Rough weather for the cook - Ships Nostalgia
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Rough weather for the cook

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  #1  
Old 12th February 2016, 22:48
Sandbar Sandbar is offline  
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Rough weather for the cook

Just saw the video of rough weather:
http://gcaptain.com/watch-emergency-...torm-gertrude/

This from the gcaptain.com website.

As a former cook on a small 600 ton vessel, we never see a video of the poor bloody cook hanging on and still trying to put together a feed for the crew. We all have stories of bad weather but has anyone tried to video the galley when we try to bash out a good feed for the crew that are well enough to eat?
I used to tell them that as as my feet started to leave the deck as the ship pitched off a wave, you get frozen pies and pasties heated up or make your own sandwich.
It was like trying to stand and work on a roller coaster that is cork screwing.
All accommodation is forward. I could never work out why they put my rough triangle shape galley up forward (behind the anchor chain bulkhead) and yet the better spot would be where the heads (toilets) are to give a bit better ride. The heads are 10 metres aft of the galley and about the same size in area.
Sometimes they should make the marine architect take the ride in bad weather.
That my whinge for the day!

Regards to all, from Sandbar
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  #2  
Old 14th February 2016, 09:03
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Aye yer right there Sandbag. On some ships it's a if the galleys been thrown in as an afterthought.
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  #3  
Old 14th February 2016, 14:44
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I would like to 'touch my forelock' here and pay tribute to the cook on each of the tugs I served on. South Africa then had the strange idea of the harbour tugs also being salvage tugs. We carried three days 'emergency' supplies and I remember particularly being sent out in foul weather for a tanker that had lost its propeller off Mossel Bay. It took us five days to get her but we always had something hot. He was definitely more important than i. I was only the driver!
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  #4  
Old 15th February 2016, 12:10
john blythe john blythe is offline  
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I worked a few coaster's in my time. They were like roller coasters, out in the North sea in winter. But at the end of the day they had to have a hot meal. You can not get away with salad in February.
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  #5  
Old 15th February 2016, 12:50
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I watched the Cruel Sea the other day. My dad served on a Flower class Corvette and says the conditions below were very well done in the film including the galley with hot meals often spilling over the galley sole. He also remembers taking slops up from the galley to put over the side on a V&W class destroyer mid Atlantic which was equally hazardous.

Your suggestion of moving the galley aft is absolutely correct but moving the heads forward might give problems only solvable by engineers from the International Space Station. Heads port, galley Starboard?
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  #6  
Old 15th February 2016, 21:57
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I also worked on a Pacific class patrol boat, specifically built to take the police forces from the pacific islands (New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, etc) so these forces could police the fishing zone around their territory.
The galley was down below about midships where you had a reasonable ride but all stores had to be man handled from the dock to down below to the galley which had a large opening with a bain-marie to the cress mess and of course all gash rubbish had to be taken out to the main deck aft.
A small fridge in the galley, with the freezer right aft in the engine room.
The funny thing is that accomodation for 6 persons was on the main deck near the stern with tons of room, which was nearly the full width of the boat.
Why it wasn't this space the galley, with built in fridges & freezers handy & mess room for crew had me beat until I asked why.
The reason was that it was built from Navy plans and that is how it was.
I questioned that if the company knew what the boat was wanted for, why don't they ask someone with experience (and common sense) in different working areas for input before construction began.
I was stunned when the general manager agreed with me and the policy will be implemented in future.

Sandbar
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  #7  
Old 4th December 2018, 12:36
morky1 morky1 is offline  
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I doubt there has ever been a galley designed by someone who had to work in it, except the Endeavour (replica) designed and built in Fremantle WA
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  #8  
Old 4th December 2018, 13:47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john blythe View Post
I worked a few coaster's in my time. They were like roller coasters, out in the North sea in winter. But at the end of the day they had to have a hot meal. You can not get away with salad in February.
I sailed on trawlers, coasters and deep sea, I take my hat off to the cooks, stewards and peggies who delivered hot meals to various parts of the vessel in all kinds of atrocious weather from North Sea blow-hards to Atlantic hurricanes and Pacific typhoons. Having been at sea during shore rationing period, the food regardless of how it was cooked was an eye opener, Sunday dinner every day and Christmas dinner once a week .memories
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  #9  
Old 2nd March 2019, 23:58
George Bis George Bis is offline
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I suppose we did take the cooks & stewards for granted. In the time I was at sea the only time I didn't get a cooked meal was when in a mad gale the bridge was cut off. No tunnel and you would have been washed overboard.
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  #10  
Old 3rd March 2019, 05:53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by George Bis View Post
I suppose we did take the cooks & stewards for granted. In the time I was at sea the only time I didn't get a cooked meal was when in a mad gale the bridge was cut off. No tunnel and you would have been washed overboard.
Just wondering if there were canned foods in the forward superstructure for times like that? Biscuits at least?
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  #11  
Old 3rd March 2019, 22:21
George Bis George Bis is offline
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Actually on that ship, the "Sugar Importer" we had a pantry, usually used during for a fry-up during night cargo watches and to perhaps make toast after a night watch.

On this occasion (16/1/1974 hurricane force winds at the entrence of the English Channel) we had the Captain, three Mates, Bosun and three AB's
"living" in the centre castle for about 12 hours and the pantry was used to the full. We soon established a cooking routine.
The Cadets cabin was not in use and Bosun and AB's used this. It really was a case of "all muck in and get it done"

The following day the storm vanished and we steamed up the Channel in almost Spring like weather!
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  #12  
Old 18th March 2019, 17:43
para handy clyde para handy clyde is offline  
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I remember being on the coaster ST AIDEN.I was Galley boy.
We were sailing past Cape Wrath in a storm.How the cook managed is beyond me.I did 3 months on her but could not get used to the way she rolled.I gave up rock jumping and went deep sea.
Hats off to all the coaster men who are still bobbing about out there.
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  #13  
Old 19th March 2019, 11:31
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Hats off to all cooks who work in bad weather! Slightly off topic but we were on passage in the Indian Ocean and rolling like hell! Our table in the saloon was athwartships butted up to the galley bulhead. Three cadets, the 3/O ans Sparlie occupied the table. Fiddly had been raised, baize watered down etc. Soup passed without event then the roast beef arrived along with the spuds, veg and gravy. We were all getting tucked in when she took an almighty roll and everyone grabbed their plates, bad move, all the grub shot onto the table in one large mess! You never saw forks dive in like it to try and salavage our dinner as the ship I was on had a notorious nutter of a catain who was a bad feeder and we all knew what was on the table was all there was going to be until breakfast!
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  #14  
Old 19th March 2019, 12:30
tom roberts tom roberts is offline  
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On the Novelist a Harrison ship 1954 the galley was midships and as Peggy I had to take the meals aft, the weather was foul all the way from the Mexican gulf to Liverpool the Irish Sea was the worst those who were around then December 1954 will know what it was like,well the cook was a bloody hero producing hot meals,but one day I was taking the food aft in tin dixies when a wave took me of my feet and I lost the lot,sympathy from the crew ? No bloody chance a belt around the head and get my **** back to the cook for more no chance I was terrified to go back aft for another smack around the head ,ungrateful bastards.I have posted before about a coasting cook who went ashore with our victualling money who came back pissed out of his head with a bunch of carrot and nowt else,did anyone out there have a similar experience?.
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  #15  
Old 29th March 2019, 22:36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom roberts View Post
On the Novelist a Harrison ship 1954 the galley was midships and as Peggy I had to take the meals aft, the weather was foul all the way from the Mexican gulf to Liverpool the Irish Sea was the worst those who were around then December 1954 will know what it was like,well the cook was a bloody hero producing hot meals,but one day I was taking the food aft in tin dixies when a wave took me of my feet and I lost the lot,sympathy from the crew ? No bloody chance a belt around the head and get my **** back to the cook for more no chance I was terrified to go back aft for another smack around the head ,ungrateful bastards.I have posted before about a coasting cook who went ashore with our victualling money who came back pissed out of his head with a bunch of carrot and nowt else,did anyone out there have a similar experience?.
Tom, your post took me back to 1956 and experiences on a collier out of the Tyne. At Battersea the cook would send the boy ashore for sliced loaves, and fish and chips for our dinners. I wonder what his budget was?
Later in Brocklebanks we were fed handsomely - the company wished to keep its men. I'm trying to recall what the steward's budget was per head. I've a vague idea it was less than five bob a day/per man in 1957. I don't know how they managed to feed us so well on that budget.
Anyone familiar with those budgets?
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  #16  
Old 29th March 2019, 22:38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom roberts View Post
On the Novelist a Harrison ship 1954 the galley was midships and as Peggy I had to take the meals aft, the weather was foul all the way from the Mexican gulf to Liverpool the Irish Sea was the worst those who were around then December 1954 will know what it was like,well the cook was a bloody hero producing hot meals,but one day I was taking the food aft in tin dixies when a wave took me of my feet and I lost the lot,sympathy from the crew ? No bloody chance a belt around the head and get my **** back to the cook for more no chance I was terrified to go back aft for another smack around the head ,ungrateful bastards.I have posted before about a coasting cook who went ashore with our victualling money who came back pissed out of his head with a bunch of carrot and nowt else,did anyone out there have a similar experience?.
Tom, your post took me back to 1956 and experiences on a collier out of the Tyne. At Battersea the cook would send the boy ashore for sliced loaves, and fish and chips for our dinners. I wonder what his budget was?
Later in Brocklebanks we were fed handsomely - the company wished to keep its men. I'm trying to recall what the steward's budget was per head. I've a vague idea it was less than five bob a day/per man in 1957. I don't know how they managed to feed us so well on that figure.
Anyone familiar with those catering costs?
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  #17  
Old 30th March 2019, 01:05
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A Lad's Initiation - SS Sheaf Arrow 1950

I have posted this before - #116 Tusitala Tales 6/3/18. However, I repost it for our many new members since that time, some of whom are sure to have proudly worn the rating of Peggy... just kidding!
'Twas a dark and stormy night and the captain said to the mate... hang on, that's another story! It was dark and stormy though and I was bravely stepping out of the Galley firmly clutching the dixies containing the sailors' dinners, very, very firmly with both hands. The mantra, 'one hand for yourself and one for the ship', was furthest from my mind as my rapport in the sailors' mess, wasn't all beer and skittles.
'Never turn your back on the ocean', was another among so many things to remember - I'd forgotten that one too, so my legs were swept out from under me as I took a step aft and to sanctuary - of a sort! I never saw the dixies again!!

Big Fred Crowe from Tiger Bay, saved my life that fateful day: ( sounds like a line from a poem, eh?)

A YOUNG LAD'S INITIATION TO LIFE AT SEA!

MY FIRST TRIP - AS PEGGY!!

I had nothing to do for an hour or two,
so I thought I'd compose a short poem.

I would write of the sailors who taught me so well
and about the big debt that I owe 'em:

I first went to sea in a rusty old tramp,
full of thoughts and big dreams of adventure.

Signed on at the Pool by Bill Henke, the scamp
and away to my ship I did venture.

Many films had I seen of sailors so tough
on the screen, in my recent schooldays.

But I wasn't prepared - they were so bloody rough,
would I see any more my birthdays?

Soon we sailed away to the far shores of France -
it was far for me as a lad!

The excitement of landing made me piss my new pants,
if he knew, my dad would be mad!

Back at sea I worked hard and although I was sick,
they made me work harder and harder.

"Move it Peg!" they would say - Hell I can't take a trick,
it just made me get madder and madder.

Rough weather we struck in the Biscay Bay,
with sixty-foot waves high above us.

Just two thousand tons, we hardly made way
and we wondered, "Does God really love us?"

On deck, I was hit by a bloody great wave
and into the scuppers did go.

From the dark came a hand and this lad did it save...
'twas Jamaican AB - big Fred Crowe!

"It's OK me lad - grab my big black arce!"
and I flung my arms tight round his waist.

I owed my young life to big brave Fred
as he fought hard to safety in haste.

We just made it home - with a deep starboard list,
and the skipper yelled: "TO YOUR GODS PRAY!!"

We did, and ashore we all went to get pissed
and give thanks for that GLORIOUS DAY!

I signed three more times on that brave little ship,
and the sailors, they taught me so much.

Respect for the sea and the mates that you made,
in a life that most men wouldn't touch.

But the best part of all was it gave me some marrow,
as I grew from a boy to a man.

I learned to be tough and to face up to fear
and from terror, I no longer ran.

I will never forget the little "SHEAF ARROW"
as she fought through that raging great storm,

And the captain so strong, who stayed days awake,
to ensure we arrived safely home.

Taff
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  #18  
Old 1st May 2019, 19:22
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Always had great admiration for the Cook on the Marchon Trader in early 1964. I remember seeing about 4 or 5 large pans wedged on the galley stove with a small amount of soup in each one, so it didn't spill over. Also the Steward when serving, recommended I kept a firm hold of the soup dish and make sure it didn't come over the edge as it was very hot !!

David
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Old 1st May 2019, 21:24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tsell View Post
I have posted this before - #116 Tusitala Tales 6/3/18. However, I repost it for our many new members since that time, some of whom are sure to have proudly worn the rating of Peggy... just kidding!
'Twas a dark and stormy night and the captain said to the mate... hang on, that's another story! It was dark and stormy though and I was bravely stepping out of the Galley firmly clutching the dixies containing the sailors' dinners, very, very firmly with both hands. The mantra, 'one hand for yourself and one for the ship', was furthest from my mind as my rapport in the sailors' mess, wasn't all beer and skittles.
'Never turn your back on the ocean', was another among so many things to remember - I'd forgotten that one too, so my legs were swept out from under me as I took a step aft and to sanctuary - of a sort! I never saw the dixies again!!

Big Fred Crowe from Tiger Bay, saved my life that fateful day: ( sounds like a line from a poem, eh?)

A YOUNG LAD'S INITIATION TO LIFE AT SEA!

MY FIRST TRIP - AS PEGGY!!

I had nothing to do for an hour or two,
so I thought I'd compose a short poem.

I would write of the sailors who taught me so well
and about the big debt that I owe 'em:

I first went to sea in a rusty old tramp,
full of thoughts and big dreams of adventure.

Signed on at the Pool by Bill Henke, the scamp
and away to my ship I did venture.

Many films had I seen of sailors so tough
on the screen, in my recent schooldays.

But I wasn't prepared - they were so bloody rough,
would I see any more my birthdays?

Soon we sailed away to the far shores of France -
it was far for me as a lad!

The excitement of landing made me piss my new pants,
if he knew, my dad would be mad!

Back at sea I worked hard and although I was sick,
they made me work harder and harder.

"Move it Peg!" they would say - Hell I can't take a trick,
it just made me get madder and madder.

Rough weather we struck in the Biscay Bay,
with sixty-foot waves high above us.

Just two thousand tons, we hardly made way
and we wondered, "Does God really love us?"

On deck, I was hit by a bloody great wave
and into the scuppers did go.

From the dark came a hand and this lad did it save...
'twas Jamaican AB - big Fred Crowe!

"It's OK me lad - grab my big black arce!"
and I flung my arms tight round his waist.

I owed my young life to big brave Fred
as he fought hard to safety in haste.

We just made it home - with a deep starboard list,
and the skipper yelled: "TO YOUR GODS PRAY!!"

We did, and ashore we all went to get pissed
and give thanks for that GLORIOUS DAY!

I signed three more times on that brave little ship,
and the sailors, they taught me so much.

Respect for the sea and the mates that you made,
in a life that most men wouldn't touch.

But the best part of all was it gave me some marrow,
as I grew from a boy to a man.

I learned to be tough and to face up to fear
and from terror, I no longer ran.

I will never forget the little "SHEAF ARROW"
as she fought through that raging great storm,

And the captain so strong, who stayed days awake,
to ensure we arrived safely home.

Taff
Good to hear your prose again Taff
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  #20  
Old 1st May 2019, 22:53
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That needs a tune putting to it.

"Sheaf Arrow" could be a song for down the ages.
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  #21  
Old 2nd May 2019, 20:59
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Quote:
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That needs a tune putting to it.

"Sheaf Arrow" could be a song for down the ages.
You are right Farmer but while a storm at sea demands the blare of brass , the thunderous roll of drums and the strident crash of symbols I feel that the ship's name invokes a more pastroral theme to my mind.
The Sheaf could be the gatherings of crops of wheat, corn , or even tropical sugar cane carefully woven to form a warm love nest beneath the twinkling stars , the Damsel, a sylphe like figure clad only in the figment of one's imagination and the Arrow could be plucked from Cupids hand upon his bow or from a lover's trousers .
We should not mention that serpent from The Garden of Eden.
Beyond this theme my words are deadened by a early dawn down under and perhaps Barrie might bring the sweet lyrics to enliven the scene

Bob
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  #22  
Old 2nd May 2019, 22:53
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Although built in 1964, the bridge and navigating officers' accommodation of the 63,000 dwt tanker ss "Regent Pembroke" was amid-ships. The saloon and galley and the rest of the ship's complement were located in the aft accommodation. So for the mates and me (the R/O) all meals necessitated a trip aft, across the main deck (there was no 'flying bridge' provided) which was only protected from the sea by rails, not bulwarks. Not a lot of protection against breaking waves in heavy weather when we were fully loaded running around the Cape of Good Hope from the Gulf to Trinidad.

The designers (and the owners) had thoughtfully provided an alternative route to be used in such situations - a tunnel below the deck, running along the port side between the aft accommodation block and the centre-castle. This was accessed via vertical metal ladders at each end and was shared with various pipelines, steamlines, cable-runs and the like. It was hot, filthy and not at all "friendly" to uniforms, especially whites.
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  #23  
Old 3rd May 2019, 12:24
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The Shell Bitumen carrier 'Partula' was midships for the Mates and me - R/O. After leaving Curacao for Dublin, we encountered a hurricane - or a bit of it - and were running just ahead it it. The Capt told his steward to collect as much food and sandwiches as he could muster for two or three days, and banned us absolutely from going aft for meals. His Steward enjoyed the owners suite for a few days. The main deck was awash for most of the time, and when we arrived in Dublin, All the Shell Super could say was 'the decks are looking a bit rusty Mr Mate' !!!

David
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  #24  
Old 5th May 2019, 06:59
ALBY2 ALBY2 is offline  
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From the Gordon Lightfoot song “The wreck of the Edmund Fitzegerald” are the lines:

When suppertime came, the old cook came on deck
Saying, "Fellas, it's too rough to feed ya."
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