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  #26  
Old 27th September 2012, 11:32
Scelerat Scelerat is offline  
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He had an outstanding war record.
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  #27  
Old 28th September 2012, 18:06
Tony Shaw Tony Shaw is offline  
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Scelerat - would like to hear more about this ! Ta!
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  #28  
Old 28th September 2012, 18:21
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He had an outstanding war record.
i'm so sorry but i just could'nt stop myself: was it "we'll meet again" sung by vera lynne
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  #29  
Old 29th September 2012, 10:59
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As a matter of interest to any who sailed in Strick's around that time. Seddon was mate and Jenkins 2nd mate. Great guys, both,. My beef was the run. I might as well have been in tankers and that is where I went.

My leisurely tramp cargoship routine was shaken when we were at anchor, handling the cargo, and the pilot boat came for us. I reported to de Neumann and he said "Let go the barges, immediately,and ring Stand By!" Seddon laughed at me said "You are in a big ship liner company, now, with a strict schedule to maintain. None of that,old, trampship stuff here, you know"

This tight schedule BS was brought home to me on the leg between Dover and Copenhagen. The weather was foul, visibilty down to yards, and I was on the bridge, by myself, de Neumann, probably, going over his paperwork. I asked to reduce speed and that was refused, just keep the siren going. A big freighter, to me she looked huge, came down the port side. I prayed for my watch to end without mishap and, that, decided me to leave any ideas about Stricks with my relief.
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  #30  
Old 29th September 2012, 12:16
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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When I was a kid in Middlesbrough, everytime I used to go into town on the bus, you could see the funnels of the ships in the docks from North Ormesby railway crossing. My favourite was Palm Line (very exotic) and my second favourite was Stricks - although I didn't know the names of either at the time. One of the things that drew me to far away places with stange sounding names. Never sailed with Stricks but did visit a lot of the dumps they frequented.

John T
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  #31  
Old 29th September 2012, 18:03
Split Split is offline  
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Originally Posted by trotterdotpom View Post
When I was a kid in Middlesbrough, everytime I used to go into town on the bus, you could see the funnels of the ships in the docks from North Ormesby railway crossing. My favourite was Palm Line (very exotic) and my second favourite was Stricks - although I didn't know the names of either at the time. One of the things that drew me to far away places with stange sounding names. Never sailed with Stricks but did visit a lot of the dumps they frequented.

John T
My last port, on Goulistan, was Copenhagen. I know that you missed that because it was not a dump! It was the only worthwhile place that I went to!
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  #32  
Old 1st October 2012, 09:51
Scelerat Scelerat is offline  
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Scelerat - would like to hear more about this ! Ta!
Helped to secure a large German unexploded bomb that had penetrated the ER, slung it and got it out and overboard.
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  #33  
Old 1st October 2012, 17:52
Tony Shaw Tony Shaw is offline  
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Thanks Scelerat and also Joe Buckham !
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  #34  
Old 12th January 2013, 22:12
michael mcloughlin michael mcloughlin is offline  
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Strick Line

Thanks to all who replied to Strick Line.
I sailed on the Baharistan/GBQU as junior R/O for two trips. The first was my very first trip at sea. Before that I had'n't travelled a 100 miles so it was a real eye opener. I enjoyed it so much, it was a great adventure for a young fellow of 20. We travelled all over the Persian Gulf. Had no problem in Iran or Iraq, how the world has changed.
We went to Bombay/Durban/Capetown/around Cape Horn(well thro' the Magellan Straits actually) and then to Valparaiso. A fabulous trip. The crew were great. The captain was Booker and he nearly booked me! LOL. He probably had good reason too. Stopped my tap for awhile. I had my 21st birthday in the Persian gulf.
We tied up near another Strick line ship in Khormshahr and had a great P.up. Drank one ship out first and then went on to the other one.
Happy days!!!
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  #35  
Old 24th January 2013, 21:23
Trevor Clements Trevor Clements is offline  
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Originally Posted by manowari View Post
I am currently researching the Strick Line cargo ship Seistan that blew up off Bahrain in 1958. 60 died in the explosion but quite a number survived including C/O Jones his wife and son. Peter the son and his mother Valerie are back in Bahrain for the first time since the explosion visiting the site of the wreck and laying a wreath to departed friends. I would be pleased to hear from any one with details and photos relating to the ship and the disaster.
If you have anything relating to 2nd R/O Peter Fox who lost his life in the explosion on the Seistan, the Wireless College Colwyn Bay might want to put a tribute on their web site. Peter left the College around 1958, I remember him, and I know that others at the college remember him rather better. - Many thanks.
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  #36  
Old 24th January 2013, 21:29
Trevor Clements Trevor Clements is offline  
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Originally Posted by frank elliott View Post
have just been reading the threads on link for Strick Line Ltd.and of interest for me was the info on 'Seistan' lost in an explosion in the Gulf in 1958. A good friend while at Wireless college Colwyn Bay about 1956 was an Irish chap named Peter Fox,who really struggled to achieve his PMG ticket, was on 'Seistan' for his first trip,acting as 2nd r/o trainee ,sadly got killed. What an awful first trip!
Hi Frank,
I have asked a similar question because I also remember Peter, and I was talking to Dave Baker by e mail last week and mentioned Peter Fox and yourself, he suggested that we could put a tribute/report on the Wireless College web site if we had any details.
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  #37  
Old 25th August 2014, 10:04
Neumann Neumann is offline  
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Hello, I am the nephew of Derrick "Haji" de Neumann. My father, Derrick's brother, was Peter de Neumann, GM, whom it was who cleared the bomb from the engine-room of his ship in March 1941. Derrick had lots of tales about his time with Strick's. My father, after 1953 when he ceased his sea service, was Harbourmaster in the Port of London Authority, and I well remember travelling aboard the Harbourmaster's launch, when my father boarded the Gorjistan and had a drink with Derrick, by the time Dad disembarked we were off the North Foreland. Derrick was Chief Officer aboard Bandar Shahpour when she was torpedoed off Takoradi; the Royal Mail they were carrying came down like snow after the explosion.
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  #38  
Old 26th August 2014, 18:40
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Hello, I am the nephew of Derrick "Haji" de Neumann. My father, Derrick's brother, was Peter de Neumann, GM, whom it was who cleared the bomb from the engine-room of his ship in March 1941. Derrick had lots of tales about his time with Strick's. My father, after 1953 when he ceased his sea service, was Harbourmaster in the Port of London Authority, and I well remember travelling aboard the Harbourmaster's launch, when my father boarded the Gorjistan and had a drink with Derrick, by the time Dad disembarked we were off the North Foreland. Derrick was Chief Officer aboard Bandar Shahpour when she was torpedoed off Takoradi; the Royal Mail they were carrying came down like snow after the explosion.
I sailed with him on the Goulistan as 3rd Officer. Chief Officer was called Seddon and 2nd Officer Jenkins. This must have been early 1954.

Afraid that I didn't like the run and did one voyage, only.
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  #39  
Old 15th September 2015, 10:14
skilganaban skilganaban is offline  
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Originally Posted by Tony Shaw View Post
As a postscript to my last message Dave, I note you were 2nd mate on the "Shahristan"(I thought you might have been cadet - I thought you were younger than me !!!!!) Was John Wightman the 3rd mate ? I was cadet with him on the "Baluchistan"
Tony Shaw: John Wightman, his wife Chris and two children moved to the USA around about 1974. In the early 80's he set up his own stevedoring company in Wilmingtom NC. Sadly John passed away about 6 years ago. I sailed with John and family on the 'Floristan' around 1968. He was 2nd Mate and I was 3rd Mate. They were good times. John and I remained friendly up until he passed away. I was with a company that ran into Wilmington quite regularly.
Dave Parke
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  #40  
Old 15th September 2015, 20:51
Tonykshaw Tonykshaw is offline  
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Hello Dave/ Sorry to hear about John, I have good memories of our time together. You and I sailed together on the "Khuzistan", me as 3/0 and you as cadet. That was a good round trip loading general round the South African coast on charter to Clan Line. I did the first two voyages on the "Floristan", you must have joined a couple of years later. I keep in touch with Bernard Toft from time to time, we sailed together on the "Gorjistan". Anyway Dave , nice to know you're still up and running. Before I go, I remember visiting your ship one Christmas at Bandar Shahpour with a couple of other lads hoping to have a drink with you. You were still asleep in your bunk, we couldn't rouse you but sat down amongst a 7 high pile of cases on Tennants and had a couple of cans.When we left you were still dead to the world. We did wish you a Happy Christmas. Take care.
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  #41  
Old 1st November 2015, 07:47
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OK you Strick peoples... some of us who don't have such intimate knowledge of the gulf are having trouble with this https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/galler...n-port/cat/532

Another photo in the set showed a Hansa ship alongside and the latest posted shows same wharf with lots of cranes...any thoughts?
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  #42  
Old 1st November 2015, 20:52
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Donald McGhee Donald McGhee is offline  
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A former Strick master was a great friend of my fathers, one John Brown, who swallowed the anchor and took up painting, producing some very good art work. I have several of his pictures and rank him pretty highly.
He is long departed now, but what a great way to remember people eh? Just shows ya that some masters are more than just seamen!
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  #43  
Old 28th April 2016, 20:20
alex shields alex shields is offline  
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hi tony i remember you on the ships.when you left strick line i think you went on to the locks on the manchester ship canal.the reason being i was chucking out heavy black smoke as one of the forced draught fans had packed up and we were on natural draught and you gave us a smoke warning.the ship was the baluchistan.happy days
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  #44  
Old 28th April 2016, 21:00
alex shields alex shields is offline  
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i remember john.he was mate on a strick line ship and we were in south shields during the seamans strike.we went out to marsden on the bus ,had a few beers and had all the ladies on the bus singing on the way back .lovely man
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  #45  
Old 28th April 2016, 21:21
Tonykshaw Tonykshaw is offline  
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Hello Alex- Nice to hear from you. Do you remember I borrowed your white shoes for a cocktail party in Mauritius on the "Floristan's" maiden voyage. A few of us got a bit fed up and skipped it ashore. Fell in the drink coming back on the launch and ruined your shoes. After a few years on the locks I went back to sea with Harrison's, then Esso and finished up skippering with RMC Marine. Been retired now 8 years, almost working until 65. Am doing fine and I hope you are the same. I'd also borrowed the chief's white trousers. He wasn't pleased either. Take care. Tony (Shaw)
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  #46  
Old 30th April 2016, 16:32
Chris Knight Chris Knight is offline  
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Strick line, I never had the opportunity to sale with (only Bibby line), but I well remember the contacts with them through Tom Bell boss at Manchester Dry docks, my mother and father (Norah Knight & Sam Knight), from their time with MDD, Ellesmere port yard and later, after the demise of MDD, through the company my farther and his cousins created called 'Thomas & Knight ships riggers', to continue the removal of funnels and masts, including radar masts! This always used to occur at the crane berth, at the entrance to the Manchester ship canal at Eastham, with the reverse actions occuring, re-installation of funnels & masts, when departing the MSC again at Eastham crane berth. This process was always to guarantee safe transit of all ships under the trip wires which in those days were strung across the MSC, both sides of the bridge, prior to transit under bridges, which normally prevented contact between the ships high point, maybe a mast and the actual bridge structure. In those days I was only a school kid 13, all now long gone including MSC, Eastham Crane Berth, Tommy Bell, Norah Knight & Sam Knight. I well remember my time at Riversdale, looking across the Mersey to Eastham each Friday, for crane movement signs, for whether it was a bus and underground journey to Woodside?
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  #47  
Old 13th October 2016, 16:07
tongwyn tongwyn is offline  
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Re the Seistan

Quote:
Originally Posted by manowari View Post
I am currently researching the Strick Line cargo ship Seistan that blew up off Bahrain in 1958. 60 died in the explosion but quite a number survived including C/O Jones his wife and son. Peter the son and his mother Valerie are back in Bahrain for the first time since the explosion visiting the site of the wreck and laying a wreath to departed friends. I would be pleased to hear from any one with details and photos relating to the ship and the disaster.
Hi Manowari, Well you certainly brought back memories, I was one of the rescuers of the Seistan crew, I was on the MV Treglisson anchored a few hundred yards from the Seistan when she blew up. we saw her come to the anchorage and we knew from radio messages that she had a fire on board, when I saw your message my blood ran cold, it was a bad memory that took a long time to go away. I was only 17 yrs old at the time and had never witnessed death before, so seeing it at such a scale was frightening, I remember seeing at least one female, there was an American warship nearby and they also swung all boats away to the rescue, I still have a vivid memory of television sets floating around. i know there were survivors because I was holding on to two over the side of the lifeboat. I have to stop here, (not feeling too good) if you want to know everything, reply.

Last edited by tongwyn; 13th October 2016 at 16:19.. Reason: spelling
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  #48  
Old 13th October 2016, 19:12
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IAN M IAN M is offline
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Eighteen Strick vessels were lost during the War, plus the Fort Howe - managed for the MOWT.
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  #49  
Old 13th October 2016, 22:36
Chris Knight Chris Knight is offline  
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Mast, radar mast & funnel renoval

Both of my parents (Sam & Norah Knigh, both now deceased) used to be involved with the remove pf various high bits of ships at the Eastham crane berth, for their MSC transits. Both with Manchester dry docks and their own company (Thomas Knight ships riggers), when Manchester dry docks Ellesmere Port yard closed down. So had many contacts within Strick line OM, agents and siperintendant etc!
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  #50  
Old 8th February 2017, 22:29
dick593 dick593 is offline  
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Seistan

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Originally Posted by manowari View Post
I am currently researching the Strick Line cargo ship Seistan that blew up off Bahrain in 1958. 60 died in the explosion but quite a number survived including C/O Jones his wife and son. Peter the son and his mother Valerie are back in Bahrain for the first time since the explosion visiting the site of the wreck and laying a wreath to departed friends. I would be pleased to hear from any one with details and photos relating to the ship and the disaster.
Hello
My Late Father was given command of Seistan but turned it down as he was on leave for the birth of my brother. I witnessed the launch of the ship at Redheads Yard, Jarrow. Bill Chappell the Captain was a personal friend of my dad. Our family doesn't do ship launches any more.
I have some photos if you are interested get in touch
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