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  #51  
Old 25th July 2012, 09:27
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Re post #44.On our way further south we always stop for an overnighter in Calais after the drive to Dover and the ferry crossing stopping at the small parking area near to the beach and the harbour entrance.The bar/cafe owner there is genuine character,always half pissed smoking away behind the bar with his missus and all the waiters following suit.We`ve tried speaking in french to him but he won`t have it,he said`I don`t mind the English they can`t speak French but they have a go,what really gets to me are the Canadians who think they speak French and don`t but worse of all are the Americans from Lousiana God knows what they speak`
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  #52  
Old 6th August 2012, 05:27
Arthur C Arthur C is offline  
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Hi All,
Iam an ex Houlder /FW, 3/E & went touring around UK in a motor home last year, went to St Ives & at a noted local Pastry Shop asked for a Tiddy Oggie, the guy looked at me & said we don't call them that here.... they are called Cornish Pasties. They were delicious, You must use Skirt Steak for the meat & Swede or veg. similar + potatoes, but usually contain no peas or carrots.

As you all know these meals in a pastry case were given to the Tin Miners long ago for their meal while working, long live Traditional recipes.

Arthur C. (Perth, W Oz)
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  #53  
Old 8th August 2012, 20:15
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Best pasty? Grandmothers....from Polruan
2nd best pasty? Mothers.....from Fowey

Simple really.
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  #54  
Old 9th August 2012, 03:44
Arthur C Arthur C is offline  
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Hi cajef,
Thanks for the pasty recipe, holidayed in Cornwall last year & this recipe you gave is the traditional one, as we got lots of advice from locals all over this lovely county, from the 'Janors' (Cornish Natives) to an Emmett (Outsider).

Arthur C. (Ex 3/e) [this is a great thread, thanks to all you nice people].
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  #55  
Old 9th August 2012, 23:43
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Arthur,

Just for your information emmett in the Cornish means ant....guess 'twas all about the english holiday makers all swarming around the place back in the day.
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  #56  
Old 10th August 2012, 08:39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kernewekmarnor View Post
Arthur,

Just for your information emmett in the Cornish means ant....guess 'twas all about the english holiday makers all swarming around the place back in the day.
A good word, but it isn't Cornish. It comes from Old English via Middle English. What about 'grockle'?
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  #57  
Old 10th August 2012, 10:32
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"Bl**dy Grockles and their Caravans blocking all the Devon Lanes" approx. Quote from the Film "The System" 1962. Thought to have come from the clown Grock who lived in Torquay and referred to tourists as Grockles meaning Little Grocks, referring to there comedic ways and clownish bumbling ways................pete
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  #58  
Old 10th August 2012, 10:39
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As a matter of interest Grockles are sometimes referred to as haemorrhoids because they are Pink, come in bunches and they're a pain in the A**SE........pete
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  #59  
Old 10th August 2012, 10:44
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Last year I had a holiday at Hamilton Island in the Great Barrier Reef. Everyone there, including the workers, was a blow in as there are no "locals" of any longevity. Very refreshing to not have any supercilious residents sneering at you while still wanting your money.

A former "Grockle", John T
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  #60  
Old 11th August 2012, 06:34
len mazza len mazza is offline  
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Hi Folks,
Just had the chance to the very pleasant DUTCH baker at the local supermarket what the basic ingridients are for the pastie,will keep an out to see if there is in any change in the product.
Cheers,
Len.
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  #61  
Old 11th August 2012, 08:38
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The Anti-Grockle Tendency

I spent from July to Christmas of 1966 attending a Marine Electronics Diploma course at Plymouth Tech. and greatly enjoyed my time there, often going into Cornwall at weekends to sample the food and drink in the pubs that were recommended each Friday in the local newspaper. MIMCo "had a presence" in Brixham, Falmouth, Looe and Plymouth so later, when I was based in Chelmsford, I often had occasion to visit the area. I found that the people in Devon were generally pretty happy with their lives and lifestyles, whilst on the other side of the Tamar things were rather different.

A common complaint in Cornwall was the injustice that they suffered at the hands of the "bloody English" in general and, in particular those up in London, who took everything but gave them nothing. The holiday home owners and absentee landlords were ruining the county and the retired English were forcing up housing prices. 'Independence from England was what they really needed' seemed to be the theme. This could be construed as 'the English should go back to England - well, just as long as they don't take away the Benefits Office and the dole when they go.' Elsewhere there has always been a healthy disrespect for the performance of the government of the time so the anti-London comments are not surprising. But, outside Cornwall, wherever I travelled within England I never came across another county showing similar resentment to visitors other parts of the country. Certainly not on the Devon side of the river.

Always seemed very odd to me, since without the tourists most Cornish towns would be in a sad way, their railways would have gone completely and there would have been no modern trunk roads, only Cornish lanes, since there would have been nothing to transport. Envy and resentment seem such negative characteristics for a county to adopt.
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  #62  
Old 11th August 2012, 22:53
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Spoken like a true englishman.
course things are different on the other side of the Tamar....
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  #63  
Old 12th August 2012, 20:28
matthew flinders matthew flinders is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kernewekmarnor View Post
Best pasty? Grandmothers....from Polruan
2nd best pasty? Mothers.....from Fowey

Simple really.
In 1961 presumably before all the pasty shop chains the Chief Steward, from Falmouth, had his wife aboard who made delicious pasties. However, as an apprentice I would eat pretty much anything then.
As an aside I liked Timothy Spall's account of the Cornish calling the English Egg Jellys - probably Rock or Polzeath.
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  #64  
Old 12th August 2012, 20:52
Arthur C Arthur C is offline  
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Hi All,
I loved Cornwall, when I visited last year (2011) & enjoyed the laid back easy going way of the Janors, happy, carefree people.
Also I know that the cuisine, The Meal in a Pastry envelope, is not exactly health food, but with a pint of good beer in one hand, a Cornish pasty in the other....
looking out over the lovely view at Carbis Bay (St Ives) on the north coast, or on the south coast looking out on the English Channel from Praa Sands is like being in heaven.

Arthur C. (the Taffy, Aussie)
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  #65  
Old 13th August 2012, 03:05
Ian Harrod Ian Harrod is offline  
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All this correspondence on dumplings, now Cornish pasties. Thank God no-one has mentioned Yorkshire puddings!
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  #66  
Old 13th August 2012, 13:58
ray morgan ray morgan is offline  
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I always remember them being called, "sealed orders" on a ship because you never knew what was in them.
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  #67  
Old 13th August 2012, 14:35
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I may have posted this before, but it's relevant to this thread.

OGGY

When all the World was clean and bright and new,
The mountains, plains and forests all laid out,
Every beast knew exactly what to do,
Browse, graze, predate, instinct removing doubt.

Each woman in her kitchen stood bemused
At earth's abundance, wondering where to start.
The Architect on seeing this devised
For each her basic culinary art.

Rice dishes for the Asiatic hordes,
For Scotsmen porridge, scones and certain kails,
For Scandinavians ample smorgasbords,
And for the French tureens of frogs and snails.

So were created the World's basic dishes,
All in a blink of the Creator's eye,
From vegetables, meats, from loaves and fishes,
'Til all was done. But then there came a cry.

"'Old 'ard me luvver, all the rest may dine
"On these fine dishes, but they just won't do
"For my young fellow, 'ee works down a mine.
"You can't go down a mine with plates of stew.

"He'll need to take it with him in the morning,
"Or else I'll have to drop it down the shaft
"First calling out his name to give a warning.
"He'll catch it in a cloth with cunning craft."

The Architect sat at his desk to think
Of what requirements should be met here,
And dipping a new quill in magic ink
Wrote out the needs to make the problem clear.

A meal for a miner underground,
A fisherman or worker on the land,
A meal substantial, wholesome and all round,
But able to be eaten from the hand

Or carried in a pocket safely wrapped
Inside a woollen sock to keep it warm
And so designed as to be safely dropped
Down a tin mine, and caught there without harm.

And so this splendid meal came to be
Neat, practical and nourishing and tasty,
To eat below, above, on land or sea,
Creation's paragon, The Cornish Pasty.

Copyright: Robert Hilton.
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  #68  
Old 13th August 2012, 15:13
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Cool Cornish Pasties

Quote:
Originally Posted by len mazza View Post
Hi,
Bought two of the above recently here in Napier,only resemblence to the real thing was the shape,can you still get a decent on in the UK.

Cheers, Len.
Hi Len.
You can buy a sort of Cornish Pastie all
over the UK,but you have to go to Devon
or Cornwall for the "real" thing,with the meat,
potatoes and Swede,all in layers,scrumptios,
I make a point of having at least one,every time
that I visit the area.Not cheap any more,over the
three pounds apeice.You can also get them in
Chillie,Marsala,etc etc,but in my opinion,not at all
like the real thing.

Dave Williams
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  #69  
Old 19th August 2012, 14:59
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Originally Posted by Ian Harrod View Post
All this correspondence on dumplings, now Cornish pasties. Thank God no-one has mentioned Yorkshire puddings!
Well since you come to mention them,whatever happened to `proper`yorkshire puddings cooked in smoking hot beef dripping and using a big roasting pan?If it wasn`t for Auntie Bettys tiny little offerings half the world wouldn`t even have seen or tasted one.

Regarding all this separatist movement stuff my Dad Hull born,bred and buttered used to say`They ought to be glad we let `em live;until 848 they paid us to leave `em alone`
`

Last edited by alan ward; 19th August 2012 at 15:02..
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  #70  
Old 20th August 2012, 04:39
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Originally Posted by alan ward View Post
Well since you come to mention them,whatever happened to `proper`yorkshire puddings cooked in smoking hot beef dripping and using a big roasting pan?If it wasn`t for Auntie Bettys tiny little offerings half the world wouldn`t even have seen or tasted one.

Regarding all this separatist movement stuff my Dad Hull born,bred and buttered used to say`They ought to be glad we let `em live;until 848 they paid us to leave `em alone`
`
Cook 'proper' yorkshire pudding most week ends when I am home but use smoking hot goose fat (well do live in Norfolk LOL)
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  #71  
Old 20th August 2012, 06:20
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Quote:
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All this correspondence on dumplings, now Cornish pasties. Thank God no-one has mentioned Yorkshire puddings!
Then there is the lardy cake
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  #72  
Old 20th August 2012, 10:25
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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#70 That`s the spirit of good cooking development,I`d never thought of goose fat but I`ll try it soon thank you.
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  #73  
Old 20th August 2012, 14:18
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#70 That`s the spirit of good cooking development,I`d never thought of goose fat but I`ll try it soon thank you.
Not good for you I am sure but makes great yorkie puds and also roast the potatos in it
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  #74  
Old 20th August 2012, 17:07
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alan ward View Post
Well since you come to mention them,whatever happened to `proper`yorkshire puddings cooked in smoking hot beef dripping and using a big roasting pan?If it wasn`t for Auntie Bettys tiny little offerings half the world wouldn`t even have seen or tasted one.

Regarding all this separatist movement stuff my Dad Hull born,bred and buttered used to say`They ought to be glad we let `em live;until 848 they paid us to leave `em alone`
`
Me old Nanna (was from Hull) used to make them this way, and she used to turn them during cooking, they were without a doubt the best Yorkies I ever tasted, she took the secret to her grave though of how exactly she made them.
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  #75  
Old 23rd December 2014, 03:59
William Clark8 William Clark8 is offline  
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Pasties

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Me old Nanna (was from Hull) used to make them this way, and she used to turn them during cooking, they were without a doubt the best Yorkies I ever tasted, she took the secret to her grave though of how exactly she made them.
We used to call them "Sealed Orders"
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