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500 kHz Recordings A9M

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  #251  
Old 26th September 2016, 17:24
slick slick is offline  
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Dave,
Thank you.
Yours aye,
slick
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  #252  
Old 17th October 2016, 21:26
johnvvc johnvvc is offline  
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Some New Zealand signals...

So many interesting recordings, thanks Finbar.

Here's a link to some recordings done on the other side of the world. 500 is fairly quiet as these were apparently made when it was all coming to an end. Also an emotional R/T closure message from Wellington Radio.

http://users.iconz.co.nz/rwincer/radiowav.htm
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  #253  
Old 18th October 2016, 12:18
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 khz Recordings from New Zealand

Hello John,

Thank you for posting the link to those recordings from New
Zealand. I have the recordings here, but had lost the link, so good
to have that.

The Auckland Radio station museum web site is well worth a visit,
with lots of photo's, including a circuit diagram for a small
500 khz transmitter they used for test and backup purposes, running
about 50 watts. The output stage uses the good old 807 valve.

The main page link is here

http://musickpointradio.org/musick-m.../radio-museum/

The circuit for the PUP 50 watt transmitter is here :

http://musickpointradio.org/auckland...p-transmitter/

It comes under Technical Notes.

Regards
Finbar EJM retired EI0CF
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  #254  
Old 20th October 2016, 20:32
sven-olof sven-olof is offline  
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Dear Finbar Thanks again for Your efforts to save those relics to future. Its was realy impressive in the 1970s to hear all ROs getting those telegrams trough.

But I Want more 2182 ! If you have
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  #255  
Old 21st October 2016, 00:12
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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#229. Thanks for the info about Auckland Radio. Sent my last radiotelegram, possibly the last from an Australian ship, through ZLD (a Radio Pratique message) in 1992.

John T
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  #256  
Old 21st October 2016, 12:30
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Just on the off chance, I Googled "GYSA" and it turns out to be the call sign of the OCL container ship "Flinders Bay". SWeveral photos of her in the SN Gallery.

John T
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  #257  
Old 21st October 2016, 16:00
johnvvc johnvvc is offline  
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Flinders Bay final voyage...

Quote:
Originally Posted by R651400 View Post
Did the same here before posting and drew a blank.. Can you post your link that came up with "Flinders Bay?"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ddjEr4ihMKM
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  #258  
Old 23rd October 2016, 13:45
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 khz Recordings from New Zealand ZLW ZLD 2182 kHz

Greetings,

This 2182 khz recording of Wellington Radio ZLW, which includes Auckland Radio ZLD, heard on the speaker at ZLW, shortly after their
final close down transmission, was sent to me in 2003 by
David Smith, in New Zealand, who hoped that it would reach a
wider audience.

The background voices indicate that for this historic occasion,
there are probably family and friends of the staff in the operations
room, at the time.

A sad end to marine coast radio station service in New Zealand,
which occured in the early part of 1993.

Regards
Finbar EJM retired EI0CF
Attached Files
File Type: mp3 WellingtonZLWAucklandZLDqrtRTmod1.mp3 (5.26 MB, 51 views)
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  #259  
Old 24th October 2016, 05:27
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Troppo Troppo is offline
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NZ closed its coast radio service in direct contravention of the SOLAS Convention....

6 years too early.
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  #260  
Old 30th October 2016, 19:17
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Hello again DR Finbar, do you have any record from the Portuguese "White Fleet"?
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  #261  
Old 30th October 2016, 20:15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Troppo View Post
NZ closed its coast radio service in direct contravention of the SOLAS Convention....

6 years too early.
Are you sure? Whilst it was compulsory under SOLAS for ships to be equipped with appropriate radio facilities for distress and safety communications, as far as I know it contained no requirements for the provision of such facilities at shore stations in any country. It was an entirely up to each country to decide what, if any, provision it made for communication with ships along its coastline. Hence even prior to GMDSS there were 'third world' countries that had no coast stations and kept no 500kHz or 2182kHz watches equivalent to those mandated for the ships passing along their coastlines.

GMDSS was introduced in 1992, so thereafter any country could choose to provide appropriate 500/2182kHz GMDSS shore distress and safety facilities, pre-GMDSS distress and safety facilities or none at all. All three options (or any mix of the three) were equally legal under SOLAS. New Zealand's decision was in compliance with its undertakings under the SOLAS treaty.
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  #262  
Old 31st October 2016, 00:32
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 khz Recording 2182 khz from 31st December 1996

Greetings,

Here is a cleaned up part of a recording I made on the 31st December 1996. Starts at 2135 UTC.

Several signals from the eastern Meddy, plus a number of UK
coast stations and North Sea supply vessels.

Enjoy

Finbar EJM retired EI0CF
Attached Files
File Type: mp3 2182khz2135To2220utc31121996 (2)Mod1.mp3 (8.89 MB, 41 views)
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  #263  
Old 31st October 2016, 00:37
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Au contraire, Ron.

We have had this debate before.

GMDSS was not compulsory until Feb 1, 1999.

Until that date, ships could merrily (and legally) sail about with a W/T installation.

Administrations had an obligation to maintain compatible infrastructure until that date.

To extend your argument - everyone could have turned off the coast station 5 ton watch in 1992......

As I said to the NZ delegation that visited us (I worked for the Aussie Gov't..) to trumpet their idiotic decision - "what about if a W/T ship was sinking off the NZ coast"....

They looked blankly at me...

Australia maintained our 500 watch until 010001Z FEB 99.
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  #264  
Old 31st October 2016, 00:52
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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#312. Dunno whether it was legal or not but, according to the above final transmissions from NZ, something was said about ships requiring WT or RT services using Australian CRS.

Australia to the rescue! Was this an agreement between the two countries or just a suggested alternative by NZ authorities?

John T
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  #265  
Old 31st October 2016, 02:09
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There was no agreement, John. Just disdain.
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  #266  
Old 31st October 2016, 11:16
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Prior to 1992, the existing distress and safety system (as introduced following the loss of the Titanic in 1912) was a ship-to-ship alerting system. Therefore it was never intended that there should be coast radio stations within the range of every ship - the technology then available would not enable that. It was decided that the operational requirement was that a vessel needing assistance would seek it from nearby vessels. Accordingly ships were mandated to carry appropriate medium-range communications equipment so that in emergency, they were able to alert other ships. All ships were required to maintain manual or automatic watches on the emergency alerting channels.

Over the years, stations were established on land to accept and deliver commercial communications between ships and the shore, over short, medium or long distances as appropriate to their commercial needs. In time some (not all) of those coast stations had their radio facilities incorporated into whatever emergency services were provided by the countries in which the stations were located. Some countries provided no such coast stations, some had only commercial stations, others had commercial stations that also participated fully in the emergency watch-keeping and response services and some even provided full coverage of their coastline with both commercial and separate, dedicated, emergency response radio services. Basically though, when a ship got into trouble and broadcast a call for assistance, the first responder was intended to be another ship.

The GMDSS was introduced in 1992 to change that approach completely - to substitute it with one providing a co-ordinated network of shore facilities, available to be alerted round-the-clock, from anywhere in the world. This network would have the ability to contact appropriately-equipped ships in any part of the world. To this end, ships were mandated to carry suitable equipment such that, in whatever part of the world they sailed, they could alert the shore network, could monitor the emergency communication channels automatically and could also communicate with nearby ships (to enable on-scene communications during any rescue activity). So if the ship travelled only short distances from shore stations, it need only carry short range equipment, regardless of the overall length of the voyage. However even if the voyage was only short, if there was no nearby shore station providing radio coverage of the route, then the ship had to be equipped with longer range facilities capable of alerting a more distant station.

The 1982 establishment of an international alerting system (COSPAS-SARSAT) using polar orbiting satellites capable of picking up emergency alerts from low-power beacons, meant that it became possible to alert a ground station from anywhere in the world (at sea or ashore). The creation in the same year of an international supplier of satellite communications services (INMARSAT) provided a long-range voice and printed text communications medium, available to ships anywhere in the world outside the polar regions.

So 10 years before the GMDSS started, all the necessary tools were in place and by 1992 the equipment was available to ship-owners, at a price below that needed for the 1912 system. It did not need a specialist crew member to operate it. And it was available round-the-clock for commercial communications, not just when a specialist was on watch. It does not seem unreasonable that most shipowners during the 1980s and onwards opted to equip for GMDSS and were keen to get started. The official commencement of the GMDSS in 1992 opened the flood-gates.

Bearing in mind that under SOLAS a country was not required to provide any radio communication facilities for ships, the rapid re-equipment of the international merchant shipping fleet to meet the new regulations posed those countries operating coast stations with a difficult decision - whether or not to retain those elements of the old system that would not be utilised under GMDSS. Could they justify sending their taxpayers money on redundant facilities for the benefit of (largely) foreign shipowners? Some countries decided to keep those old elements until the final implementation deadline of 1999, some terminated them at once. The rest chose a date between the two extremes that met their local constraints and demands - a sort of 'random distribution', as you would expect in a voluntary system. All those options were legal and valid.

The GMDSS was a massive transformation of the emergency communication provisions for seafarers and eventually affected every ship sailing on international voyages. It was carried out in a relatively short time (by the standards of international treaties) and with relatively little disruption. The only real casualties of the entire exercise were those people whose skills were not required by the new system, namely the operating staff at the radio stations both aboard ship and ashore. The provisions made for retraining and redeploying those people affected varied widely from country to country so the impact on them was equally variable. The number of operating staff declined over the 6-year implementation period, with some seeking other career opportunities early on, others taking voluntary redundancy, and some hanging on until the shipowners who employed them opted into the new system. Relatively few seagoing R/Os remained to the very end - MIMCo only had about a dozen still in employment; at coast stations there were probably almost as many as there were at still sea.
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  #267  
Old 31st October 2016, 21:56
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 khz Recording Portuguese "White Fleet"? + 2182 khz

Hello Jose Luis and Sven - olof.

Thank you for your query. I do not understand about the
Portuguese "White Fleet"?. Can you explain ?

I have now added another recording of activity on 2182 khz,
particularly for Sven - olof who has asked for more

I hope you can both enjoy this recording on RT 2182 khz.

Best regards
Finbar EJM retired EI0CF
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  #268  
Old 31st October 2016, 23:57
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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The "White Fleet" was the Portuguese fishing fleet which spent months on the Grand Banks.

John T
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  #269  
Old 1st November 2016, 13:53
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 khz Recording Portuguese "White Fleet"

Hello John T,

Thanks for clearning up that query on the Portuguese White Fleet.

Kind regards
Finbar EJM retired EI0CF
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  #270  
Old 1st November 2016, 14:21
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 khz Malin Head Radio GMH EJM Picture Info request

Greetings,

Having followed the comments started by David Hopcroft re RT
coast station services, including great images.

I have a picture of Malin Head Radio, which was then GMH, though if later than the 31st of December 1949, would be EJM, what year or period this was taken. The image provided by David shows a DF
receiver with a clock on top, so similar to that in my picture.

The unit to the rear is, I believe the start up and control panel for the main transmitter.

The suits worn by the two staff would suggest the 1940's, but it may be earlier or later.

Equipment for Malin Head Radio was supplied by the IOWT ( Inspector of Wireless Telegraphy) in London, until, I presume, the station was fully handed over to the Irish Republic when we left the Commonwealth and became a Republic. The equipment type would bear out, as shown by David's images.

Any information would be of great interest and assistance.

Kind regards
Finbar EJM GMH EI0CF
Attached Images
File Type: jpg CharlieDonovanEJMadjusted1.jpg (264.4 KB, 49 views)
File Type: jpg Rx.jpg (241.4 KB, 50 views)
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  #271  
Old 1st November 2016, 20:36
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In Finbars 2182 recording, only two voices heard from different UK coast stations. That would be one at GLD and the other at GND keeping the 2182 watch for the UK coast. This is only 4 years before the end, so does bear out Ron in #315 that only the staff were impacted on. Manual systems required people and they were getting expensive............the rest is not rocket science. I took my money and ran in 1995.

David
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  #272  
Old 1st November 2016, 21:38
sven-olof sven-olof is offline  
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Thanks. Quite heavy intensity new years eve.
A question about 2182 -How was the last years ? (I was a little bit busy and didnt watch as I did during 1970-1993 cirka)
When I came back to the rig some 10 years after it was all quiet.
Just wonder and assuming that the shipping continued to raise the last years. - But how was the occupation on 2182 and manners, dicipline etc
Would it even have been possible to keep on and without DSC GMDSS
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  #273  
Old 2nd November 2016, 20:17
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2182 went from not knowing which way was up, to sat watching a screen which said 'Do Something or You Will Be Logged off' because you hadn't for 30 minutes !

David
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  #274  
Old 8th November 2016, 15:31
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 khz Burnham-on-Sea GRL ALRS Vol 1 1950 listing

Greetings,

I note that David Hopcroft is looking for Burnham-on-Sea details.

Looking at both my ALRS Vol 1 from 1950 and 1951, it is listed
with all the details, also note part of the GKA information of the
period.

Hope this clears up the specific information on it's frequencies,
including 1616 khz.

A scan of the page is attached.

Regards
Finbar EJM retired EI0CF
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File Type: jpg Burnham-on-Sea GRL Mod2 001.jpg (187.4 KB, 46 views)
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  #275  
Old 8th November 2016, 19:31
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Thank You Finbar
On an MF only fitted ship of 1912grt with a T10A & G12/13 Rx, 1612khz was much easier as you didn't have to change from one Rx to another.

David
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