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  #226  
Old 10th October 2012, 12:11
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Stephen J. Card Stephen J. Card is offline  
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[QUOTE=John Cassels;626912]Still remember leaving Le Havre on the Asiafreighter once.
Off shore wind , Norman Angus just let her drift off the berth a bit then put
her slow ahead. You could see the acceleration.

QUOTE]


The amazing thing with gas turbines is that while the acceleration is dramatic is not as damatic as much as an instant 'STOP'!

The first was when one of the gas generators on one of the ships attempted to 'digest' a small hand torch that Captain Graham dropped down the air intake at sea. I remember seeing bent and mangled bits of turbine blading scattered on the dock in Weehawken.

The second sudden stop came from the other end. EUROLINER in Le Havre, November 1972. Preparing to sail but not quite ready. Pilot was told that if we didn't move we would be delayed by a large arriving tanker. Everyone ran to stations, let go F&A... drifted off the berth as you describe above. First movement was not Dead Slow but something considerably more..... we accelerated and as we came to the first course alteration we were moving quite fast. As the ship heeled the port prop made contact with the bottom and came to an instant stop. Coninued out to the anchorage on one engine, and then made attempt to get port negine started again. Starting not a problem but the control gear was knackered. Headed for Greenock on one engine and the ship was drydocked there for about a five days before heading to New York.

I left in Greenock on arrival and flew to Bermuda on compassionate leave. My dad had passed away while we were coming over from New York and had the ship not gone into drydock I would not have been able to get leave. In those days, being a Bermuda resident, I was not entitled to any compensation for air travel between UK and Bermuda. Probably the reason why I only took leave twice in four years! I flew home and within a few days received a letter from head office requesting my cheque for about 120 pounds for my air fare and also insstructions that I should book a ticket from Bermuda to New York to rejoin the vessel. This I did, no agent to meet at at the airport or overnight hotel... spent the night at the Port Authority Bus Terminal before heading over to Weehawken in the morning. Not much fun on cadet's pay... then about 35 pounds a month. My next leave was not until March 1974. By then I was 3/O and on filmstar wages.... could live like a king!
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  #227  
Old 10th October 2012, 14:29
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I think the circumstances of I.G Grahams torch may not have been quite like Stephen's description (wasn't it during water washing or even perhaps left inside during an HSI?) - the feedback was supposed to have been that the torch did no damage, it was all down to the batteries!

Less salt is needed for the follow up (as I heard it closer to first hand). That is that he had next appeared in the engine room to show interest in a gearbox inspection. This time, with torch firmly strapped to wrist his keys fell out of his top pocket into the gearing when bending over for a better look-see.

Agency in New York? I arrived for some urgent relief (can't remember for whom or for why). No runner at JFK (?) finally got nightwatchman at Weehawken who told me Eurofreighter had been there earlier but berth now empty. Ripped off in a taxi to Penn Street Station and then took train to Norfolk. Agent there rather miffed that I had arrived without assistance.
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  #228  
Old 10th October 2012, 15:08
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The way I was told it was that the vessel was at sea making full speed, the covers of the intakes were off as a riding crew were fitting demisters to lower salt contamination of the blades. IC and ChEng went out to have a look. Holding on to the rail, having a look , his torch fell down the shaft, there was a bang and Seatrain needed a new gas generator.

Roddy MacKenzie was mate in EUROLINER while I was there. If he is reading this I'm sure he will confirm to refute the story. I was just a cadet at the time and the vision of a captain wrecking a main engine .......

I did not sail with IC until some years later when he was master in LOCH LOMOND. Many times we spoke about the Seatrain ships but I swear, I was smart enought to not ever ask him directly about the 'incident'!
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  #229  
Old 10th October 2012, 17:59
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I am sure someone will come up with the 'goods'.

I do recall being told that the ingestion of salt had been far worse before the demisters were modified - very early on I thought.
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  #230  
Old 10th October 2012, 18:10
muldonaich muldonaich is offline  
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the real story is myself and ian ross were in the plenum chamber doing an engine wash the engine was running about 1800 reves when ic stepped through the door tripped on the hose and his torch got sucked into the engine when engine washes were done you were not allowed to have anything loose or in your pockets if my memory serves me right demisters were modified after this accident brgds kev.
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  #231  
Old 10th October 2012, 18:28
John Cassels John Cassels is offline  
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That's right Kevin , Ian Ross was the cheng at the time. A great guy.
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  #232  
Old 10th October 2012, 18:38
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Much obliged. From the horse's mouth, as it were.
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  #233  
Old 10th October 2012, 18:53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Varley View Post
I am sure someone will come up with the 'goods'.

I do recall being told that the ingestion of salt had been far worse before the demisters were modified - very early on I thought.
David
You are correct I remember when I first joined the GTV,s we carried the Pratt and Whitney brain squad who were concerned about the reduced engine life due to salt if I remember it was 30 per cent less than they thought it should have been in addition to modifying the demisters they looked at different types of turbine blades ie ceramic.
You have a good memory. I served eight happy years on these ships and enjoyed every minute of it even with Big Bertha and BFO
Tom
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  #234  
Old 10th October 2012, 19:21
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That's right Kevin , Ian Ross was the cheng at the time. A great guy.
John
Whatever happened to Peter Yates long time third mate on the GTV,s?
Tom
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  #235  
Old 10th October 2012, 19:23
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What a laugh with the torch and THEN the keys! I look at GT losses all the time.

Two favourites: one concerns a step ladder, the other a lump hammer.......Yes, you guessed it, left in the intake on start up! With regard to the first, my bosses immortal words were,"Well, you have a covered loss - But we aren't paying you for the bloody ladder!".

Rgds.
Dave
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  #236  
Old 10th October 2012, 21:47
muldonaich muldonaich is offline  
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Quote:
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That's right Kevin , Ian Ross was the cheng at the time. A great guy.
hi john ianross was jun chief at the time the first two jun chiefs were himself and allan blackwood two gentlemen and to of the best engineers i ever sailed with if you looked down from inside the demisters there was a lot of baffle plates so the air did not go down and hit the bottom of the plenum chamber in a lump that was done before they left the yard the demisters were washed every morning we had a wee machine that told you how many particles of salt was in the water you washed out we had to record that great ships to sail on great crowds from the old men down kev.
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  #237  
Old 11th October 2012, 09:00
John Cassels John Cassels is offline  
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John
Whatever happened to Peter Yates long time third mate on the GTV,s?
Tom
Morning Tom, yes remember Peter Yates. Think it was on the
Asialiner or Euroliner. But no idea what happened to him.
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  #238  
Old 11th October 2012, 09:05
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Another thing sticks in my mind about the GTV's is that when coasting , one
very rarely had a "risk of collision situation ", we were simply going too fast
for other traffic to present a problem.
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  #239  
Old 11th October 2012, 09:25
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Kevin, Thanks.

A bit like the story about BR testing the windows on the front end of a chain by firing chickens at them through a special canon. The Americans decided to used the same method when testing their windows. The windows constantly failed in testing so they went back to BR to discover what was wrong. The reeply came back.... "Defrost the chickens."
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  #240  
Old 11th October 2012, 09:34
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Another thing sticks in my mind about the GTV's is that when coasting , one
very rarely had a "risk of collision situation ", we were simply going too fast
for other traffic to present a problem.


Southbound NY to Baltimore....

EUROLINER southbound making about 25 knots. Two or three miles away on our starboard beam making same speed northbound... another gtv..... in the middle between us doing about 10 knots...the GINA MARIA. Would have made a great photo!
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  #241  
Old 11th October 2012, 09:43
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Quote:
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John
Whatever happened to Peter Yates long time third mate on the GTV,s?
Tom


I remember a lad up at GCNS when I was there doing Second Mates. I think it was Peter Yates but I am not 100% certain. The chap I knew would have been in his late 20s or early 30s (in 1974). Taller than average and walked with a slight limp. While in college he flipped his little 3 wheel car and spent a few weeks in hispital. Some months later he went off to one of the Scanscot ships, fell down the hold off a ladder and was killed. I'm not 100% certain it was Peter Yates. I think mention of this was made in Denholm New sat the time.

Stephen
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  #242  
Old 11th October 2012, 12:09
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen J. Card View Post
Kevin, Thanks.

A bit like the story about BR testing the windows on the front end of a chain by firing chickens at them through a special canon. The Americans decided to used the same method when testing their windows. The windows constantly failed in testing so they went back to BR to discover what was wrong. The reeply came back.... "Defrost the chickens."
The late Ryan O'Hare had two 'tall tales' told over some of the beers we enjoyed together:

1) He and Jimmy Holden boarded a plane having both remarked on the punishment a GG could take as evinced by two distorted compressor blades they had both noticed.

Plane took off only to make emergency landing with said engine vibrating fit to bust. On telling the pilot of the damage they had noticed they became "bloody fools" for having said nothing earlier. It was assumed that the damage was done as the engine was being shut down after the last landing.

2) at TPMS he witnessed the chicken test done with a frozen bird. The result was as the apocryphal story had it, GG all same bird - gutted.

(You must admit the temptation for all involved to know for sure what would happen must be great - it must have happend some time or even some times).
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  #243  
Old 11th October 2012, 17:52
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Found this the crew list fom the Eurofreighter,s first voyage on BFO you might remember some of the names
Tom Sutherland Master. Alan Paterson c/o Charles Black 2/o Chris Walmsley 3/o Ed Collins ECO Gary Roberts 2nd RO Willie Purnell ch/Eng. Colin Booth 2nd Eng Gerry Morrison 3rd Eng Dave Wood 3rd Eng Robert Johnston Deck Cadet Jeremy Meek Eng Cadet Angus McAskill CPO Finlay Maclean PO Malcolm Macaulay GP1 Gerry Wardl GP1 Murdo Mackenzie GP1 Murdo Morrison GP1 John Macleod GP1 Michael Kelly GP1 Alex Cameron GP1 John Costa Cat Off Frank Love Cook Bob Bryce Stwd Mat Cherri Stwd John Glencross cat boy Campbell Millet cat boy Dave Anderson Seatrain Engineer.
It was a voyage to remember engine room fire and we lost both engines
TomS
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  #244  
Old 11th October 2012, 18:20
John Cassels John Cassels is offline  
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When was this Tom?. I left the GTV's before the advent of BFO but many of
the names ring bells.
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  #245  
Old 11th October 2012, 18:26
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Quote:
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When was this Tom?. I left the GTV's before the advent of BFO but many of
the names ring bells.
John
It was August 1976 we even managed to damage the new prop hen we came out of dry dock in Falmouth
Tom
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  #246  
Old 11th October 2012, 21:46
Harry Grainger Harry Grainger is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Varley View Post
The late Ryan O'Hare had two 'tall tales' told over some of the beers we enjoyed together:

1) He and Jimmy Holden boarded a plane having both remarked on the punishment a GG could take as evinced by two distorted compressor blades they had both noticed.

Plane took off only to make emergency landing with said engine vibrating fit to bust. On telling the pilot of the damage they had noticed they became "bloody fools" for having said nothing earlier. It was assumed that the damage was done as the engine was being shut down after the last landing.

2) at TPMS he witnessed the chicken test done with a frozen bird. The result was as the apocryphal story had it, GG all same bird - gutted.

(You must admit the temptation for all involved to know for sure what would happen must be great - it must have happend some time or even some times).
Another page without an Engineer from the days of the GTV's saying anything, someday I will try to correct some of the rubbish, but please along with Ryan O'Hare was James G Holburn ( not Jimmy Holden ). James G was among other things in Denholm's, in charge of cadets when I was interviewed and offered an "Indentured Apprenticeship" by him in 1965. Google the man and it tells you his input to Marine Engineering ! !
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  #247  
Old 11th October 2012, 22:03
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen J. Card View Post
Southbound NY to Baltimore....

EUROLINER southbound making about 25 knots. Two or three miles away on our starboard beam making same speed northbound... another gtv..... in the middle between us doing about 10 knots...the GINA MARIA. Would have made a great photo!
Bloody hell - Gina Maria making 10 knots - that must have been a good day. I spent a great deal of time on that dear old girl going round in circles due to excessively worn teeth on the steering quadrant.
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  #248  
Old 11th October 2012, 22:40
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Bloody hell - Gina Maria making 10 knots - that must have been a good day. I spent a great deal of time on that dear old girl going round in circles due to excessively worn teeth on the steering quadrant.


Ray,

Were you on the GM when she grounded off Belieze?

Neil B Morrison was 2nd Mate.

Stephen
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  #249  
Old 12th October 2012, 00:17
mullethunt mullethunt is offline  
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I recall these ships having bow thrusters. Often when coming into Charleston one main or thruster or one main and thruster were not operational thus requiring escort to navigate the many turns to berth.
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  #250  
Old 12th October 2012, 04:46
Bill61402 Bill61402 is offline
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Surprised by how large the props are. Read they are 7.15m lips props. That seems very large for cp props of that era. Not an expert but seems large.
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