Car Carrier Modern Express Abandoned In Bay Of Biscay - Ships Nostalgia
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Car Carrier Modern Express Abandoned In Bay Of Biscay

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  #1  
Old 27th January 2016, 10:15
surveychile surveychile is offline  
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Car Carrier Modern Express Abandoned In Bay Of Biscay

As per gcaptain.com

A Panamanian-flagged car carrier has been evacuated after a loss of stability incident in the Bay of Biscay.

Spain’s search and rescue agency Salvamento Maritimo responded Tuesday afternoon following a distress call from the roll-on/roll-off car carrier Modern Express located 148 miles off Cape Ortegal.

All 22 crew members of the ship were evacuated by two Spanish helicopters. Sixteen crew members have been brought to La Coruña airport in northwestern Spain. Another 6 crew were transferred to Celeiro in Portugal. All are in good condition.

The vessel was listing by about 40 degrees, with winds on scene reported to be Force 8 with heavy seas, according to Salvamento Maritimo.

The search and rescue was being coordinated by the Maritime Rescue Co-ordination Centre (MRCC) in Falmouth in the United Kingdom, with help from National Coordination Centre (Madrid). The vessel is believed to have drifted into France’s search and rescue area.

The 10,454 dwt Modern Express was built in 2001 and is 164 meters long. The vessel was sailing from the country of Gabon to Le Havre, France.

Regards

Tomi.
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  #2  
Old 27th January 2016, 10:50
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Interesting. I have just looked on the web and there is a short video of the vessel from a search and rescue aircraft. The audio sound is morse sending code groups, possible Navy/Air force, so someone still using morse!

Hawkey01
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  #3  
Old 27th January 2016, 11:51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hawkey01 View Post
Interesting. I have just looked on the web and there is a short video of the vessel from a search and rescue aircraft. The audio sound is morse sending code groups, possible Navy/Air force, so someone still using morse!

Hawkey01
Would that be 'auto' signal from a locator beacon?
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  #4  
Old 27th January 2016, 12:01
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Presumably someone still has to read it and write it down and even decipher it.

John T
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  #5  
Old 27th January 2016, 12:41
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A repeat of the Cougar Ace and Hoegh Osaka. Remarkably, they were all recovered to sail another day.
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  #6  
Old 27th January 2016, 13:01
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On the day they have just finished salvaging the BALTIC ACE
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  #7  
Old 27th January 2016, 13:36
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These vessels certainly do seem to have a fault. They have auto ballast systems but this should be locked out when sailing. I for one have not read any of the inquiry reports into these incidents. I am happy the crew all got out OK, that is the main thing.
Rgds.
Dave
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  #8  
Old 27th January 2016, 14:08
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I've never sailed in a car carrier, but I imagine one of the biggest problems they face is that if subject to a large angle of heel - for whatever reason - the risk and consequences of a cargo shift are severe.
That is, once everything piles up in one side of the ship there isn't much you can do, as ballast capacity will be limited and you can neither jettison the cargo or move it, as you don't have the equipment or manpower available.
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  #9  
Old 27th January 2016, 14:33
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I've never sailed in a car carrier, but I imagine one of the biggest problems they face is that if subject to a large angle of heel - for whatever reason - the risk and consequences of a cargo shift are severe.
That is, once everything piles up in one side of the ship there isn't much you can do, as ballast capacity will be limited and you can neither jettison the cargo or move it, as you don't have the equipment or manpower available.
Not to mention a lack of transverse bulkheads and the resulting exposure in stability and fire containment.
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  #10  
Old 27th January 2016, 23:08
randcmackenzie randcmackenzie is offline  
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Originally Posted by trotterdotpom View Post
Presumably someone still has to read it and write it down and even decipher it.

John T
I think it was fed in from elsewhere for authenticity - CQ CQ SOS
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  #11  
Old 27th January 2016, 23:43
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Not sure if this is the video Hawkey01 was referring to.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=...&v=PvX0VvcSlLo
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  #12  
Old 28th January 2016, 13:50
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Ray,

thanks for link. I should have done that at the time.

Neville - Hawkey01
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  #13  
Old 28th January 2016, 17:32
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The MAIB report on the Hoegh Osaka is due to be published in March. Let's hope it provides some information that will lead to the prevention of these incidents.
Although, in this case, we might find that the list was caused by cargo shifting in the severe weather rather than a ballasting problem.
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  #14  
Old 28th January 2016, 23:45
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I keep going back to the mention of "lumber" as part of the load ... this being a ro-ro, I have to wonder if that was truck trailers loaded with lumber, and the possibility of the loading straps holding the lumber onto the trailers snapping ... and all that lumber cascading to one side of the deck.
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Old 29th January 2016, 08:14
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"....................Although, in this case, we might find that the list was caused by cargo shifting in the severe weather rather than a ballasting problem.
Surely it is possible to secure vehicles so that they won't shift.
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  #16  
Old 29th January 2016, 09:11
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According to what I have read, the vessel was loaded with mostly lumber... 3600 tons worth. Looks to be a former Hyundai Marine PCC, now running to West Africa.

"Stability Problems" is the quoted cause. Likewise, I've heard that the Hoegh Osaka was a "Ballasting Problem"... My wife and I anxiously await that MAIB report..

I am currently two days off Land's End on a PCC- I am ALWAYS mindful of the list, rolling period, start of what seems like a parametric set of heeling. The
auto-heel on this ship is ALWAYS secured and heeling ballast moved through operator input only..
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Old 29th January 2016, 12:01
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Day Sailor View Post
The MAIB report on the Hoegh Osaka is due to be published in March. Let's hope it provides some information that will lead to the prevention of these incidents.
Although, in this case, we might find that the list was caused by cargo shifting in the severe weather rather than a ballasting problem.
These incidents will continue to occur. The design of these vessels is inherently unstable, as with any Ro-Ro, so their stability is totally reliant upon the operators (even if equipped with automated systems ). They are human and from time to time make mistakes which can be disasterous, or the cargo shifts.
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  #18  
Old 29th January 2016, 22:45
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Wow ... this was during (failed) attempts to get a tow line on today ...

http://i1.wp.com/gcaptain.com/wp-con...41_004_011.jpg
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  #19  
Old 30th January 2016, 15:56
surveychile surveychile is offline  
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Regrettably a very bad idea from owners side to have loaded a pure car carrier ship with cargo not suitable for this type of vessel, clearly a bad decision which may influence in Underwriters at time of indemnify this occurrence.

Regards

Tomi.
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  #20  
Old 31st January 2016, 07:15
steamer659 steamer659 is offline  
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Yes Tomi, I kept thinking that if the lumber was improperly stowed and broke free, what a mess- wonder how they would load it? On maffi's? Flat rack? Or the old fashioned way? Probably on some form of rolling stock for ease of loading and discharging I would venture...

Unfortunate occurrence by any stretch of the imagination, what's the root cause though? Ballasting "mistake"? Cargo shift? Or a combination?
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  #21  
Old 31st January 2016, 07:37
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Not to mention a lack of transverse bulkheads and the resulting exposure in stability and fire containment.
That comment went right over my head the first time I read it, but in retrospect, surely it is the lack of longitudinal bulkheads that allows the cargo to shift uncontrollably. I do remember the longitudinal shifting boards elaborately installed in the holds when loading grain on a general cargo carrier, with both midship longitudinal boards and stablisising wires to help hold the same in place. Vaguely remember them being referred to as ":bundling boards", although that opens up another subject altogether.
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Old 1st February 2016, 08:47
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Good coverage on the BBC:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-35456682
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Old 1st February 2016, 10:25
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She is now getting a bit too close to shore for comfort! Hope a tug can get a connection during daylight today. I assume there is a salvage crew aboard still?
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  #24  
Old 1st February 2016, 12:33
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If she goes ashore half tide down in the weather window it might do them a favour if she sits herself upright.
Next question, which safe haven do you reckon, Brest because they are in the French zone or Bilbao because they will be travelling away from the bad weather?
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  #25  
Old 1st February 2016, 13:03
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I got a report that the Smit guys have got her under tow, AIS tracks of all associated vessels heading West at 2 plus knots seems to confirm that.
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