Tree Class - Number of Tanks - Page 3 - Ships Nostalgia
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Tree Class - Number of Tanks

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  #51  
Old 14th September 2016, 11:18
GrahamWeifang's Avatar
GrahamWeifang GrahamWeifang is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigNick View Post
I thought the Tree boats all had heater coils. In fact i thought they were the last fleet to have them so when they went we wondered how we were ever going to trade up the Baltic in January, as i had done on the Hawthorn in Jan 78, icebreaking as we went. They were also the last fleet with thick enough plates, the Itty and River boats had plating so thin you could see their framing.

As for the original question, i thought there were 33 tanks, 11 port, 11 centre and 11 starb'd. But maybe some of the centre ones were combined into larger tanks? I was down the pit so it was never really my department.

By the way, the 4 big electric cargo pumps on the Hawthorn were named (Port to Stb'd) Matthrew, Mark, Luke and John.

Keep the lamp swinging,
I remember as elecky, going up the east coast of Scandinavia, I think it was to some Swedish port.
The whole sea had iced over, for as far as the eye could see,
I was on a tree boat, maybe Hawthorn, maybe Ivy, Holly, can't remember.
We were in-front, and breaking ice, with a few other boats a half mile or so behind taking advantage of the newly broken ice.

All was well for a few hours, until we just came to a slow stop.
Stuck.
Ice all around.
I took a run up from control to main deck, to see again all the ice.
Then we got an order for stop engines, then half astern.
We all knew what was coming, so after 10 - 15 minutes or so, we got stop engines, and half ahead.
I left the 2nd, and 3rd down there to watch the spectical (sp) , of when we going to hit the "V" where we had just came astern from.

Well, the boat shuddered, and these huge ice cubes rained down every where.
many landing on the main deck, most landing on the sea ice.
As they landed on the sea ice, they shattered into pieces, and whizzed off at what looked like 100 mph, skating across the ice.

on arriving at the discharge port, it took a few little tuggies running up and down between us and the jetty, clearing the ice, so we could be pushed alongside by even bigger tuggies.

We did hear a week or so later, I think it was the Holly, also went there to discharge, and had propeller damage.

Could have been about winter 1978 or 1979.
Too long ago to remember dates.

Gra.
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  #52  
Old 17th September 2016, 15:17
Taylormoran Taylormoran is offline  
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Active: 1971 - 1986
 
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I did two trips on Tree class ships. The Laurel was my first trip as Deck Cadet in 1971-2 under Captain A.E. Marshall. The Beech was my penultimate trip with BP in 1984-5 under Captain N.D.Brookes and I was promoted on board from 2/O to C/O. Both were on the UK coast. The Laurel carried heavy fuel oil, mainly to Scandinavia and East Germany during the winter. She definitely had heating coils then, and both had 33 tanks (11 x 3).
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  #53  
Old 18th September 2016, 21:57
Andrew147 Andrew147 is offline  
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I thought the Tree boats all had heater coils. In fact i thought they were the last fleet to have them so when they went we wondered how we were ever going to trade up the Baltic in January, as i had done on the Hawthorn in Jan 78, icebreaking as we went. They were also the last fleet with thick enough plates, the Itty and River boats had plating so thin you could see their framing.

In the winter of '84 (miners strike) some of the Ity boats (Security was one) were fitted with temporary heating coils, in Bremen I think. They carried Russian fuel oil (from a rail jetty near Leningrad?) into Immingham and Thurrock. The package boiler burner was overhauled by Sacke back to the makers original spec (to cope with the load) as we didn't need to make IG. There were always some deck valves to change every morning (having frozen up) as they were really cheap and had been used to control the steam to individual tanks overnight as the deck tried to keep the tank temperatures correct. It was a f/ing cold winter! but the ship seemed to cope with the Baltic weather.

A previous mention in this thread mentioned the deck hydraulic power packs failing. This happened on the Fidelity towards the end of its time. Work had been done on the deck valves but the lines had not been cleaned out with the result the IMO pumps failed with all the c*** coming back and there was no return filter in the system. Once a back flush filter was fitted (for only 300) the pumps were almost reliable. Why no filter was fitted originally is anyone's guess.
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  #54  
Old 19th September 2016, 10:26
DaveM399 DaveM399 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew147 View Post
I thought the Tree boats all had heater coils. In fact i thought they were the last fleet to have them so when they went we wondered how we were ever going to trade up the Baltic in January, as i had done on the Hawthorn in Jan 78, icebreaking as we went. They were also the last fleet with thick enough plates, the Itty and River boats had plating so thin you could see their framing.

In the winter of '84 (miners strike) some of the Ity boats (Security was one) were fitted with temporary heating coils, in Bremen I think. They carried Russian fuel oil (from a rail jetty near Leningrad?) into Immingham and Thurrock. The package boiler burner was overhauled by Sacke back to the makers original spec (to cope with the load) as we didn't need to make IG. There were always some deck valves to change every morning (having frozen up) as they were really cheap and had been used to control the steam to individual tanks overnight as the deck tried to keep the tank temperatures correct. It was a f/ing cold winter! but the ship seemed to cope with the Baltic weather.

A previous mention in this thread mentioned the deck hydraulic power packs failing. This happened on the Fidelity towards the end of its time. Work had been done on the deck valves but the lines had not been cleaned out with the result the IMO pumps failed with all the c*** coming back and there was no return filter in the system. Once a back flush filter was fitted (for only 300) the pumps were almost reliable. Why no filter was fitted originally is anyone's guess.
I was on the Security when she had her heating coils fitted. This was in Autumn 1980 in the Keppel yard, Singapore. The whole drydock was quite a long affair, 6 weeks in total and we lived ashore, which was very pleasant. The Security was also my last trip in 86 at the time of the cull, spent coasting in NW Europe.
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  #55  
Old 19th September 2016, 15:32
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twogrumpy twogrumpy is offline  
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#53
Interesting about the IMO pumps on the Fidelity.
We did a PM on our cargo valve system, part of which was replacement of the hydraulic fluid with that specified and supplied by HQ.
Average running time post PM was about ten minutes, strip down found the pump seized and the scrolls torn up.
Deckies were not at all happy as deck valves were on hand for several weeks.
As mentioned, return filters were fitted, were the motors running in the correct direction? pumps removed and freed up every day, spares fitted, and on and on.

As usual work was ongoing on the deck block/control valves, with the assumption being that cr** was washed back down the line.

The outcome of all this work, friction between departments, costs etc?

Oh, the spec. of the company specified hydraulic stuff was incorrect, not being suitable for the hydraulic system as fitted.

Good times.
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The greatest cross I have to bear is the cross of Lorraine.

Last edited by twogrumpy; 19th September 2016 at 15:34..
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  #56  
Old 21st September 2016, 16:14
jep1916 jep1916 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiefCharles View Post
Following the recent discussions on the number of tanks on the Tree Class I have come across the "Little Green Book" of Engine Equipment Details for the British Poplar dated October 1965 and on page 12 it mentions that an eductor is fitted for tank cleaning, and takes its motive water from one cargo pump operating with either a sea suction or No.11 Centre cargo tank. See attached photos.
I sailed on the Holly as Second Engineer from Jan 68 until July 68 and Phil Sutherland was Chief. It was the only Tree boat I sailed on and was the only BP Tanker I sailed on that never ever suffered an engine room problem. We even used to help painting the engine room on watch at times. She had an immaculate engine room at that time.
I am envious of anyone who could memorize 27 ullages - I could not memorize 4 bunker tank ullages!!!
Regards
Roger
I stood by the building of the British Poplar as 4/E. I also sailed on the British Holly as 3/E and 2/E. Two very good ships, as were most of the tree class. I also sailed as 2/E on the British Ivy and that ship was a total pig.
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  #57  
Old 21st September 2016, 20:38
stevekelly10 stevekelly10 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jep1916 View Post
I stood by the building of the British Poplar as 4/E. I also sailed on the British Holly as 3/E and 2/E. Two very good ships, as were most of the tree class. I also sailed as 2/E on the British Ivy and that ship was a total pig.
Sadly I was the last 3/E to sail onboard the Poplar under BP, as I was there when we handed her over to the new Italian owners and renamed Utilitas. It was still a fine ship then .
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