Chief Stewards good and bad - Page 3 - Ships Nostalgia
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Chief Stewards good and bad

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  #51  
Old 21st September 2012, 18:09
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Ray Mac Ray Mac is offline  
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Originally Posted by alan ward View Post
#46 Too much time listening to and believing scuttle butt,thieve or belly rob and you don`t keep your job.It was to our advantage to always do the best we could to look after you,feed you,treat the horrible diseases you picked up,arrange your subs,toilet paper,soap,keep the bond,accounts,port entry,get you paid accurately and make sure you got home.What a bunch of thieving bastards we were.

Should note bite Alan Let them live in ignorance, part timers.

Ray
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  #52  
Old 21st September 2012, 19:24
MARINEJOCKY MARINEJOCKY is offline  
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...and the money made from selling dunnage from the deck and scrap from the engine room was sent back to the company ?.
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  #53  
Old 21st September 2012, 21:08
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...and the money made from selling dunnage from the deck and scrap from the engine room was sent back to the company ?.
Don,t forget the deposit on the empty 40 gallon oil drums !
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  #54  
Old 21st September 2012, 22:06
MARINEJOCKY MARINEJOCKY is offline  
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John, were you with us when we did that ?. or selling one gallon of paint and four gallons of water in the "un-opened" five gallon cans when passing thru' Suez. No wonder the muslims hate us so much
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  #55  
Old 22nd September 2012, 09:02
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Originally Posted by MARINEJOCKY View Post
John, were you with us when we did that ?. or selling one gallon of paint and four gallons of water in the "un-opened" five gallon cans when passing thru' Suez. No wonder the muslims hate us so much
No I am afraid not. What I was referring to was the "fiddling" that Chief Stewards were accused of. The engineroom used to get 40 gall.drums of oil on board in Singapore with a deposit on the drums.When returned the deposit was used by them for a "piss up"Surely if the Chief was honest it should have been returned to the company.I saw a lot of fiddling among department heads in my time at sea,but the Chief Steward always got the blame.When a master retired he got a holiday in Hong kong living in the Shipchandlers house.The Chief Steward didn,t.All we ever bought from him was fresh veg and salads for about a month
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  #56  
Old 22nd September 2012, 15:59
Rogerfrench Rogerfrench is offline  
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I can hardly believe that this thread has gone on so long without at least one post from an ex-ED guy referring to Ken Onions, and parrot Hook.

I knew Ken on the Sekondi, great chap, loads of fun, and a good host ashore, too.
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  #57  
Old 22nd September 2012, 18:06
MARINEJOCKY MARINEJOCKY is offline  
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and what I was referring too was the 15 tons of oil that came onboard in 50 gallon drums and we flogged the drums in the canal which paid for a good few parties
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  #58  
Old 22nd September 2012, 19:48
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A joint effort in BF to avid any misunderstandings - Oil drums "sold" for soft shell crabs and satay sticks in Indonesia, other places a gash fund to buy beer and steaks for a barbecue (for the entire crew). Lord, I miss the satay and peanut sauce! Last ate it in an Indonesian restaurant in Amsterdam in 2003 with the family! I ordered, everything got scoffed double quick. I called the waitress over,"Same again miss!", "Yes - everything and double satay!".
Rgds.
Dave
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  #59  
Old 23rd September 2012, 00:06
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Originally Posted by Rogerfrench View Post
I can hardly believe that this thread has gone on so long without at least one post from an ex-ED guy referring to Ken Onions, and parrot Hook.

I knew Ken on the Sekondi, great chap, loads of fun, and a good host ashore, too.

When EDs were in the process of laying people off, Ken joined Harrison's. Sadly he died soon after .... don't know about Hook.

Derek
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  #60  
Old 23rd September 2012, 00:08
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Makko,

Denholm's (and others??) H-K Chinese crews! - You would have done a double header for the standard Sunday lunch. Bugger roast Tom turkey - "Nasi Goreng" - actually a fusion dish with pork Satay, special fried rice and a fried egg and often 'seconds'.

How I miss that! And how my doctor says I should continue so doing!.

Last edited by Varley; 23rd September 2012 at 10:48..
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  #61  
Old 23rd September 2012, 01:26
oldman 80 oldman 80 is offline  
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Ah Denholm once again.
Yes most of the Chinese crewed ships fed very well, but the best feeders in my view were the two Chemical Tankers - Venturer and Explorer.
Both had Indian Crews (ex Mckinnon Mckenzie) but the Chief Steward was British.
The two regulars were Phil Milne - ex Bibby's and Jimmy Prentice - the finest Chief Stewards you could wish for, exceptionally popular with one and all. The Feeding was excellent, with curry three times a day (as a choice), vegetable curry at Breakfast. Those curries were just magnificent - absolutely they were, so much so my stomach is just screaming out for one now. Sadly I don't think they could be replicated today.

Last edited by oldman 80; 23rd September 2012 at 10:01.. Reason: spelling/typo
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  #62  
Old 23rd September 2012, 02:10
John Dryden John Dryden is offline  
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I always remember my first captains inspection as an appy in Bank Line.The first man in was the Chief Steward followed by the Master.That alone said more than what you have for dinner.
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  #63  
Old 23rd September 2012, 02:58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Varley View Post
Makko,

Denholm's (and others??) H-K Chinese crews! - You would have done a double header for the standard Sunday lucnch. Bugger roast Tom turkey - "Nasi Goreng" - actually a fusion dish with pork Satay, special fried rice and a fried egg and often 'seconds'.

How I miss that! And how my doctor says I should continue so doing!.
Hey Varley,
Thanks for reminding me - I forgot Nasi Goreng with chile sauce, eat with a spoon! Also real "baltis", literally buckets of rice and curry for Sunday lunch.
Now, I have to rustle up something tomorrow to surprise the family!
Rgds.
Dave
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  #64  
Old 23rd September 2012, 10:41
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Nasi Goreng ... foreign muck apart from the fried egg sitting on top. Apart from that, some of my best friends were Chief Stewards ... a much maligned breed.

John T
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  #65  
Old 23rd September 2012, 10:47
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- I forgot Nasi Goreng with chile sauce, eat with a spoon!
Dave, I wish I could join you but that's too long a hop (I won't even go to London save family emergencies, or their conclusions anyway). Don't forget the peanuts with the satay sauce.

As an aside - my paternal grandparents were married in Mexico and favourite uncle 'Bruv' was born there. Seems there was quite a market for ex-pats there at the turn of last century GP was with the Neuchatel Asphalt Co (perhaps still then the marvellously names Neuchatel Bituminous Rock Co.) so I suppose he was metalling Mexico's roads. I have a newsclipping of a Great Uncle arriving on Californian to visit in 1909 - strange then that the album does not mention Titanic - obviously none of the family aboard!.

David V

Last edited by Varley; 23rd September 2012 at 13:59..
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  #66  
Old 23rd September 2012, 11:17
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I have a newsclipping of a Great Uncle arriving on Californian to visit in 1909 - strange then that the album does not mention Titanic - obviously non of the family aboard!
Maybe not so strange. Arrival of Californian 1909; maiden voyage of Titanic 1912. Back to the Future?
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  #67  
Old 23rd September 2012, 12:44
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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This was posted elsewhere in error so I`ll try again.
How did a Chief Steward obtain access to a deck store to nick a mooring rope and how long did it take this superhuman to carry it ashore with no-one noticing?I suspect as well as his other shortcomings terminal bullshitting may well be added.
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  #68  
Old 23rd September 2012, 12:56
guinnessmick guinnessmick is offline  
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i did not say that all c/stewards where at it but if the cap fits so to speak
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  #69  
Old 23rd September 2012, 13:57
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Maybe not so strange. Arrival of Californian 1909; maiden voyage of Titanic 1912. Back to the Future?
Ron, I would agree but several other world events got in (death of the Britishly wifed Kaiser and on up to and beyond WWI) wouldn't you have put in a clipping associating the two ships if you had a family link with one of them? I think we were too big headed to consider even an entry along the lines of "Maritime disaster, not many Varleys drowned" - poor Grandmother joined us in 1901 from posh Scottish stock - she barely gets a mention!)
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  #70  
Old 24th September 2012, 20:44
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Hi Varley,
Yes, there were a lot of expats involved in mining, cement, oil and other heavy industries to bolster the experience. I posted on a pic in the gallery regarding the Cornish mine workers brought in to Pachuca and the fact that the league football team is one of the oldest association football clubs in the world (Pachuca "Tuzos" or "moles"!).
With the new mining technologies, there has been a resurgence in expats in specialized jobs. I think many people would be surprised to find where their forebears got too!
Rgds.
Dave
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  #71  
Old 24th September 2012, 20:57
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This was posted elsewhere in error so I`ll try again.
How did a Chief Steward obtain access to a deck store to nick a mooring rope and how long did it take this superhuman to carry it ashore with no-one noticing?I suspect as well as his other shortcomings terminal bullshitting may well be added.
Quite simply he organised the lowering of the mooring rope from
the poop to a waiting boat in the dead of night with assistance from his accomplices.
Our Dicky, was no superman, but he was crafty and resourceful.
There are members of SN who sailed with him and can testify to his larcenous instincts, and his charm, he could talk the knickers off a nun!
Pat
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  #72  
Old 24th September 2012, 21:10
MARINEJOCKY MARINEJOCKY is offline  
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Do nuns wear nickers in Liverpool ?
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  #73  
Old 25th September 2012, 07:15
Old Janner Old Janner is online now  
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Nuns

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Do nuns wear nickers in Liverpool ?
How do you know ?

OJ
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  #74  
Old 25th September 2012, 13:31
MARINEJOCKY MARINEJOCKY is offline  
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Pat K. is the expert or so it seems, on that subject so ask him LOL
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  #75  
Old 25th September 2012, 18:32
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Pat K. is the expert or so it seems, on that subject so ask him LOL
My knowledge of nun's undergarments is non existent.
Having been taught by nuns in infant school, I learned quickly to fear them and avoid them where possible.
Those I knew were shrouded from head to foot in black gowns which exposed their face and hands only.
The possibility of underwear never entered my mind, and even now many years later the thought gives me the heebie jeebies.
The expression to charm the knickers off a nun is an old scouse saying, but I doubt if anyone ever did it, or would want to.
Pat
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