Bankline in the 50's.... - Page 11 - Ships Nostalgia
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Bankline in the 50's....

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  #251  
Old 13th March 2010, 07:40
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Alan Rawlinson Alan Rawlinson is offline
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Crestbank 1958/9

Found a nice one of the Crestbank circa 1959 coasting in N.Z. Think it is a view in Otago Harbour, passing Port Chalmers with the derricks up... She was only about a year old here, but still needing plenty of touch up paint on the hull.
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Last edited by Alan Rawlinson; 13th March 2010 at 07:44..
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  #252  
Old 13th March 2010, 15:57
Joe C Joe C is offline  
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Second and third mates on the Irisbank,mid fifties.I'm sure Alan will have an explanation!
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  #253  
Old 13th March 2010, 20:21
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Alan Rawlinson Alan Rawlinson is offline
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Quote:
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Second and third mates on the Irisbank,mid fifties.I'm sure Alan will have an explanation!
Thanks Joe, Never clapped eyes on this one before! We regularly played leapfrog of course, like you do on a 2 year voyage...
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  #254  
Old 13th March 2010, 20:32
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East, West, or southbank?

Found this one of the Eastbank, Westbank, or Southbank?? Any detectives out there? The very high radar mast might be a clue, but although I sailed on all 3 ships, cannot recall. My guess is Southbank.
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  #255  
Old 13th March 2010, 22:53
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Alan,
on this photo of the Eastbank there does not appear to be a radar mast ,WHEN were they fitted
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  #256  
Old 14th March 2010, 04:22
Johnnietwocoats Johnnietwocoats is offline  
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Originally Posted by jimthehat View Post
Alan,
on this photo of the Eastbank there does not appear to be a radar mast ,WHEN were they fitted
Ahhh... My first Ship. 12 Months. I swear I painted every Nook and Cranny on her but I must admit I din't know wether she had a Radar Mast in 1960/61...I presume she did....

TC.....
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  #257  
Old 14th March 2010, 08:50
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Alan,
on this photo of the Eastbank there does not appear to be a radar mast ,WHEN were they fitted

Jim,

That must be an old photo - there is a white stripe down the side of the hull. ( I think we need Alistair's help!)
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  #258  
Old 14th March 2010, 10:33
rcraig rcraig is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimthehat View Post
Alan,
on this photo of the Eastbank there does not appear to be a radar mast ,WHEN were they fitted
The Eastbank was not fitted with radar before I left her in 1954, on my recollection and none of the photos in my possession show a radar mast.
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  #259  
Old 14th March 2010, 17:49
Johnnietwocoats Johnnietwocoats is offline  
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Originally Posted by rcraig View Post
The Eastbank was not fitted with radar before I left her in 1954, on my recollection and none of the photos in my possession show a radar mast.


Here she is. Radar Mast and all.....

TC
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  #260  
Old 14th March 2010, 18:54
wireless man wireless man is offline  
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Sorry if I ask an obvious question but could someone explain what "the copra run" was and its attractions or otherwise.I know its a bit off topic but it does appear in quite a lot of Bankline threads
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  #261  
Old 14th March 2010, 18:58
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Alistair Macnab Alistair Macnab is offline  
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Bank Line White Sheerline....

I think we've all agreed that the white sheerline on the hull was discontinued end-1952. Certainly the "Beaverbank" delivered in February 1953 never had the white line and by the time I arrived in Calcutta December 1953 where there were a number of Bank boats in port, there was no sign of a white line anywhere. Nearest I ever got to this elusive decoration was on the "Ettrickbank" in 1956 when chipping paint on the sheerstrake, the white line showed up in a distinctive strip of preserved steel on an otherwise rustly plate.
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  #262  
Old 14th March 2010, 19:05
rcraig rcraig is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan Rawlinson View Post
Found this one of the Eastbank, Westbank, or Southbank?? Any detectives out there? The very high radar mast might be a clue, but although I sailed on all 3 ships, cannot recall. My guess is Southbank.
The photos in my album which were taken from the radar mast of the Westbank suggest that on the Westbank the mast was slightly offset to starboard. As far as I can tell on this one it appears to be set top dead centre. I can guarantee that my shots would have been taken with no distorting effect caused by leaning out. I would have been too petrified.
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  #263  
Old 14th March 2010, 19:19
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The Bank Line "Copra Run"......

Technically, the 'copra run' was the homeward voyage from the Eastern or Western Pacific Islands to the UK/Continent carrying bulk copra in the cargo holds and bulk coconut oil in the deeptanks.
Details (West Pacific)- Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea via Suez, and
(East Pacific) - Fiji, Tongas, Western Samoa (and half-yearly the Line Islands and Tarawa) via Panama. European port of discharge: Bromborough, Greenock, London, Rotterdam and Hamburg (mostly consigned to Lever Brothers or British Oil and Cake Mills).
Copra Boats were usually defined as those ships with six cargo deeptanks: the three "Compass point" Class of 1947; the six "Beaverbank" Class of 1953; the four "Willowbank" Class of 1960 the two "Forresbank" Class of 1962 and the two "Hollybank" Class of 1964.
By the time the six "Corabank" Class of 1973 came along the service was generally referred to as the South Pacific Service (SoPac).
The Copra Run was popular because it was the best chance of getting an out-and-back voyage from and to Europe - a six-months 'short (by Bank Line standards!) voyage' instead of a two-year run based on liner services from Calcutta and tramp cargoes.
How the ships got to the Islands was either by means of an outward voyage from the U.S. Gulf to New Zealand or Australia or (after 1961) the outwards direct service from North Europe to Northern Australia, Papua New Guinea, the Solomons and the French Western Pacific dependencies.
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  #264  
Old 14th March 2010, 19:28
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Wirelessman ,"what is the copra run" old son you will have opened the flood gates from dozens of Bankies,to me it meant that we were on our way home after 18-24 months and invarably heading for bromborough.
Whilst loading one would be continually attacked by little green copra bugs a million times worse than the scottish midgie.

jim
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  #265  
Old 14th March 2010, 19:36
Johnnietwocoats Johnnietwocoats is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alistair Macnab View Post
Technically, the 'copra run' was the homeward voyage from the Eastern or Western Pacific Islands to the UK/Continent carrying bulk copra in the cargo holds and bulk coconut oil in the deeptanks.
Details (West Pacific)- Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea via Suez, and
(East Pacific) - Fiji, Tongas, Western Samoa (and half-yearly the Line Islands and Tarawa) via Panama. European port of discharge: Bromborough, Greenock, London, Rotterdam and Hamburg (mostly consigned to Lever Brothers or British Oil and Cake Mills).
Copra Boats were usually defined as those ships with six cargo deeptanks: the three "Compass point" Class of 1947; the six "Beaverbank" Class of 1953; the four "Willowbank" Class of 1960 the two "Forresbank" Class of 1962 and the two "Hollybank" Class of 1964.
By the time the six "Corabank" Class of 1973 came along the service was generally referred to as the South Pacific Service (SoPac).
The Copra Run was popular because it was the best chance of getting an out-and-back voyage from and to Europe - a six-months 'short (by Bank Line standards!) voyage' instead of a two-year run based on liner services from Calcutta and tramp cargoes.
How the ships got to the Islands was either by means of an outward voyage from the U.S. Gulf to New Zealand or Australia or (after 1961) the outwards direct service from North Europe to Northern Australia, Papua New Guinea, the Solomons and the French Western Pacific dependencies.
Good description Alistair...

That was true unless one of the Copra ships was shanghied by a Charter....

Example "Eastbank" 12 month trip.

Or unless one was transferred in Australia to facilitate Bank Lines Repatriation scheme.... LOL..... "Foylebank" to "Fleetbank" 14 month trip.....

TC
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  #266  
Old 15th March 2010, 00:04
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i suppose when needed it was any old ship ,such as the maple bank had been out 16 monthe then booked for the run home Figi,Apia and Nucklofofa,we were there when the queen and philip turned up dec 53 and we had if my memory serves 2 deep tanks ,or was it 4.

jim
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  #267  
Old 15th March 2010, 04:02
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Alistair Macnab Alistair Macnab is offline  
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Wandering Copra Boats....

I too, was mislead. "Fleetbank" maiden voyage in 1953-1955, India- River Plate and India-WCSA, several sequential voyages. Paid off in Port Sudan.
"Laganbank" maiden voyage in 1955, India-Africa Line, paid off in Durban.
Didn't get a genuine Copra Run until "Laganbank" (again) in 1963.
Before that was always on the Foreign Legion ships, two-year trips!
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  #268  
Old 15th March 2010, 19:22
China hand China hand is offline  
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Convenience played a part also. If some mishap called for a call Europe-wards and a berth was available, slotting into a copra run at least made a profit of sorts, even for a two tank ship. Firbank in 1961 comes to mind.
Thought: Does ANY Bank Line apprentice have fond thoughts about deep tanks??
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  #269  
Old 15th March 2010, 20:07
Johnnietwocoats Johnnietwocoats is offline  
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Originally Posted by China hand View Post
Convenience played a part also. If some mishap called for a call Europe-wards and a berth was available, slotting into a copra run at least made a profit of sorts, even for a two tank ship. Firbank in 1961 comes to mind.
Thought: Does ANY Bank Line apprentice have fond thoughts about deep tanks??

I still have the Caustic Soda burn scars on my shoulders........
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  #270  
Old 15th March 2010, 22:56
dick burrow dick burrow is offline  
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bolts

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I still have the Caustic Soda burn scars on my shoulders........
aye johnnie so have i on my wrists, when it got into your gloves, also what about the 144 nuts and bolts on each lid to keep tightening down till no leaks??
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  #271  
Old 16th March 2010, 02:32
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Alistair Macnab Alistair Macnab is offline  
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Deep Tank Lids....

And before neoprene packing there was greasy hemp rope that had to be laid around each bolt all the way around the lids - all six of them! What about the relaying of the heating coils? Every trip the coil circuit got shorter as it was necessary to cut and re-thread the steam joints. Did anyone count the bolts? 144? It seemed much more!
Can you imagine the casual and careless overside discharging of caustic, oily slops from tank cleaning? We'd all be hung from the yard arm today! Was a six months trip worth it all?
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  #272  
Old 16th March 2010, 02:45
Johnnietwocoats Johnnietwocoats is offline  
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aye johnnie so have i on my wrists, when it got into your gloves, also what about the 144 nuts and bolts on each lid to keep tightening down till no leaks??
Or down in the tanks when the Steam was running through the Steam Pipes and we sat on top of them to tighten the Universal Joints so they didn't leak......

Ahhh the sweet smell of Caustic and Steam and then having your shore leave cancelled in Samoa because you were tired and worn out and you didn't get to the Fo'castle the same time as the Harry Tate, who was spruced up like a wee Peacock...., to drop the anchor

Ahhh the Good old Days...........

JTC
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  #273  
Old 16th March 2010, 08:33
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Alan Rawlinson Alan Rawlinson is offline
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Deep Tank Blues...

Quote:
Originally Posted by China hand View Post
Convenience played a part also. If some mishap called for a call Europe-wards and a berth was available, slotting into a copra run at least made a profit of sorts, even for a two tank ship. Firbank in 1961 comes to mind.
Thought: Does ANY Bank Line apprentice have fond thoughts about deep tanks??

Good Question!

Must have been a masochist if they have. I recall the b..... lids and the multi nuts for the hatch, which most chippies could cheefully tackle while we looked on or made a token effort.. Then later, as mate, worrying about the poxy ullage which slowly increased in the cold weather, and keeping the steam on to stop the oil solidifying. Worst of all, the occasional fitting of the steam pipes which had been removed for some reason, and the cleaning nightmare prior to loading copra... Am I also right in thinking that sulphur was sometimes put down the deeptanks, presumably when an oil cargo was not on offer? Alistair, help!

P.S. I can also remember mixed feelings in Aus / N.Z. ports discharging and half hoping we would NOT return with copra, but go off somewhere with grain.

Last edited by Alan Rawlinson; 16th March 2010 at 08:38..
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  #274  
Old 16th March 2010, 09:51
kwg kwg is offline
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Fleetbank...Only time ever in BL as an Appy did any bridge watches...2 weeks from L/pool taking and recording deep tank temps, 3 each tank, top/middle/bottom, every 2 hrs. If I remember right we accessed via the tank sounding caps. Middle of winter and the line turned to candle wax as it left the pipe. The Old Man (C.H. say no more) went ballistic if any oil drips were on the wooden decking.

That oil was the best 'sun tanning' lotion ever, everyone ended up with a deep golden tan, but smelt like a bounty bar.
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  #275  
Old 16th March 2010, 11:29
Joe C Joe C is offline  
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Originally Posted by Alan Rawlinson View Post
Good Question!

Must have been a masochist if they have. I recall the b..... lids and the multi nuts for the hatch, which most chippies could cheefully tackle while we looked on or made a token effort.. Then later, as mate, worrying about the poxy ullage which slowly increased in the cold weather, and keeping the steam on to stop the oil solidifying. Worst of all, the occasional fitting of the steam pipes which had been removed for some reason, and the cleaning nightmare prior to loading copra... Am I also right in thinking that sulphur was sometimes put down the deeptanks, presumably when an oil cargo was not on offer? Alistair, help!

P.S. I can also remember mixed feelings in Aus / N.Z. ports discharging and half hoping we would NOT return with copra, but go off somewhere with grain.
I sailed as a first tripper with Jim Dudley(I hope I've got the name right) and shall we say he was a little portly.He had to squeeze through the "manholes" to get into the tanks and did not enjoy the experience at all as you can imagine.
We got on very well together which was just as well as I met him about a year later and he was about six feet tall and built like a brick "outhouse"
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