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500 kHz Recordings A9M

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  #51  
Old 18th August 2015, 11:20
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R651400 View Post
What's not foc today?
Hope it does the same for its present day 2015 employees as 1959 with a R/O pay scale beyond the dreams of avarice plus added bonus of no MN bullsh!t.
Unfortunately, I don't think it does, that's why the MN is the baileywick of former commies and other third worlders.

Q: "Any Geordies aboard?" A: "Я не понима́ю." (Ya nyee paneemayou - or somat like that).

John T

Last edited by trotterdotpom; 18th August 2015 at 11:48.. Reason: Add "is"
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  #52  
Old 19th August 2015, 16:44
Manchester Manchester is offline  
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Which begs the question they must've had a lot of ships to run out from P3AA to P3ZZ..

The problem nowadays is that any pleasure craft fitted with VHF DSC etc needs a callsign. So they soon run out.
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  #53  
Old 28th August 2015, 15:30
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 kHz Recordings Last QTC at EJM 421 khz Dec 1988

I made the attached recording on the 31st Dec 1988, using a
radio/cassette machine perched on top of the 500 khz
operating position rack.
Being rostered for this duty entailed sending the final close down
broadcast for Malin Head Radio EJM , on 500 khz. (This
part of the recording is not included in this clip).

This recording gives the "feel" of a coast radio station, with
MF RT and VHF in the background, plus 500, and at the begining
425 khz and the Russian vessel sending me 2 QTC's, which
turned out to be the very last CW messages received at EJM.

The old typewriter clacking away as I typed his MSG's were soon
to be history. A year later we went to full computer logging and
the typewriters sat forlorn in storage in the emergency generator
building.

Note GCC, GNF, GLD, plus DAO, CUL, FFM, 7TA and an Italian
ship calling IAR, on 500 khz. Still plenty of activity on MF
in December 1988.

During this period, Malin Head operated as a two man station,
dropping to one during meal breaks. That set up of an RT Link
Call by me, to Spain, indicates I was on my own with 500,
2182, and VHF 16 and working channels all on speakers. Getting
the levels right was a delicate balance between hearing or
audible mayhem. However, normally, 500 was always a headphone
watch, with a 2 hour changeover system between WT and RT
watch positions. The IF band CW service on 1615 khz / 1623 khz had closed in 1986. This was covered on the RT position and
had been a busy service in earlier years, for trawlers around Iceland,
the White Sea the west coast of Norway. Those trawler RO's were
great operators working with relatively low power and compromised antennas for MF CW. Wick, Oban and Cullercoats radio's provided
a similar service, with all of us using specific operating time slots.

I hope you have enjoyed some my recordings of Marine Radio,
which gives some idea of what was once a vibrant and important
method of communication for ships both for safety and commerce.

Thankfully Malin Head Radio still continues it's service on MF and VHF.

Best regards
Finbar MalinheadRadio/EJM
Attached Files
File Type: mp3 Last500EJM88CLIPm.mp3 (5.44 MB, 142 views)
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  #54  
Old 28th August 2015, 16:27
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Ron Stringer Ron Stringer is offline
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As you say, Finbar, plenty of activity. However I can't believe that when I was at sea in the early 1960s one would have been able to pick up some of the more distant stations in the same way. The level of activity on 500kHz was so much higher that anything more that a couple of hundred miles away was swamped by the numerous, nearer signals. Exceptions were DAN and PCH but stations such as FFM or 7TA would have been blotted out.

In the English Channel, it was often quite difficult to pick up UK coast stations, never mind the distant foreigners! Probably different in the middle of the night but I tended to keep normal watches i.e. 2-hourly segments between 0800Z and 2220Z.
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  #55  
Old 29th August 2015, 16:37
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 kHz Recordings Traffic density and DX

Hello Ron and Malcolm,

Yes, I agree, traffic density on 500 khz precluded hearing
long distant stations, certainly from this part of Europe, however
the Pacific seemed to be good for long haul reception on MF.

I searched for my little notebook of 500 khz loggings, made
from 1988, particularly at work, where I put up a spare RX on
5 Ton. Needless to say I can't find it just now, typical.

However, from memory, and noteworthy, ie two Chinese
coast stations, sending their CQ's, around 1920 utc.

KFS from the west coast of the USA, again with his CQ, at
0830 utc, just as I was finishing a night duty. My best
and confirmed by the R/O on board, was a ship in the Pacific,
calling Callo, in Peru ( could not call him as EJM's transmitters
were already dismanted at that stage, in the 1990's).
I was so amazed I looked up the ships Sat Phone number and
rang the ship, to confirm he really was in the Pacific Ocean. Time
of reception 0210 utc, on a night duty at EJM.

I read with interest on a web site dedicated to Awuara Radio
on the south island of New Zealand, that they copied
Malin Head Radio , on 2182 khz. This was back in the early
1970's. The late, sadly missed, Graham Mercer of GPK, worked
loads of ships on MF RT, at huge distances. Perhaps someone
can remember some of these achievements, having availed of
a QRJ , link call, home , to the UK, at local rates. Happier days
indeed.

Best regards
Finbar EJM
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  #56  
Old 18th September 2015, 13:05
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 kHz Recordings GLD XXX Lucky rescue for crew

The attached picture is a scan of two pages from
a Malin Head Radio EJM 500 kHz log from 20th June 1953.

The rescue of 5 men by the British ship Scholar / GDCC is
noteworthy and details how lucky the crew of the vessel
Krack were in being saved by the very alert crew of the
Scholar.

There are a number of interesting loggings on just these two
pages.

Note that PCH gives 135 kcs to a ship for a working frequency.
They were still using Longwave, as were a number of other
coast radio stations, at that time.

GBTT calling GBSS.

Plenty of reasonable distant signals despite being mid Summer.

I just could not squeeze in the times on the first page, the scanner
not being big enough to accomodate everything.

This is a handwritten log, before the typewriter and subsequent
computer logging that followed many years later.

Regards
Finbar Malin Head Radio EJM ( retired )
Attached Images
File Type: jpg MalinHeadRadioLogJune1953FileMod1.jpg (254.5 KB, 89 views)
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  #57  
Old 19th September 2015, 09:50
johnvvc johnvvc is offline  
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Interesting thread and great recordings from Finbar, keep ‘em coming!

I worked at AngleseyRadio/GLV for a while and have some good memories.

As has been mentioned working nights when most God fearing people were in bed meant 500 was relatively quiet and as Finbar’s tapes show, stations from far away could be heard quite regularly. The furthest one I heard from GLV was Bombay (VWB?) who just popped up out of the blue, perfectly readable then was gone. We used to work North American East coast stations on 500 regularly always with good reports both ways, we’d often call them around Xmas time to exchange greetings, I’d sometimes call a couple during the night if I was bored! There was one in the St Lawrence whose callsign I can’t remember, he was always strong with us. Anyone who has listened on the Medium Wave late at night/early morning will have heard North American broadcast stations coming through with good signals, VOCM in St. John’s NFD being a regular. Propagation is a wonderful thing!

I had a friend who worked at SAE on Gotland Island up in the Baltic and we used to have a chat on working frequencies in the wee small hours when it was quiet, no doubt the authorities would have taken a dim view if they knew! I’d met him when I was at sea years before.

Graham at GPK was mentioned earlier. I did hear a story about a five letter call (an aircraft) coming up on R/T calling Portpatrick for a report and Graham answered. Signals both ways were weak but copiable and when Graham asked for the plane’s location it turned out he was on the runway at Stanley down in the Falklands! Now I can’t vouch for that one, it may well be an urban myth but knowing Graham’s ability to winkle out the weak ones I can just believe it…

The only aircraft I worked on 2182 was MPUUC who I seem to remember used to occasionally come up for a radio check.

Happy days.
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  #58  
Old 19th September 2015, 17:33
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Graham was a master of the amateur top band around 1800 Khz. He was adept at use of greyline comms and told me himself of amateur QSOs with extremely distant stations. He also mentioned working ships in the Indian ocean on GPKs working frequency of 1883 Khz also via greyline.
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  #59  
Old 20th September 2015, 15:55
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 kHz Recordings Night duty log and distant stations

Glad you are finding the log book record from Malin Head Radio
interesting. I am enjoying the comments and replies concerning
fellow R/O's experiences.

It was mentioned earlier about traffic density preventing the
reception of stations further afield. True, but conditions also
played their part.

The attached page was chosen to show the range of stations
being heard in the early hours of the 6th of December 1961.

From Prins Christians Sund, in Greenland, to Odessa in Ukraine.

Noted are the following on 500 kHz.

FFY Le Havre Port

UDE Odessa in the Black Sea.

SPH Gydnia

SUH Alexandria in Egypt

OZN Prins Christians Sund Greenland

6VA Dakar Senegal calling EAO Palma de Mallorca (Soller)

VPT Malta ( St Georges )

TAH Istanbul Turkey

More daytime loggings are available and show a huge range,
mainly of UK ships working on 500, mainly to UK, Irish,
and near Continent coast stations. I can scan these if people
are interested.

Regards
Finbar
Attached Images
File Type: jpg MalinHeadRadioLog6thDec1961Mod4.jpg (413.9 KB, 59 views)
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  #60  
Old 21st September 2015, 05:44
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Great work, Finbar. Many thanks.
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  #61  
Old 24th September 2015, 13:58
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 kHz Recordings MV Aigeorgis 5B2165 Lisbon 1975

Attached is a picture of my last ship, before going ashore.

It is the MV Aigeorgis callsign 5B2165 pictured alongside
at Lisbon. This ship was an MF only installation, with Reliance
transmitter and Mercury and Electra receivers. Tonnage
around 2000 tons only. We traded in the Meddy, sailing
from Avonmouth. I worked Niton Radio GNI in the early
hours of the morning to get traffic back to the UK, from the
Med. Ship owners were Kappa Maritime. A crew of 12
comprising of 7 nationalities.

I would be very interested to know of what consequently
happened to this ship, pictures and or history.

I also have a picture of the tiny radio room and gear, which
was straight off the bridge, just enough room to squeeze
in and sit down. The only RT was a simple VHF set on the
bridge.

Regards
Finbar
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File Type: jpg Aigeorgis5B2165Lisbon1975.jpg (428.7 KB, 72 views)
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  #62  
Old 22nd October 2015, 12:27
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 kHz Recordings GNAR de EJM Ringtone

Whilst still serving at Malin Head Radio EJM one of the guys at work
heard my mobile phone ringtone and mentioned that he would love to have one featuring his favourite ship when he was at sea. Callsign
GNAR. Can't member the name of the ship.

I offered to make a recording, which he now uses on his phone.
This is attached for use as a ringtone by anybody who would like to
use it, for the same purpose.

I added a bit of background to add to the feeling of a live transmission.

Regards
Finbar EJM ( Retired )
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File Type: mp3 GNARdeEJM2.mp3 (221.0 KB, 126 views)
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  #63  
Old 3rd November 2015, 15:10
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 kHz Recordings Cyprus Radio 5BA

Greetings,

Here is another of my 500 kHz recordings , this time in 1995.

This time it's Cyprus Radio 5BA. You can also hear the ship he is
working, though much weaker. As far as I can make out, the ship
gives 454 as a working frequency, when requested by 5BA.

This is a rare catch. I don't seem to remember hearing 5BA too
often, on 500.

Recording made at my home , near Malin Head.

Regards
Finbar ( EJM Retired )
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File Type: mp3 5BA311295Mod1.mp3 (680.8 KB, 84 views)
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  #64  
Old 29th November 2015, 16:11
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 khz Recording 29th March 1994 GNI TAH SUH etc

Greetings,

The attached recording was made in the early hours of the
29th March 1994.

Note the signals from GNI, struggling to get a ship to move
and be heard on his working frequency. SUH calling several
times with traffic. XXX from IPB. Traffic lists from SPH, TAH,
IAR, EAL, EAC, DAN, finishing up with a Nav wng announcement
from VON in Canada.

OST , TFA and OXZ also feature, as do others.

Recording was made from my home in Malin.

Enjoy.

Regards
Finbar ( EJM retired )
Attached Files
File Type: mp3 500khz290394BSelection.mp3 (9.51 MB, 134 views)
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  #65  
Old 29th November 2015, 19:20
holland25 holland25 is offline  
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Its over 50 years since I last used Morse in anger and I haven't really kept up with it,but listening to that last clip did I detect that working frequencies on MF were being quoted with a decimal point?
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  #66  
Old 29th November 2015, 20:01
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I too was struck by how little was going on and was also shocked by the change in DAN - once an outstanding Morse station with immaculate sending. Those transmissions could have been from a first-tripper, not the much-respected German coast station of yore.
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  #67  
Old 29th November 2015, 21:21
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by holland25 View Post
Its over 50 years since I last used Morse in anger and I haven't really kept up with it,but listening to that last clip did I detect that working frequencies on MF were being quoted with a decimal point?
Are you confusing an oblique stroke with a full stop, Holland? GNI directed some ship to use its working frequency by sending the ship frequency and the GNI frequency separated by a stroke. I didn't listen all the way through but I didn't hear any decimal points.

Ron, DAN sounded as though the operator was using an anal retentive bug key. Is it possible that they could be typing into a computer which translates it into morse? Not sure why they would do that though.

John T
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  #68  
Old 29th November 2015, 21:34
holland25 holland25 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trotterdotpom View Post
Are you confusing an oblique stroke with a full stop, Holland? GNI directed some ship to use its working frequency by sending the ship frequency and the GNI frequency separated by a stroke. I didn't listen all the way through but I didn't hear any decimal points.

Ron, DAN sounded as though the operator was using an anal retentive bug key. Is it possible that they could be typing into a computer which translates it into morse? Not sure why they would do that though.

John T
Probably, I have to admit that I have problems reading Morse, I thought I heard a sequence of numbers with an r in them which I thought was a short hand decimal. It seemed a lot quieter than in my day. (Old mans statement).
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  #69  
Old 29th November 2015, 21:53
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Could be, Holland. I also noticed EAL had trouble sending "tfc". They were always a bit rubbish but you could have a laugh in Las Palmas.

John T
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  #70  
Old 29th November 2015, 23:20
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Coming in rather late on this thread. Memories of sitting in the wireless office of a UASC K class, listening on the traffic list from Portishead (I was the lecky) while the R.O was causing mayhem in the bar. A9M forever imprinted on my brain. Same as GGHA from my RFA days - for ever remembered.


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  #71  
Old 29th November 2015, 23:56
jimg0nxx jimg0nxx is online now  
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Holland you did hear r used as a decimal, XXX de IPB info nr 1 qsw 514r5.

EAL announced tfc list qsw 446.5 using full decimal in morse.
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  #72  
Old 30th November 2015, 00:10
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Originally Posted by jimg0nxx View Post
Holland you did hear r used as a decimal, XXX de IPB info nr 1 qsw 514r5.

EAL announced tfc list qsw 446.5 using full decimal in morse.
Missed that - I'll have to have a listen right through. Seems a bit unnecessary doing the .5 kcs on medium wave.

John T
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  #73  
Old 30th November 2015, 08:42
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Could it be that receivers had become so selective with dial up frequencies that even on M/F 0.5kcs out would affect reception? Hard to believe with some of the ancient kit I sailed with where you were up and down the band trying to find someone.
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  #74  
Old 30th November 2015, 09:41
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Varley Varley is online now   SN Supporter
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Had there been an ITU tightening of tolerances to allow more 'channels'?
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  #75  
Old 30th November 2015, 13:27
jimg0nxx jimg0nxx is online now  
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Quote:
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Had there been an ITU tightening of tolerances to allow more 'channels'?
That seems a reasonable assumption. In the sixties the only European station I recollect above 500 Kc/s was IAR on 516 Kc/s.
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