Otaki's Sulzers - Page 2 - Ships Nostalgia
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Otaki's Sulzers

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  #26  
Old 25th January 2009, 18:44
greyman14 greyman14 is offline  
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OTAKI - Sulzers

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobs View Post
Does anyone know what the type designation was of the two 12-cylinder Sulzer diesels in the 1953-built Otaki. I do know they had a cobined output of 11,500bhp, 580mm bore and a stroke of 760mm, so they would have been 12??58 or 12???58. What were the missing letters?
Interesting query Bob - but i cannot recall the detail that you ask for -it ) was such a long time ago! I was one of the three Apprentice deck cadets on board in 1953 . I remember being storm ridden in the Hurricane Hazel off Cork with two Sulzer Railway Locos on deck!! Lets see OTAKI had two Sulzer diesels - with a magnetic coupling which was not as much trouble as the 16 cyl Sulzer deisels in the SURREY which i remember breaking down in the Indian Ocean 12 times outward bound - 3 days adrift - ALL hands below decks to repair etc. and again breaking down 12 times homeward bound from Aussie land. They were jinxed !!
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  #27  
Old 21st June 2010, 18:13
alan dd alan dd is offline  
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Otaki was my first ship as an engineer cadet in 1974. Still remember it well after all these years.
I understood that the engines were Sulzer RSG's and had also heard that they were designed for power stations.
I also remember so-called "death alley" between the two engines, the engines were fitted the same way round, so the exhaust manifold for the stbd engine was between the two engines. Usually the engines on twin engined ships are 'handed' and fitted with the exhausts on the outboard sides but not the Otaki. Taking the piston return temps on the stbd engine involved legging it down death alley at a fair rate of knots to avoid hot oil drips and such - if the fourth on watch thought I'd flogged the temps he sent me back down there again!
A lot of the engineers reckoned you should have been awarded the Victoria Cross for sailing on her! The Victoria Cross awarded to a the previous Otaki was in a glass case on the saloon bulkhead when I sailed on her.
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  #28  
Old 21st June 2010, 19:01
Malky Glaister Malky Glaister is offline  
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Just come across this thread. An SAD 72 engine was fitted to Donaldsons Letitia, built in Switzerland the engine was i9nstalled at Hall Russel in Aberdeen about 1964 possibly earlier. I sailed on the ship , then BIBI with J and js. The engine was a 6 cylinder and ran at about 125 rpm. It had two scavenge pumps and a turbo blower. Not really a charger! The scavenge pumps were driven from the crossheads by levers. The pistons were of tghe extended skirt type and sat down on the crossheads. ie there were no piston rods. The engine ran very well indeed and caused no trouble. The main job was to keep the scavenge and exhaust ports clear of carbon. The SAD engines were the first of the loop scavenge types. They were foolwed by RD, RND, RNDM and then the poppet valve types.
Hope this is of some interest if a little late.
regards Malky
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  #29  
Old 9th November 2010, 19:56
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PeterH PeterH is offline  
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Also just found this thread.
I sailed deep sea as a cadet on the Surrey in 1967. She was powered by the same class of engines as the Otaki - RSG Sulzers - only 8 cyl. version, not 12.
After sailing on the Haparangi with Doxfords, these "medium speed" (250 rpm I think) Sulzers were a real pain - especially the scavenge valves and individual scavenge pumps.
"Death Alley" was also well named! As we manoeuvered into port (London or Liverpool) the port engine had a hot piston and the 2/E, Chris Kenrick (I believe the first NZSCo cadet to get his 2nd's ticket at age 23) together with the Chief Freezer, Chorley Jack, were spraying the piston in the entablature. There was a crankcase explosion which crossed over to the starboard engine! It was a hell of a bang (I was not on watch at the time) but luckily Chris suffered only burns to his arm and Chorley Jack had his hair burnt! Don't ask me why the C/F was helping the 2/E with this job - the spotlessly-overalled Freezers were seldom seen in the oily engineroom!
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  #30  
Old 10th November 2010, 23:21
cubpilot cubpilot is offline  
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Peter, I have lost your email address can you pm me or try a direct email, i think you have my current one. Howard
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  #31  
Old 27th August 2012, 20:32
Garethed Garethed is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Haywood View Post
Hi Garethed I remember that engine explosion well enough. I had just joined as Ist Refrig Eng. Yes we were running engine trials when the stb? engine blew out through the explosion ports that were above the starting platform. Hell of a mess down below with foot plates blown into the bilges etc. I remember visting the engineers and a cadet in the seamans hospital with very bad flash burns.
Hi Tom

Only just looked again at this thread. Interesting to hear you were 1st Fridge at the time, but we were not on board long enough to have got to know each other. Did you sail with the ship after the explosion?
There were 3 eng cadets - we were the most seriously injured along with the Chief if I remember correctly, who was wearing a short sleeve boiler suit. I still have the scars on my arms, but my face is Ok now. It was a close one.

Peter Edwards
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  #32  
Old 27th August 2012, 21:28
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Please don't take this as just a silly comment, is there an idiots guide to marine engines? It took me a bit to work out how rotary plane engines worked, then I found a maintenance manual for the "Viper" and got my head round that.

I think I am right in saying that this is a wider subject and not one that can be easily summarised for an idiot, but if anyone can come up with that kind of thing, I would be very grateful.
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  #33  
Old 27th August 2012, 23:59
Les Gibson Les Gibson is offline  
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And I thought we had a hard time on a 'P'' type Doxford!!! Hats off to all of you guys who sailed on those with the Sulzers. It was like reading a horror comic. One thing comes over loud and clear though: The hard working ships were always the happiest ships for the engine room staff..
My regards and deepest respects to all of you.
Les Gibson
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  #34  
Old 28th August 2012, 17:55
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Duncan112 Duncan112 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmer John View Post
Please don't take this as just a silly comment, is there an idiots guide to marine engines? It took me a bit to work out how rotary plane engines worked, then I found a maintenance manual for the "Viper" and got my head round that.

I think I am right in saying that this is a wider subject and not one that can be easily summarised for an idiot, but if anyone can come up with that kind of thing, I would be very grateful.
Most of the good books are expensive but this website may be of some use http://www.marineengineering.org.uk/- I was cadet with the creator, Brian Beattie but haven't seen him since phase 3 (Photo of him here!! https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/galler...chards/cat/500)

This book may help .. http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=sr_nr_...qid=1346169083
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  #35  
Old 28th August 2012, 18:46
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Farmer John Farmer John is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duncan112 View Post
Most of the good books are expensive but this website may be of some use http://www.marineengineering.org.uk/- I was cadet with the creator, Brian Beattie but haven't seen him since phase 3 (Photo of him here!! https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/galler...chards/cat/500)

This book may help .. http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=sr_nr_...qid=1346169083
Thank you very much, I shall work away on that. Blimey, that book is expensive in up-to-date edition. Think I would go for the 1965 edition.

Last edited by Farmer John; 28th August 2012 at 18:52..
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  #36  
Old 29th August 2012, 09:55
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A.D.FROST A.D.FROST is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobs View Post
Does anyone know what the type designation was of the two 12-cylinder Sulzer diesels in the 1953-built Otaki. I do know they had a cobined output of 11,500bhp, 580mm bore and a stroke of 760mm, so they would have been 12??58 or 12???58. What were the missing letters?


Attachment 29730Attachment 29731

Last edited by A.D.FROST; 18th July 2013 at 18:27..
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  #37  
Old 30th August 2012, 01:33
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Doxfordman Doxfordman is offline  
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Seeing those pictures....

The nightmares return!!!
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  #38  
Old 30th August 2012, 17:52
DIBs DIBs is online now  
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My MNTB Cadet Training Book says; SULZER R.S.G.58 . Ready,Steady,Go.

DIBs
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  #39  
Old 31st August 2012, 00:43
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Doxfordman Doxfordman is offline  
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Quote from my "Purple Peril"
Mv Essex, NZSCo, built by john Brown Clydebank April 1954.
10936.07 GRT, 6086.66 NRT, 12550 DWT (Summer)
Length 525' 91/2", Beam 70', Draft 30' 73/8" (Summer)
2x 12 Cylinder Sulzer RSG coupled to single shaft via magnetic couplings.
580mm bore, 760mm stroke.
Built by Sulzer (John Brown)
10,900 BHP @ 117 RPM, 11,500 BHP @ 228 RPM
Cochren composite boiler 120 psi, dry saturated.
2,355.1 tons HO, 325.2 tons DO.
Ave fuel cons 39 tons per day HO.
Specific fuel cons 0.405 lbs/SHP/HR
FW Capacity 421.4 tons.
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