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  #51  
Old 27th February 2012, 14:41
Steve G Steve G is offline  
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Floppy hat

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Hi
Can remember him just, I can picture him in my head always had a floppy cap?
stuart
The hat was turned down at the sides rather than being floppy. I think he had secret ambitions to be a U boat commander. I have a picture of the class of 72 on my 'gallery'
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  #52  
Old 27th February 2012, 22:20
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I think several wanted to be u-boat commanders
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  #53  
Old 7th March 2012, 14:31
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Plymouth

I was at Plymouth 1977-1980 as a Deck Cadet. We had the 'cabin' right at the end overlooking the city and the Sound. On Phase 1 I shared with two blokes from Reardon Smith. Room next door full of Engineers who bought one record at a time and played it incessantly to an inch of its life, then they bought another and so it went on... Cant listen to Mr Blue Sky without thinking of it
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  #54  
Old 7th March 2012, 17:33
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Good times!
On Phase 1 there were 7 of us in a room (cabin) .. us BP Cadets had to have to top bunks and we had 3 Engineer Cadets from New Zealand Shipping in with us on the bottom bunks; and a Shell Engineer Cadet as our room 'Captain'

Ironique!
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  #55  
Old 7th March 2012, 17:59
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I was at Portland Place pre-sea sept 72, phase 1 ONC Sept 73 to Feb 74 and Merrifield phase 3 April to Dec 75
Was with RFA, Bliss, Jones, Carter, Evans , Thomas (RIP) and others from BP, P&O, Irish Shipping and Shell. Summer 75 best time of my life. Goodies every evening, beach or park then Wellington every sat & sun.
Lecturers Gibson, Crookall, Hill, Tozer.
Played football in winter close to Argyles ground, had 500 watching us in first half and nobody in second half
Sat the rest at Warsash,
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  #56  
Old 8th March 2012, 09:36
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Always remember the RFA cadets were top notch with their semaphore & morse code as they used them all the time at sea! I think there were 3 guys with RFA when I was there, half a dozen from BP and the rest a general mix, mainly cargo guys.

The only lecturers name there that rings a bell is Tozer (Chiefy)! Had a guy called Lester for GSK ... Mitchell for Navigation & Seamanship - theory & practical down at Cattedown Boat Centre.
Must have been there at much of the same time .. did my EDH & Lifeboat in January 74 .. Radar Observer down at Fishers Nose in Nov 73, Fire fighting at Camels Head fire station in Nov 73
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  #57  
Old 8th March 2012, 22:35
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HMS Caprice

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I was one of a group who were invited to join an RN ship for a day at Plymouth. We boarded this vessel, an oldish destroyer I think and I believe the last of her type, down at Devonport one morning and sailed out into the Channel, where we spent the next few hours policing an exclusion zone around what I believe was a small coaster. Apparently she'd arrived in port with a cargo of (or including) explosives, which were weaping and had been deemed unstable. Anyway, at dusk there was quite a vivid flash on the horizon as that little ship was blown asunder, followed a few seconds later by the shock wave. A few bits of timber marked the spot where she'd been, and then it was full speed back to port. Boy, did she motor! I seem to remember standing on the stern looking up at the standing wave from her props, illuminated by the deck lights. She was steam turbine powered, and had a pressurised boiler-room to provide combustion air, accessed by air locks, but her name escapes me, and I don't think that I was ever aware of the name of the coaster.
As an aside, does the name 'Bridget' ring any bells?
Regards, Mike
HMS Caprice was still active in the spring of '73. She did a patrol in the Cod War, I think she was there towards the end of Feb. I was on RFA Wave Chief and RASed with her on more than one occasion. She had a terrific turn of speed as well. After searching for a week for a life raft from an Icelandic trawler that had gone down, news came through that it had been sighted. Caprice must have lit up more fires as black smoke poured out of her funnels and she accelerated away from us. She looked very impressive, just like in the old war movies.

John
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  #58  
Old 7th May 2012, 18:25
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Hi all,
I was a deck cadet with BP at Plymouth for induction, ph 1 and Ph3 of OND, starting summer 1972.
Not, I am afraid, happy memories for me mostly. I was the only woman in the residences and somewhat socially isolated as my own classmates gave me an unrelentingly hard time. I generally socialised with the ONC classes who were better.

I dont recall many names, but someone else on page 1 of this thread mentioned John Ash, a Shell e/c very blond, and I recall him as I went out with him briefly, as also Steve Nolan, also Shell e/c very yorkshire. On the deck side I recall Tony Bateman, one of a load of the welsh cadets, a big guy, very affable. He was CCC in our second term of Ph1 and I was an SEC. Also another nice guy, the only one in my class, was Tim Leighton, a d/c from Bibby's. Tony became a policeman I think.

I really struggled with signals, especially the semaphore - we were the last lot to do it. I had to go to all the evening and saturday classes that Chiefy Tozer put on, just to scrape a pass on signals. Everything else was ok and I seem to recall a rotund Czech lecturer whose idea of teaching navigation was to dictate from the book.

Tectona: OMG! The trip we did was AWFUL - most of us seasick. We managed to totally lose 3 massive dayglo orange buoys in an effort to learn man overboard drill before the instructor felt this was becoming too expensive to continue. I always avoided sailing when it was in dinghies as I never much liked it but loved the rowing in whalers and lifeboats as I had done loads before I joined.

As both Ph1 and Ph3 were during the winters I also recall ghastly games afternoons in the driving rain, doing crosscountry running while the boys did rugby or something.

Nitelife: Goodies - tick - I can scarcely recall going anywhere else. What was the name of that massive barn of a place with no furniture, kitted out like a wildwest saloon, at the far end of Union street? It was wildwest by nature too, very nasty. Also for upscale nasty: The Groin Exchange down on the Hoe?

nina
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  #59  
Old 7th May 2012, 18:40
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The Groin Exchange - - wasn't that Plymouth Sailing Club?
3rd mate Dave Thomas from Hooe, just outside Plymouth, was doing his mates whilst I was doing my Phase 3 - he had a yellow Cortina mark 3 and used to collect me from College and take me there!!
Stayed at Standard House for phase 3 - many stayed at Merriefield Hall because it was next door to the nurses home in Greenbank Road - but I used to get off home every weekend and Standard House was right next to Plymouth railway station ... & Mr 'pop' Howard who was the warden there used to let me off each week.
Shared a room with Geoff Meadway (BP), he had a 3 wheeled Messerschmidt car and was from Kent I think!
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  #60  
Old 7th May 2012, 18:59
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Mr Cornish popped back into my life here in Glasgow as he was head of the Glasgow Nautical College and used to come to meetings at the department of naval architecture where I used to work at the university. He has now retired I think.
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  #61  
Old 7th May 2012, 20:42
PaulFuller PaulFuller is offline  
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Smile Happy days

Came across the site by chance. Have just read through the thread - brings back many (mainly good) memories of life as a Shell cadet in the RNC (induction course 1972), Phase 1 1973 with Bill Currie and Phase 3 in 1975 in Standard House with Pop Howard).

Nina, I certainly remember your name and sorry that your memories are not all good.

I certainly remember the dancing classes on Phase 3 or was it Phase 1 with the girls from Sherwood School - great fun.

Spent most of free time in Goodies until Ron (landlord) moved to Three Crowns. Scottie Dunn, Alan Jones, Peter Sim, Dave Isaacs et al.

Mid-week we used to go to Halfway House and Sundays was either Plume of Feathers or over to the Ship at Noss Mayo.

Tectona was a nightmare went to France and I was sick as a dog until made cook which seemed to cure it probably because it was non stop and you didn't have to time to be sea sick.

Remember being late for signals with Chiefy Tozer having I think just taken driving test - he went ballistic and I spent Saturday morning cutting grass outside RNC with a pair of scissors.

Recently went back to Plymouth on business, met up with Tim Charlesworth (HM Cattewater) and we went to Jamie for a couple - wouldn't have recognised it. Who remembers cashing a cheque for a couple of quid in exchange for a pint? Had a few pints in there by candlelight during the miners strike.
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  #62  
Old 7th May 2012, 22:35
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Plume of Feathers was a regular on Wednesday eve and Sunday lunchtimes .... Pheasant Pluckers played out there on Wednesdays and Porrij on Sundays.

Used to use the Penny Come Quick pub down past the railway station on the other side, passing through the Jamie to cash a cheque on the way. Goodies was a Sunday night visit, usually with Steve Lyons (deceased), who was another BP cadet from Paignton, often gave me a lift back in his MG Midget.

Never got to cut the grass with scissors, though regular marching drill on a Saturday morning followed by litter picking as a punishment was a Chiefy special.
Bloody flag break every morning on the teaching block roof - followed by a hair length check!!

Radar courses down at Fishers Nose, now a cafe for visitors I believe.

There was a big mixture of cadets at Plymouth when I was there, plenty of Shell lads - BP also used to send their Sparkies to Plymouth Uni next door for various courses.
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  #63  
Old 25th May 2012, 21:10
Martyn Hammond Martyn Hammond is offline  
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Peggys'

Was there for MCRC 69 at Murryfield and Stanford Houses (I think those are the spellings)
One of the things that stands out in my mind is making supper and slicing the bread as thin as possible with the meat slicer and keeping the bulk of the loaf for ourselves.
Getting jumped on by the other cadets as the bread was brought out on a tray
Hilarious
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  #64  
Old 1st July 2012, 23:46
Andy Biegala Andy Biegala is offline  
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Hi All

I am Andrew Biegala and I had the good fortune to be taken on as a deck cadet by Silver Line in 1977. I did a two week induction course in August 1977. Then came back to Portland Square from April to December 1978 and finally to Standard House from September 1979 to April 1980.

I remember these times with great affection. Not everything was fun at the time of course but looking back on it I would not change one thing, one class mate or one day.

I remember the legendary Cheify Tozier, my own class tutor Stafford-Pozier and in particular Captain Wormald, Ex shell Captain who told the best sea stories that will ever be told and inspired me to carry on at times when I felt it was getting too hard.

I did my stint on the Tectona. My class was split into two groups. The first half of the alphabet was made up largely of the rogues and characters of the class and we gave the standing crew of the Tectona a hard time. During our week we used up all the water, ate all the food and ran down the battery. Only the wind was left!

The second part of the class followed us (after doing the Dartmoor thing) and they were well behaved and disciplined. Unfortunatley, their bus arrived late and they were late reporting to Tectona and the crew decided they had an even worse group than us and decided to discipline them on the spot, hence a large part of their first day was spent cleaning the slip way of the seamanship centre!

I remember the generally good food in generous portions and the wonderful way we were looked after by the dinner ladies ("All right my lover").

The discipline could be a bit arbitary. I remember a particular incident with one of my class mates. The lifts could hold ten people. One day he got into the lift at the top and during its decent through the ten floors of Portland Square more and more cadets got aboard until there were eleven and he was at the back.

When it got to the ground floor the bearded scottish guy that ran the foyer at the time counted out the cadets and he was the eleventh guy out despite being the first one aboard and was blamed for the overloading and disciplined. Whenever I think of this incident I burst out in tears of laughter.

The standard of tuition was extrodinary. I was a dumb home counties kid (still am really!) and how they got me through the many exams and courses I will never really know but my theory is that as most of the tutors there were ex seafarers, frequently brought ashore for reasons of injury, retirement etc. They were seafarers first and teachers second, but the first profession gave them the command and the credibility plus the love of the subject (and us) to really impose learning upon us.

I will never get such a good education ever again or anywhere else and am fortunate to have passed through it's doors.

I hope these few words touch off a shed load of memories for my fellow students and shipmates.
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  #65  
Old 2nd July 2012, 11:44
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Thanks for jogging the memory a bit Andy .... Stafford-Poizer I certainly remember.
Did you have Mr Lester for GSK?

Was Mr 'Pop' Howard at Standard House whilst you lodged there?
Great guy, always left a downstairs window open if anyone was late back.

The discipline side of things/wearing uniform during the day etc .. I think was basically to try and keep on par with the Royal navy colleges at Devonport, though why the MN needed to match the RN I never knew!

As you say - they were good lecturers there in those days.
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  #66  
Old 2nd July 2012, 12:27
Andy Biegala Andy Biegala is offline  
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If I remember correctly the guy that managed Standard house when I was there was a lecturer by the name of John Hill though I stand to be corrected.

The discipline side of things was due to the fact that you qualified for sea time which counted towards your certificates of competency so the department of trade or whoever required a certain level of seaman like behaviour and the creation of a maritime environment.

Looking back I think it may well have been necessary anyway as we were all quite strong characters given our willingness to absent ourselves from our homes and have an adventure and a framework of rules was probably thought necessary in order to keep some sort of control.

Even then if you think about some of the things that went on it was barely able to keep the lid on.

Looking back it was the strong discipline that made me do the work and somehow got me through I pay tribute here to all the lecturers that worked there.
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  #67  
Old 2nd July 2012, 14:53
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Don't recall a John Hill at all, although I did spend a couple of months at Merriefield Hall when I had to do a resit so he might have been at Standard House then.

Probably yes re the discipline - though I still think the college liked to compete with the RN .. especially in Chiefy Tozer's eyes!!!
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  #68  
Old 10th August 2012, 13:11
shipahoy shipahoy is offline  
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There was Castaways in Union Street.
Also talking of rough houses there was a right dive in the city centre called Noahs Ark Opened the eyes a bit for a lad from rural Bukinghamshire I can tell you
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  #69  
Old 10th August 2012, 20:39
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The Noah's Ark is still be there!

http://www.noahsarkplymouth.co.uk/
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  #70  
Old 18th September 2012, 00:44
Colin Cooper Colin Cooper is offline  
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Plymouth-Great Memories

I did my induction at Plymouth in July 79, and Phase 1 in Sept 80- Mar 81.

I can't remember much at all about the induction, other than being told the names for the "sharp" and "blunt" ends of a boat. As far as Phase 1 is concerned, despite the fact that we were in some pub or other every night for 6 months, it seems as if it were only yesterday.

Other cadets were Mike King and Graham Russell, both Silver Line, Ross Jolliffe, Martin Dacombe and Andy (can't remember) Canadian Pacific, Les Tuckfield Cunard, Pete (Peesare) Green & Sue Shimwell both Shell and Richie Dunham RFA, but to name a few. There were 3 classes doing Phase 1 at the same time, so there was always a bit of mischief going on.

I can only remember a few of the lecturers names from the time. Navigation was a chap called Kapoor. He got us through the exams, but didn't inspire. I felt a bit sorry and embarrassed for him when he had asked a big Geordie Shell cadet, Tom, a question, who responded with "Can you repeat that in English". It was easier to understand Kapoor than it was Tom.
His "propelling" pencil ran out of lead during a chartwork lesson, and he asked to borrow a pencil. I offered him a 12H, which resulted in the remainder of the lesson becoming a lecture on "house-keeping" at sea. What a diversion!
I also got the giggles in one of his classes when I noticed a bit of graffiti on the desk I was sitting at. In black ink, it said "Kapoor is a ****", and immediately below it, a response had been scratched in to the desk which said "I'll drink to that!!" He just happened to be in a foul mood that day and had given a few of us a real pasting. What was on the desk wasn' really that funny, but it was just enough to start the "giggles" When he asked me to share the joke with the rest of the class, who, by now, have started to laugh at me. I of course denied there being any joke, and after a few coughs and deep breaths to steady myself, descended rapidly into uncontrollable hysterics. By this time, the rest of the class have caught up with me, and we're all pissing ourselves. The funny thing at that time, I was the only one who knew why. Given the mood he was in, I decided that I hadn't taken enough "brave pills" that day to tell him straight,
although I did tell the others later on.

I think GSK was a guy called Lester. I enjoyed his classes more than any other. No real memorable highlights or bollockings.

We had two blokes for Seamanship, Bill Favata and a "human Volcano" that went by the name of Lomax. Mike King seemed to be able to wind him up without trying. When we did the Lifeboat certificate, and were in the pool with the upside down inflatable raft, Lomax absolutely lost the plot with Mike, so much so, that we stayed in the middle of the pool fearing that he was going to board the liferaft to kill him. He had to be taken away by Favata to calm down.

We used to go to a local college for Physics on a Friday morning, and after lunch we had a free period which was supervised by an old lecturer. He also took classes in the Planetarium, and would shine that f*&$ing torch with the arrow pointer right into your eyes.

The pubs were ok, and most nights started at the Jolly Miller, and then on to Fiesta (disco) on Fridays and Saturday.I think that was the name of it. It was down towards Union Street. Saturday mornings would be to go down for breakfast, and then back to the room to collect the pre-purchased cans of beer, before heading up to the TV Lounge to watch Tiswas. After dinner on a Sunday a similar pattern was followed with the big attraction being the Professionals. The Plume of Feathers on a Sunday was always a good day out. A great atmosphere. During the week it would be dead.
During the week, after leaving the PoF and driving back over Dartmoor, we used to get Les Tuckfield to switch off his lights to see how far he could drive blind. One night after about 30 seconds, we switched the lights back on, only to find two Dartmoor ponies in the middle of the road about 20 feet away. He was obviously a highly skilled driver, as he went past them balancing the car on the port wheels only. We didn't play that game any more.

I really enjoyed my time in Plymouth. It was a great place to walk around, especially down in the older part of the town. It would be interesting to see what memories the place would trigger.

If you recognise any of the other cadet names above, please let me know. I'd like to say hello after 30 years.

Regards

Colin












There were also quite a few Iranian cadets there at the same time, which was just as the Ayatollah had returned to Iran. More often than not, they'd going off on one or
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  #71  
Old 18th September 2012, 08:15
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Hi Colin ... I was at Plymouth a bit before you I guess, doing my induction there in 1970.

Had Mr Lester for GSK though, Mr Mitchell for Navigation and certainly Mr Favata rings a bell!

Was Bill Currie still Head Warden in the Residential Block - along with Chiefy Tozer for signals .. with semaphore on the roof!!

The PoF was a Wednesday regular as they had the folk band 'The Pheasant Pluckers' playing up there then.
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Old 20th September 2012, 23:10
oldman 80 oldman 80 is offline  
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Hi again Colin.
We met in another forum quite recently.
Plymouth must have been a great college - it produced the best deck cadet I ever came across - and there were many many excellent ones.
Seems they produced another, whom I didn't find out about for thirty years.
"Heavy Weapons" - I can sure understand what you meant, - and the frustration must have been awesome.
(1 case of beer - that was cheap, for sure. A bit of an insult in fact - but that's just typical of those days - big deal - Huh.)
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  #73  
Old 21st September 2012, 01:29
Colin Cooper Colin Cooper is offline  
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Plymouth Days.

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Originally Posted by derekhore View Post
Hi Colin ... I was at Plymouth a bit before you I guess, doing my induction there in 1970.

Had Mr Lester for GSK though, Mr Mitchell for Navigation and certainly Mr Favata rings a bell!

Was Bill Currie still Head Warden in the Residential Block - along with Chiefy Tozer for signals .. with semaphore on the roof!!

The PoF was a Wednesday regular as they had the folk band 'The Pheasant Pluckers' playing up there then.
Hello Derek,

I can't say that I can recall Bill Currie or Chiefy Tozer during my time, although a lot of people probably passed through in the 10 years between our respective stints at the college.

I am positive that it was Lester for GSK. When I arrived at Plymouth for Phase 1, I did receive a colossal bollocking for not sending in all of my correspondence course, with the major gaps being the various drawings of the ship, labelled etc. I was given a week to get it done otherwise I'd be reported to the company. I got them all done at night and duly handed them over. The drawings came back two days later with the comments "You would be more successful as a draughtsman than you will at sea. Well done". I got on well with him as he appeared to appreciate the fact that I could draw pretty well.

I'm sure it was Bill Favata, who was quite a laid back sort of guy. In fact he was a bit of a cool dude with his longer hair and corderouy jacket. He had a very strong accent,possibly from Dorset or somewhere else along the South coast, and when administering praise for something or other, it would always be " Ahhh. There's Lovely" which would come out as "Aaaahhhhttherrrrzzzluuuvvleeee". A bit of "pot and kettle" I suppose coming from a Glaswegian,

The only other person I remember that I could put a face to, and his name was mentioned earlier in this thread, was a John Hill. He featured a lot during our Induction Course, but I can't recall him being involved in any of our classes during Ph1.

I can still see the faces, but can't remember the names.

The Sunday afternoon atmosphere in the PoF was unique, and I am sad to say that I have never seen anywhere like it since. It was good natured bedlam. All publicans and landlords should be given a video of the POF going like the b***dy clappers on a Sunday, to show how things should be done.

All the best & regards

Colin
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  #74  
Old 25th September 2012, 20:55
stephen hodges1 stephen hodges1 is offline  
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plymouth nautical college

I was there from 1970 a rear on smith cadet with tom Lester,terry Davies and nigel Davies.We had a 2 week induction then off for 2 6 month sea trips when we came back to the school for phase 1.Good memories of the school and also Standard house (where I bunked with Derek HORE) remember me Derek old chum? and also later t Merrifield Hall.
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  #75  
Old 25th September 2012, 23:25
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Although I hated the place and would be perfectly content never to see Plymouth again i do recall a funny about the Goodies. As all here will know, lots of cadets on a night on the razzle never got any further than the Goodies and stayed there to get plastered. After a couple of Cunard types (I think) had been given a row by the bar staff they went back on the sunday lunch time in thick submarine surplus rollneck jumpers. Hidden beneath were hotwater bottles full of cold campbell's mixed veg soup, the neck of the hotwater bottles were hidden between their throats and the rollnecks of the jumpers. They lurched up to the bar and got the barstaff's attention by acting all drunk/hungover and then groaned and clutched their stomachs as if vomiting.

This of course squashed the hotwater bottles and the cold veg soup gushed out as if from their mouths, all over the bar, which they then started lapping up! What a picture. Best practical joke ever, I have always thought.
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