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Understanding the terminology - seamen's vernacular

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  #101  
Old 1st October 2017, 16:18
tom roberts tom roberts is offline  
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P.s.not Allan out of her purse but a loan,just in case any of you get the wrong idea.
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  #102  
Old 1st October 2017, 21:35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barrie Youde View Post
To revert to the matter of the wammy/whammy - is ropeyarn used to prevent something from happening or to enable a thing to happen?
When tying up, the wammy was used to prevent you getting a huge bollocking from the bosun
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  #103  
Old 1st October 2017, 22:14
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Pat Kennedy Pat Kennedy is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barrie Youde View Post
"Tommed-off" or "tomming-off"?

An expression used in the stowage of cargo, as I recall it, meaning that it was secured by means of carpentry work, if necessary by either the chippy or the tommaloe.

In Glen Line, with an all-Chinese crew with no European carpenter, I seem to recall also that it was the Chinese carpenter himself who was called the tommaloe; but I'm open to correction on all points.

I agree with Bridie as to the spelling of "wammy" - a word which I had heard often but had not seen written down until seeing it here in SN. "Double-whammy", on the other hand, is often seen in the national press.
When I was in the Blue Flu shoregang in Birkenhead, much of our work was helping the Odyssey Works shipwrights tomming off cargo ready for sea. We used stacks of 3 x 3 timber, bags of 4" nails and miles of lashing wire with bulldog grips and of course loads of wammies/whammies.
When we lowered the derricks ready for sailing, all the guys and runners were tied up out of the way using more wammies. They were an indispensable part of the ship's equipment. We even hung bottles of Anchor beer over the side on wammies to keep them cool while in Hong Kong.(No fridge in the sailor's mess in those days)
Regarding the word "tommaloe", I asked a Chinese speaker what was the Chinese word for carpenter/shipwright. It is "Mujiang" , so I guess the origin of the word is not Mandarin Chinese, but could well be "Shanghainese" dialect which is very different.
Regards,
Pat
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  #104  
Old 1st October 2017, 22:35
kauvaka kauvaka is offline  
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Advantage note = Advance note = pay advance when signing on, Dockside pubs and shops would cash or "crack" a note at 25% discount. If the donor didn't sail with the vessel the cashier didn't get paid. If he did sail the cashier got the full whack.
Admirality - heard on RFAs referring to the Admiralty
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  #105  
Old 2nd October 2017, 05:35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom roberts View Post
a word used by as far as I know by Liverpool seamen was i will mug you meaning he will either lend you a few bob or maybe pay for your ale. Today it's used as you know to rob you or such even today my missus uses she will mug me if I want Allan out of her purse, and she's from Birkenhead.
Agreed Tom. My mother still uses the term (and she is eighty). "Here, I'lll mug you a beer!". In other words, I will give you the money. And she is as pure Wallasey as you can get! My Nan was born in the Stone Cottages in Wallasey Village. Pat can comment on the relevance of this!
Rgds.
Dave
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  #106  
Old 2nd October 2017, 12:04
William Clark8 William Clark8 is offline  
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Strap up

How did that term originate?
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  #107  
Old 2nd October 2017, 13:29
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kauvaka View Post
Advantage note = Advance note = pay advance when signing on, Dockside pubs and shops would cash or "crack" a note at 25% discount. If the donor didn't sail with the vessel the cashier didn't get paid. If he did sail the cashier got the full whack.
Admirality - heard on RFAs referring to the Admiralty
When I worked for Scottish Ship Management I used to do the wages and issued a few "Notes on Owners". This was a facility whereby crewmembers could send money home in an emergency. They were allowed to send as much money as they had in the ship at the time of issue. I just used to type them out on a piece of paper and am struggling to remember if I sent them to the company or gave them to the person concerned. I think it was probably the former.

John T

PS I remember people using the term "Admirality" - a bit like the ones who say "Westminister".
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  #108  
Old 2nd October 2017, 13:31
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Originally Posted by William Clark8 View Post
How did that term originate?
Wasn't "strapping up" what they did in the galley at the end of the day? Presumably securing all the pots and pans and what not.

John T
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  #109  
Old 2nd October 2017, 15:08
TonyAllen TonyAllen is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trotterdotpom View Post
Wasn't "strapping up" what they did in the galley at the end of the day? Presumably securing all the pots and pans and what not.

John T
no.on old ships the plates ect were on racks .slid back in and a leather strap was was secured over the front .and the door shut, so in really heavy the door might open but the strap held the racks in.

in the galley on blue flu the only thing secured at night was the large stock pot ..it was easier to put large to small pots inside each other and put in the large sink .everything else was cooked on hot plates only a few frying pans were use for omelettes ect .plus the large ovens were very well secured from the movement of the ship.the baker would put all his smalll stuff inside the Hobart mixer the first ship I was on the "avistone" 1955 had the strap in the pantry.the store room was under the pantry and the the same system was used then.
the iron bars were only used in heavy weather while. we were cooking

with all the slots in the iron bars you could make so many different shapes to fit the pans .of course they di not need many pots in blue flu
soon as it was used the galley boy would have to wash and clean it right away ,to be used again, never ending it seemed .but if you kept up to the mark as the meal when on you could catch up and only have a bit to do at the end .and have your wash down ready when the cooks left the galley .then done.6 am wake up 7.30 ish finish 2.1/0 on your own doing spuds and veg ect in the afternoon make sure ovens back on .put the roast meat in at the time the chef told you too."I was so busy once put the meat in an hour late alf brierly the chef gave me a right boloking." ready for the cooks turn to, then one hour break.then back in the galley again .I think it also the same hours for the Peggy...cheers
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  #110  
Old 2nd October 2017, 15:48
Pam Turner Pam Turner is offline
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(Your) Beam end ?

One nautical term I remember my Dad using at home occasionally, and although unintentional, insensitively to a teenage girl in her new jeans, if you get my drift..
Can anyone give the nautical meaning? think I'm thick skinned enough to take it now!!
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  #111  
Old 2nd October 2017, 16:17
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is offline  
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It refers to a ship which is half-capsized, with her masts lying level with the surface of the sea.

The "beams" are the ship's beams which are an integral part of the construction, and which lie horizontally across the ship and upon which the deck is laid. Hence when a ship is half-capsized - or listing at 90 degrees, she is well and truly on her beam ends - or the ends of her beams - and also in much difficulty.


Any young lady who might once have enjoyed the title "rear of the year" could find herself on her beam ends if she might run into some serious misfortune!

Last edited by Barrie Youde; 2nd October 2017 at 16:25..
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  #112  
Old 2nd October 2017, 16:47
tom roberts tom roberts is offline  
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Seafaring terms

A skin boat I.e.fyffes banana boats,skinning out I.e.jumping ship or correctly leaving a ship before completion of articles mostly done in Australia or New Zealand go ashore gear I.e.your best clobber.
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  #113  
Old 3rd October 2017, 06:38
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"Two Blocks!" Had more than one connotation...

Taff
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  #114  
Old 3rd October 2017, 15:14
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A forced draught job! Another.........
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  #115  
Old 3rd October 2017, 15:21
tom roberts tom roberts is offline  
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Previous post reminded me of another term. Black Draught a potion that would shift tree stumps let alone the problem of constipation,it was said that more than one Kroo boy on the African west coast died of peritonitis when the chief steward diagnosed constipation instead and dished out copious amounts of the draught.
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  #116  
Old 3rd October 2017, 22:38
holland25 holland25 is offline  
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Perhaps not pertinent, but one I have always liked is ,"snug in the lee of bum island".
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  #117  
Old 4th October 2017, 15:52
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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v n c
Very Nice Chap
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  #118  
Old 4th October 2017, 16:00
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Originally Posted by Chillytoes View Post
One good source of salty talk is “All Hands And the Cook” by Barry Thompson. The sub-title is ‘The customs and language of the British Merchant Seaman 1875-1975’. It’s bit hard to get now, however, and doesn’t have some of the more fruity terms quoted above!
I always remember an old AB on a Harrisons boat mentioning that we should make a point of visiting the Seamans Clinic for a check up after we`d been away`When you`ve been shagging all hands and the cook`
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  #119  
Old 4th October 2017, 16:19
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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I was once in Mann Island when a bloke came in and asked the clerk`Any chance of making a come back?` when told yes but he had to go virtually immediately he said`I`ll just drop me lad off back home pick my gear then`and was gone.Fastest job interview I`ve ever seen.
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  #120  
Old 4th October 2017, 16:57
William Clark8 William Clark8 is offline  
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V n c

Was that not regarded as being worse than a D R?
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  #121  
Old 4th October 2017, 17:05
Les Gibson Les Gibson is offline  
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VNC= Voyage not completed. Not necessarily a bad stamp in the book . Could be hospitalisation, but invariably used when someone had 'jumped'
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  #122  
Old 4th October 2017, 20:45
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VNC= Voyage not completed. Not necessarily a bad stamp in the book . Could be hospitalisation, but invariably used when someone had 'jumped'
I got a VNC when I missed the Anchises in Avonmouth. I was stuck in a doctor's surgery with a bad case of tonsilitis. When I got back there was the Anchises leaving the lock heading for Birkenhead. I jumped a train and got there before her.
I got a dressing down from Mr Greenwood in Odyssey works, but that was the end of the matter, and I sailed in my next Bluey a couple of weeks later, after I had my tonsils out.
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  #123  
Old 4th October 2017, 21:05
Pam Turner Pam Turner is offline
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What's a D R??
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  #124  
Old 4th October 2017, 21:16
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What's a D R??
It is an entry in a seaman's discharge book, meaning, "Decline to report"
The discharge book had two columns where the captain entered his report of the seaman's character, first on ability and second on general conduct. Usually the reports were "Very Good, Very Good"
Sometimes a bad guy would get a DR for one of these categories, and a real bad guy would get a "Double DR" It always led to getting sacked from the ship, and the company, and sometimes getting drummed out of the Merchant Navy.
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  #125  
Old 4th October 2017, 21:16
William Clark8 William Clark8 is offline  
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Dr

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What's a D R??
Decline to Report
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