Car carrier aground off the Isle of Wight - merged threads - Page 11 - Ships Nostalgia
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Car carrier aground off the Isle of Wight - merged threads

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  #251  
Old 11th February 2015, 11:17
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Car carrier aground

Quote:
Originally Posted by billyboy View Post
Tied up alongside in Falmouth now. Wonder if they will dry dock her in due course.
AS FOST once said to a frigate "shoelaces are tied up, HM Ships are secured. Go out and do it again."
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  #252  
Old 11th February 2015, 11:49
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Securely moored alongside all right George?...
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  #253  
Old 11th February 2015, 13:14
breezer10 breezer10 is offline  
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http://www.falmouthphotos.com/towercam1.jpg She is filling the view at the moment on this webcam in falmouth
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  #254  
Old 11th February 2015, 13:40
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Currently in a lay-by berth awaiting dry dock space.

More info here:
http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news...irs__PICTURES/
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  #255  
Old 19th February 2015, 09:20
shippix shippix is offline  
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Visiting Falmouth yesterday, I was told this ship will be leaving her berth at
Falmouth at 11.59 hrs today Thurs 19th Feb.
She can be seen on
http://www.nmmc.co.uk/index.php?/jus...wer_out_to_sea

Peter
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  #256  
Old 19th February 2015, 11:59
shippix shippix is offline  
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Update

Have been to Hoegh Autoliners website.
They say the repairs to Hoegh Osaka should be completed today and the ship is expected to leave Falmouth tomorrow Friday 20th Feb.

Peter
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  #257  
Old 19th February 2015, 12:07
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In Falmouth on the day of her arrival.
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File Type: jpg 10959717_833655743340018_3258277245506885204_n.jpg (64.6 KB, 55 views)
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  #258  
Old 19th February 2015, 12:29
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In Falmouth on the day of her arrival.
Not as seen from the Cutty Sark steps then Dickie?
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  #259  
Old 16th March 2016, 18:09
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The MAIB report into the incident will be published tomorrow (17th).
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  #260  
Old 17th March 2016, 16:45
Mjroots Mjroots is offline  
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The report.

https://assets.digital.cabinet-offic...port6_2016.pdf
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  #261  
Old 17th March 2016, 17:53
litz litz is offline
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this is a stunning, and scary, statement :

Quote:
Witness and anecdotal evidence suggests that the practice of not calculating the
actual stability condition on completion of cargo operations but before the ship sails
extends to the PCC/PCTC sector in general. For reasons of efficiency, what is a
fundamental principle of seamanship appears to have been allowed to drift, giving
rise to potential unsafe practices.
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  #262  
Old 17th March 2016, 20:59
BOB.WHITTAKER BOB.WHITTAKER is offline  
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A news item I read today about the enquiry into the incident
stated that the findings were that no one body or person was
to blame.

What has happened to " The Buck Stops Here ". I realise
I am not party to any of the enquiries findings but it all seems
the opposite to what I accepted was in place regards the
responsibilities of the various positions onboard.

The enquiry is also reported as saying that the tank soundings
had been falsified.However without the benefit of full knowledge
of the situation it is very easy to arrive at what might be a
totaly erroneous opinion or verdict.
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  #263  
Old 17th March 2016, 21:56
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I have read the full report and the accumulative effect of estimating ballast aboard by timing pump running minutes and pump capacity would inevitably lead to a serious incident and shows appalling lack of professionalism . 24 of a crew and nobody sounding ballast tanks, unbelievable!

The annex report on page 50 states "In our opinion, a safer course of action for the crew would have been to have loaded the vessel with a lower centre of gravity in compliance with the IMO Intact Stability Code", that says it all.

The more you read the more you find, at the end of the Annex the MAIB Safety Flyer states "Hoegh Osaka’s inadequate stability had not been identified prior to departure. The figures in the pre-stowage plan were significantly different to the final cargo tally; the estimated weight of many items of cargo was less than their actual weight; and no allowance was made for the VCG of the cargo loaded being above deck level. Finally, it was onboard practice to alter the ballast tank quantity readings on the loading computer so its output would match the observed draught readings. It would have been possible to embark additional ballast prior to departure to reduce the ship’s VCG as necessary, but as the shortcoming in stability had not been identified this was not done".
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  #264  
Old 17th March 2016, 22:12
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We read plenty of complaints on SN about the 'red tape' and unreasonable requirements of Safety Management regulations, especially concerning surveys/inspections. Judging by the findings of the report and the MAIB review of the ship's documentation and practices, current surveillance and monitoring seems to be superfluous.

If a ship flouting major safety and stability requirements, whilst making frequent scheduled visits to major European/UK ports, can evade detection so readily and consistently, one can only wonder what is happening with other shipping, making random calls elsewhere.
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  #265  
Old 17th March 2016, 22:27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlbieR View Post
I have read the full report and the accumulative effect of estimating ballast aboard by timing pump running minutes and pump capacity would inevitably lead to a serious incident and shows appalling lack of professionalism . 24 of a crew and nobody sounding ballast tanks, unbelievable!

The annex report on page 50 states "In our opinion, a safer course of action for the crew would have been to have loaded the vessel with a lower centre of gravity in compliance with the IMO Intact Stability Code", that says it all.

The more you read the more you find, at the end of the Annex the MAIB Safety Flyer states "Hoegh Osakaís inadequate stability had not been identified prior to departure. The figures in the pre-stowage plan were significantly different to the final cargo tally; the estimated weight of many items of cargo was less than their actual weight; and no allowance was made for the VCG of the cargo loaded being above deck level. Finally, it was onboard practice to alter the ballast tank quantity readings on the loading computer so its output would match the observed draught readings. It would have been possible to embark additional ballast prior to departure to reduce the shipís VCG as necessary, but as the shortcoming in stability had not been identified this was not done".
Especially if he has no idea what is in the Ballast Tanks in the first place.
So called automatic Ballast System have always been a let down since they were introduced and quickly revert to handmatic usually through lack of spares.
As I have indicated the 'Root Cause' in my view was poor communication from the Master down who should have passed the e-mail to the C/O to give him time to peruse it before the vessel entered Port.
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  #266  
Old 17th March 2016, 22:49
randcmackenzie randcmackenzie is offline  
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The Canadians used to say 'Steel plate on deck and top hats in the hold'.

A sorry story all round, especially from a leading company in the vehicle trade.
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  #267  
Old 18th March 2016, 00:03
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Apart from poor, or even non existent, ballast management, the point that the local news media have picked up is the loading plan.
The ship was supposed to have arrived at Southampton partly loaded having called and loaded at other ports. Due to commercial considerations the ship called at Southampton first and nobody thought to change the loading plan. Consequently the upper decks which should have been loaded last were full and lower decks were almost empty.

Does no-one on board have any way of overriding 'the plan'?

I am just imagining the consequences of a similar 'error' on one of the large container ships with the stresses involved - frightening!
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  #268  
Old 18th March 2016, 02:29
Robert Bush Robert Bush is offline  
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Heroes and blame

The media as is their habit after maritime and aviation accidents proclaimed the Master and Pilot heroes for grounding in a safe place. The MAIB debunked that stating that the vessel with prop and ruder out of the water arrived where she was by sheer chance and if she had gone into deep water the Port would have been blocked.

At least Hoegh did not scape goat anyone but their statement that no one person was responsible rings hollow.
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  #269  
Old 18th March 2016, 09:36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Landsman View Post
Apart from poor, or even non existent, ballast management, the point that the local news media have picked up is the loading plan.
The ship was supposed to have arrived at Southampton partly loaded having called and loaded at other ports. Due to commercial considerations the ship called at Southampton first and nobody thought to change the loading plan. Consequently the upper decks which should have been loaded last were full and lower decks were almost empty.

Does no-one on board have any way of overriding 'the plan'?

I am just imagining the consequences of a similar 'error' on one of the large container ships with the stresses involved - frightening!
I'm not sure how you can load upper deck cargo followed by lower deck cargo in a container ship!
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  #270  
Old 18th March 2016, 09:39
chadburn chadburn is offline  
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Port Captain seems to rule when it comes to loading plan, I wonder if J.C. can give any indication as to where this Rank stands in the pecking order please?
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  #271  
Old 18th March 2016, 09:52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by howardws View Post
I'm not sure how you can load upper deck cargo followed by lower deck cargo in a container ship!
I was thinking end to end or even athwartship, not up and down, sorry I was not clear in putting that across.

It seems that the Head Office, computer generated, loading plan tells them to put a certain part of the load in a certain place, regardless of the fact that it was in the wrong sequence - and no one seems to have noticed until it all fell over.
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  #272  
Old 18th March 2016, 11:35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BOB.WHITTAKER View Post
A news item I read today about the enquiry into the incident
stated that the findings were that no one body or person was
to blame.

What has happened to " The Buck Stops Here ". I realise
I am not party to any of the enquiries findings but it all seems
the opposite to what I accepted was in place regards the
responsibilities of the various positions onboard.

The enquiry is also reported as saying that the tank soundings
had been falsified.However without the benefit of full knowledge
of the situation it is very easy to arrive at what might be a
totaly erroneous opinion or verdict.
Bob et al: The MAIB report clearly states that it does not apportion blame! Their investigation determines the circumstances of the incident and analyses all the contributing factors to identify causes, and makes recommendations to avoid similar incidents. It will be up to the Flag State to decide who, if anyone, was to blame.
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  #273  
Old 18th March 2016, 23:36
BOB.WHITTAKER BOB.WHITTAKER is offline  
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Regards the MAIB report and the and it's purpose being " To make
reccomendations to avoid similar incidents ". When will those be
made and implemented. I stated previously attitudes and procedures
leading up to this situation are alien to what I understood were in
place in the industry.

I appreciate that the MAIB report clearly states it does not apportion
blame, but passing this decision down the line only delays real action.
It almost dilutes the final verdict to " A slap on the wrist" .
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  #274  
Old 19th March 2016, 01:06
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BOB.WHITTAKER View Post
I appreciate that the MAIB report clearly states it does not apportion blame, but passing this decision down the line only delays real action. It almost dilutes the final verdict to " A slap on the wrist" .
The MAIB is a branch of the UK's Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA). The idea of the MAIB being restricted to establishing the details and actions leading up to marine incidents, is to make it possible for witnesses to provide evidence without feeling under threat or pressure of possible prosecution. The MAIB investigators establish the facts leading up to an incident, report them and suggest changes in training or procedures that, it is believed, will avoid future recurrences.

They do not have the power to impose their solutions on the maritime countries of the world and they do not intend to do so. By distancing themselves from legal or criminal consequences of failures of people to provide, maintain or observe safe procedures and equipment at sea, they try to preserve their independence and neutrality. They are not trying to blame or prosecute anyone, just to find out what went wrong and what could be done to prevent further, similar incidents.

It is for those responsible for operating ships and for the administrations of the various flag states to act on those findings and to implement the recommendations of the MAIB on those ships that they accept under their registration. The MCA often uses the MAIB findings to promote changes to IMO standards and recommendations. However although the MCA can change UK standards and carriage requirements, they cannot impose those on the rest of the world.
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  #275  
Old 19th March 2016, 01:33
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As we know the United States Coast Guard formulates, writes, implements and enforces American Maritime Laws. USCG will investigate an incident and is all too happy to take someone to court and prosecute.

Ask me how I know that?

On The Other Hand our National Transportation Safety Board investigates incidents alongside USCG and they publish the facts of the case including recommendations for changes.

Greg Hayden
Vista, CA USA
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