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  #51  
Old 15th August 2010, 15:52
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Trampshipman Trampshipman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spongebob View Post
Robert,that "News of the World " paper must have been luxury alongside those shiny squares of Jeyes TP

Bob
Yeah.....but it always left you with a black a-se !
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  #52  
Old 15th August 2010, 17:41
borderreiver borderreiver is offline  
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How about British no 3. Mrs border reiver still handing me the polish and duster now also the mop. Now expects cup of tea in bed.
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  #53  
Old 15th August 2010, 19:58
muldonaich muldonaich is offline  
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Originally Posted by nalayarb View Post
I have experienced most of the inspection habits written about, but the sneakiest was a captain who carried a small srewdriver to delve down the plugholes to see if he could find a stray hair. If anyone was caught twice with this they were logged. This was on an iron ore carrier!
bet you it was one of houlders
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  #54  
Old 21st August 2010, 00:34
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Donald McGhee Donald McGhee is offline  
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Donaldsons had their inspection on Sunday and the Old man, Chief Steward and mate would troop around in their best blues. One Chief Steward, Alec Barr on the Colina would always use a razor blade and run it down the basin splash back and any formica surfaces and if it had any "residue' would jump up and down, screaming "Filth, filth"!!

A real toerag he was and what a crawler. The old man was a bit of a **** at times too, Bill Joyce, wonder what they were on then, as cocaine etc was just in its infancy in the mid sixties?

Crazy behaviour designed to make the apprentices look stupid and aimed to victimise. The cabin was in all respects very clean, but they just had to find something, what would be wrong with saying "well done, clean cabin", but it never happened..
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  #55  
Old 22nd August 2010, 20:25
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Originally Posted by Donald McGhee View Post
Donaldsons had their inspection on Sunday and the Old man, Chief Steward and mate would troop around in their best blues. One Chief Steward, Alec Barr on the Colina would always use a razor blade and run it down the basin splash back and any formica surfaces and if it had any "residue' would jump up and down, screaming "Filth, filth"!!

A real toerag he was and what a crawler. The old man was a bit of a **** at times too, Bill Joyce, wonder what they were on then, as cocaine etc was just in its infancy in the mid sixties?

Crazy behaviour designed to make the apprentices look stupid and aimed to victimise. The cabin was in all respects very clean, but they just had to find something, what would be wrong with saying "well done, clean cabin", but it never happened..
March of the Unemployed then off to the cabin for G&Ts bullsh*t

Ray
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  #56  
Old 22nd August 2010, 20:49
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Originally Posted by Burned Toast View Post
March of the Unemployed then off to the cabin for G&Ts bullsh*t

Ray
Ray,
But they didn't see it that way.
It was to some of them a necessary ritual designed to put us firmly in our place.
On one ship I was on, Blue Funnel's Memnon, the Chief Officer would check that you had emptied the ashtray which was housed in your bunkshelf. If you had forgotten to carry out this essential task, he would empty the contents all over your pillow.
This was in 1960, I would guess that attitudes improved over the years since then.
Regards,
Pat.
PS, I hope you are practicing your breadmaking skills as recently
instructed by HM Coastguard!
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  #57  
Old 22nd August 2010, 22:04
randcmackenzie randcmackenzie is offline  
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[It was to some of them a necessary ritual designed to put us firmly in our place.]

Pat, I have to disagree, though in some cases it may have been true.

It was certainly a ritual, but not one designed by those who carried it out.
Remember too that officers' cabins were also inspected.

It was and is a statutory requirement that all accommodation and stores were inspected regularly, and a log book entry to that effect was required.

On top of that, if carried out properly, it ensured that all spaces were cleaned at least weekly, and that no taps or toilets were leaking fresh water, electrical fittings were undamaged, etc etc.

Additionally, if the senior PO was invited to attend at the spaces under his control, any deficiencies could be pointed out, and there was also an opportunity to ask if he or anyone had any compaints.

B/R
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  #58  
Old 22nd August 2010, 22:22
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Originally Posted by randcmackenzie View Post
[It was to some of them a necessary ritual designed to put us firmly in our place.]

Pat, I have to disagree, though in some cases it may have been true.

It was certainly a ritual, but not one designed by those who carried it out.
Remember too that officers' cabins were also inspected.

It was and is a statutory requirement that all accommodation and stores were inspected regularly, and a log book entry to that effect was required.

On top of that, if carried out properly, it ensured that all spaces were cleaned at least weekly, and that no taps or toilets were leaking fresh water, electrical fittings were undamaged, etc etc.

Additionally, if the senior PO was invited to attend at the spaces under his control, any deficiencies could be pointed out, and there was also an opportunity to ask if he or anyone had any compaints.

B/R
Of course, you are correct, and I sailed on many ships were the weekly inspection was carried out in a low key and less formal, but fully effective manner.
Blue Funnel felt it was necessary to carry out a formal inspection of the accomodation from top to bottom, six days a week. as has been described by others, the captain accompanied by the chief of each department, the ship's doctor/male nurse, and the bosun, (all wearing white gloves on some ships), would process through the galley, store rooms, bathrooms, messrooms and all the cabins, even those where the watch below were asleep. It was greatly resented by many of the crew, especially those who had come to BF from other companies, and was seen as pure bullsh**, designed to bolster the self esteem of the inspectors.
However, having said this, I still maintain that they were a fine shipping company.
Best regards,
Pat
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  #59  
Old 22nd August 2010, 22:31
muldonaich muldonaich is offline  
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Originally Posted by Pat Kennedy View Post
Of course, you are correct, and I sailed on many ships were the weekly inspection was carried out in a low key and less formal, but fully effective manner.
Blue Funnel felt it was necessary to carry out a formal inspection of the accomodation from top to bottom, six days a week. as has been described by others, the captain accompanied by the chief of each department, the ship's doctor/male nurse, and the bosun, (all wearing white gloves on some ships), would process through the galley, store rooms, bathrooms, messrooms and all the cabins, even those where the watch below were asleep. It was greatly resented by many of the crew, especially those who had come to BF from other companies, and was seen as pure bullsh**, designed to bolster the self esteem of the inspectors.
However, having said this, I still maintain that they were a fine shipping company.
Best regards,
Pat
still do not understand the emtying of the ashtray on a pillow never heard of that in all my years at sea.
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  #60  
Old 22nd August 2010, 22:38
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Originally Posted by muldonaich View Post
still do not understand the emtying of the ashtray on a pillow never heard of that in all my years at sea.
Nevertheless that it what he did.
Someone who could confirm this is Dave Molyneux who is secretary of the Blue Funnel Association, and who was a steward on that Memnon on the same voyage.
Regards,
Pat
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  #61  
Old 22nd August 2010, 22:46
muldonaich muldonaich is offline  
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i believe you pat but where did people like him come from kev.
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  #62  
Old 22nd August 2010, 23:04
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Originally Posted by muldonaich View Post
still do not understand the emtying of the ashtray on a pillow never heard of that in all my years at sea.
On some of the older ships that I sailed on the ash trays were attached to the bunk light or to the bulkhead the ash tray could not be removed for emptying it only tilted. To empty the ash tray with out messing up your linen took getting a container capture the ashes while tilting it or using a vacuum cleaner. I never did see any one empty the ash tray on purpose and dump the mess on the pillow during the weekly sanitation inspections that I was required to attend. There must be some pieces of work doing the inspections on some ships.

But I have seen the cadets and new BR's make the mess just before the weekly inspections. The linen closet was across the way from my office and there was a last minute rush to get another pillow case.
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  #63  
Old 23rd August 2010, 09:40
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Originally Posted by muldonaich View Post
i believe you pat but where did people like him come from kev.
I cant remember the name of this particular Chief Officer, but he was a piece of work.
He resembled the actor, James Robertson Justice, both in appearance and demeanour.
He instituted a beer ration for deck ratings of two cans per day, and this also caused resentment because the Chief Steward was much more liberal and allowed his lads four a day.
No doubt he became a Blue Funnel master in due course, I'm sure someone on this site will remember him.
Regards,
Pat

Last edited by Pat Kennedy; 23rd August 2010 at 10:45..
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  #64  
Old 23rd August 2010, 09:56
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The Official log book still requires the Master & Chief officer to confirm that weekly inspections of accommodation have been carried out........... Its a long time since I have seen a formal Saturday/Sunday walk around . However the norm these days is that the condition of the vessel is very carefully checked all the time. A couple of years ago we had an office chap come around and admired the pristine nature of the accommodation, its polished decks and spotless bulkheads. ' Good to see your stewards are doing a good job' was his comment............... Those boats had never had either stewards or anyone remotely close! with only 11 men on the ship it was always down to everyone on board to keep her like that. The deck crew playing 'Peggy' at night to strip and polish alleyways, Everyone else doing there own areas. Shows the great pride that British Seafarers still have in their ships, always a marvel to me seeing the way many people were treated in the 1980's and 90's

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  #65  
Old 23rd August 2010, 10:30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Balls View Post
The Official log book still requires the Master & Chief officer to confirm that weekly inspections of accommodation have been carried out........... Its a long time since I have seen a formal Saturday/Sunday walk around . However the norm these days is that the condition of the vessel is very carefully checked all the time. A couple of years ago we had an office chap come around and admired the pristine nature of the accommodation, its polished decks and spotless bulkheads. ' Good to see your stewards are doing a good job' was his comment............... Those boats had never had either stewards or anyone remotely close! with only 11 men on the ship it was always down to everyone on board to keep her like that. The deck crew playing 'Peggy' at night to strip and polish alleyways, Everyone else doing there own areas. Shows the great pride that British Seafarers still have in their ships, always a marvel to me seeing the way many people were treated in the 1980's and 90's
Must agree Nick, All Offshore boats I have sailed on everyone kept their accomadation clean, and the sailors did a great job of the outside and inside of the vessel

Ray
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  #66  
Old 23rd August 2010, 21:16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat Kennedy View Post
Ray,
But they didn't see it that way.
It was to some of them a necessary ritual designed to put us firmly in our place.
On one ship I was on, Blue Funnel's Memnon, the Chief Officer would check that you had emptied the ashtray which was housed in your bunkshelf. If you had forgotten to carry out this essential task, he would empty the contents all over your pillow.
This was in 1960, I would guess that attitudes improved over the years since then.
Regards,
Pat.
PS, I hope you are practicing your breadmaking skills as recently
instructed by HM Coastguard!

Pat I did quite a few years on the march of the unemployed I have upset quite a few with this is a bloody waste of time Mostly either the Mate or myself would do a daily walk round the accommodation, I would know if the food places were clean and vermin free no need for the Sunday walk Ray
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  #67  
Old 9th October 2010, 21:38
sagalout sagalout is offline  
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We used to cal it galley ports day on Prince Line & scrubed the galley down on Thursday night for white glove & mirrors inspection on Friday morning!
I can remember being in Southampton dock when an inspection was called didn't normally do it in port on Port Line] & as the steward was so p****d we done it all for him dressed him in his white coat & hung him by his jackets hook on the mess door. What a trip round the coast that was.......
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  #68  
Old 9th October 2010, 23:05
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Sunday, at 1030 hours, as Chief Engineer, I would put the steaming bonnet on, and go on inspection with the Captain, Mate and Chief Steward.
On a particular ship, we had the little Filipino Chief Steward who was terrified of the Captain. During inspection of the store room’s, the Captain would tap on the Chief Stewards forehead with his knuckle, shouting, and “Is there anybody in there”?
The final outcome, due to his stressed out condition, the Chief Steward had a big argument with the Cook, about the Sunday dinner menu, the Chief Steward ended up dead, frenzied knife attack by the Cook in the galley.
This happened at sea, next port of call Singapore, port authorities did not want to know.
Cook paid off and sent home to the Philippines.
It turned out that this was the second murder he had committed.

Watch your back.

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  #69  
Old 9th October 2010, 23:27
muldonaich muldonaich is offline  
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why did you let a bully like him get away with doing things like that does not really say much about you as a senior off .
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  #70  
Old 9th October 2010, 23:41
Boatman25 Boatman25 is offline  
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Originally Posted by muldonaich View Post
why did you let a bully like him get away with doing things like that does not really say much about you as a senior off .
I think that it is easy for you Mr muldonaich to make judgements now on what happened then but perhaps not easy for Mr machpail to do anything about it at the time. So what makes you the judge and jury.
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  #71  
Old 10th October 2010, 00:35
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I think that it is easy for you Mr muldonaich to make judgements now on what happened then but perhaps not easy for Mr machpail to do anything about it at the time. So what makes you the judge and jury.
i think mr macphail is sure to answer himself and i was not being judge and jury but sadly thats how bullys get away with these things and the poor fillipino would be terrified to lose his job but instead he lost his life how sad.
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  #72  
Old 10th October 2010, 08:49
John Cassels John Cassels is offline  
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i think mr macphail is sure to answer himself and i was not being judge and jury but sadly thats how bullys get away with these things and the poor fillipino would be terrified to lose his job but instead he lost his life how sad.
Quite correct Kev.
Mr.MacPhail as a cheng. should have had a quiet word with the
Master , nothing wrong with that and perfectly acceptable.
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  #73  
Old 10th October 2010, 10:57
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This doesn't come under the Captains Inspections heading really, but is all to do with smartness and cleanliness.
On one BP tanker I was on, in the engine room, just outside the Control Room were two small steam recipricating pumps. Vertically mounted on a bulkhead if I recall correctly. One was always huffing, puffing and clanking away at a slow and steady rate. They were obviously twins, but the other one was spotless, the paint gleamed, the joints didn't leak and it ran as smooth as silk. It was touched on pain of death. It was the C/Es pride and joy, no one dared touch it, let alone use it. If I recall correctly the only time it ever got used was when the C/E came down to the pit with a visitor and he could show them how a steam recip pump should work. The Chief did all the work on that pump himself, just to keep his hand in I suppose.
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  #74  
Old 10th October 2010, 11:32
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Hi Butters

Re.
Quote:
Masters inspection of all accommodation , galley , storerooms and outhouses
In Union Co I thought we wrote 'sidehouses', I might be wrong. I think it was also entered in the Deck Log and underlined in Red, I might be wrong again though.
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  #75  
Old 10th October 2010, 12:54
Ron Hamilton Ron Hamilton is offline  
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As a 16yr old QMs Peggy in '47 on the Samaria , The entourage crowded into our small mess-room which I kept spotless , & the next week the ships doctor had noted the date on the newspaper lining I had in a cupboard & it hadn't been changed for which I was reprimanded ! On the D.L.Harper an Esso tanker on the warm engine room bulkhead which ran along the the alleyway opposite our cabins aft ,we had a clothes line rigged , & in the cleaning rags that were supplied there was often the most delightful exotic lingerie which we collected & strung them all along the alleyway , much to the consternation of the Captains entourage on inspection day ! Ron
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