a hurricane on one side and shoals on the other. Just thinking about it makes me shudder.
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  #92  
Old 6th October 2015, 06:59
Kaiser Bill Kaiser Bill is offline  
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What a shocking terrible tragedy, I hope we get a crew list of all hands posted here.
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  #93  
Old 6th October 2015, 12:26
barney b barney b is offline  
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El Faro

So, So, sad,may they rest in peace. I know I would not like to be out there in a forty year old ship,no matter how well maintained it was. I remember sailing out of Houston into hurricane Celia to get some sea room. Never saw a Shell tanker take on so much ballast,we had half cargo of of ballast. Like in this instance the hurricane changed direction and we were heading directly towards it.Hurricanes are unpredictable.We all got safely back to Curacao TG. It is a sad day for our community indeed.RIP.
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  #94  
Old 6th October 2015, 13:05
steamer659 steamer659 is offline  
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I would like to say Thank You for everyone's restraint and prudence by not "Monday Morning Quarterbacking" this most unfortunate incident.

Jeff Mathias (C/E) is a colleague of mine. Capt. Davidson worked extensively on our Car Carriers before moving over to the Caribbean vessels. The C/M was in the USMMA with Deb...

These are long time, Professional Senior Officers.. There seems to be a lot of second guessing and finger pointing in our local newscasts, many way off beam.

The latest news is that mechanical failure played a significant part of later events, let's wait and see as more developments are known. All of us Marine Engineer's know the score-

Let's Keep Praying, There IS still some hope.
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  #95  
Old 6th October 2015, 18:40
surfaceblow surfaceblow is offline  
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NTSB arrives in Jacksonville for El Faro investigation. Tom Roth-Roffy will be the investigator-in-charge. Tom is a ex MSC PAC Chief Engineer.

http://www.firstcoastnews.com/story/...faro/73433620/

Joe
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  #96  
Old 6th October 2015, 21:36
I REMEBER THIS SHIPS I REMEBER THIS SHIPS is offline  
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i called my old union and found out the El Faro is the old Ponce , So sad to hear that she gone... feeling sorry for the lost of our sea gone brothers who work so hard for their families My pray are for them and know there in a better place now ...I would care if NOLA who serve the vessel with weather information updating there system where it could forecast this problem mush sooner before they become a tragic...we are living in age today that with all this technology so advance that mariners should have advance system to be warn about this situations before head of time....it's a terrible lost and all w e could do is pray to god the crew is found ......Ruben Morales
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  #97  
Old 6th October 2015, 22:31
steamer659 steamer659 is offline  
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Tom and I have sailed together, on a few trips. Excellent Engineer, Great Guy.

Ruben- Please check your info... I believe you're mistaken. Puerto Rico, Northern Lights, El Faro- check the ABS Record.


Joe Stropole
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  #98  
Old 6th October 2015, 22:44
Jim Sutton Jim Sutton is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steamer659 View Post
I would like to say Thank You for everyone's restraint and prudence by not "Monday Morning Quarterbacking" this most unfortunate incident.

Jeff Mathias (C/E) is a colleague of mine. Capt. Davidson worked extensively on our Car Carriers before moving over to the Caribbean vessels. The C/M was in the USMMA with Deb...

These are long time, Professional Senior Officers.. There seems to be a lot of second guessing and finger pointing in our local newscasts, many way off beam.

The latest news is that mechanical failure played a significant part of later events, let's wait and see as more developments are known. All of us Marine Engineer's know the score-

Let's Keep Praying, There IS still some hope.
Well said! I was just remarking to a friend that there seems to be a sudden abundance of "maritime experts" everywhere!
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  #99  
Old 6th October 2015, 22:50
canadian canadian is offline  
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Originally Posted by Klaatu83 View Post
The hurricane track shown in the map attached to that article tells the story. They must have tried to slip behind the hurricane, passing through the so-called "safe semi-circle", but the storm doubled back on them and they ended up caught between the hurricane and the Bahamas. I can't imagine a more dangerous position to be in; a 40-year-old ship with a 15-degree list and no power, with a hurricane on one side and shoals on the other. Just thinking about it makes me shudder.
I will shudder with you.
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  #100  
Old 7th October 2015, 00:26
litz litz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Klaatu83 View Post
The hurricane track shown in the map attached to that article tells the story. They must have tried to slip behind the hurricane, passing through the so-called "safe semi-circle", but the storm doubled back on them and they ended up caught between the hurricane and the Bahamas. I can't imagine a more dangerous position to be in; a 40-year-old ship with a 15-degree list and no power, with a hurricane on one side and shoals on the other. Just thinking about it makes me shudder.
I don't think the age (and for that matter size) much matters here ... onboard anything, with no power, no steering, already listing ... with a cat3/4 hurricane on one side, and shoals on the other side is terrifying no matter what you're sailing.
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