Salmara - Ships Nostalgia
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  #1  
Old 21st October 2007, 21:55
Jim S Jim S is online now   SN Supporter
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Salmara

The magazine "Shipping Today & Yesterday" has been running a series of enjoyable articles - "From Cadet to Commodore" by Commodore Gibb.
In the latest installment in the November edition he recalls life on the 1956 built Salmara. He is less than complimentary about the Doxford engine - "Each voyage was a nightmare for the Engineering staff as breakdowns occurred with monotonous regularity - there were scavenge fires, bits broke off or fell off". -- This was 1962 so the ship should still have been in her prime.
He says the "Doxford Type J were dreadful".
Firstly would any of the Doxford men care to comment?
Is he right to say the engines were J-Type? I thought the J-Type was introduced in early 1960's.
I believe the engines were built by John Brown - I find it hard to believe they would have built such a bad engine or could it be, and I say this with the greatest respect that at the time P & O was a predominately steam turbine company
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  #2  
Old 22nd October 2007, 10:30
Tony Breach Tony Breach is offline
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1956 I would have thought a Doxford LB but I'm sure someone with more knowledge than I will respond in detail.
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  #3  
Old 20th May 2008, 00:33
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Sunda Sunda is offline  
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I did a trip on "Salmara" to Singapore, Malaysia and Bangkok in 1965 as a Deck Apprentice. Both she and her sister, "Salsette" had a bad reputation for main engine breakdowns. Although we only had one minor incident on my trip I knew people who had far worse experience.

I don't know any technical details or why this should have happened. In those days the Deck Officers were not supposed to know, or even be interested, in what went on down below. During my time on board I did actually spend a couple of weeks in the engine room to comply with a directive from head office that it would be a good learning experience. All I can remember was that it was very hot.
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  #4  
Old 20th May 2008, 21:27
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Organisation: Merchant Navy
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Active: 1952 - 1965
 
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P&O ships 1952/3 25 steam ships and 10 motor ships. 2 of the steamers were turbo-electric.
MV Salmara. Doxford 2SA 6 cylinder. 8000bhp
MV Salsette Doxford type 2SCSA opposed piston diesel @ 8000bhp.

Last edited by R58484956; 20th May 2008 at 21:42..
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  #5  
Old 3rd December 2011, 06:59
landlocked landlocked is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim S View Post
The magazine "Shipping Today & Yesterday" has been running a series of enjoyable articles - "From Cadet to Commodore" by Commodore Gibb.
In the latest installment in the November edition he recalls life on the 1956 built Salmara. He is less than complimentary about the Doxford engine - "Each voyage was a nightmare for the Engineering staff as breakdowns occurred with monotonous regularity - there were scavenge fires, bits broke off or fell off". -- This was 1962 so the ship should still have been in her prime.
He says the "Doxford Type J were dreadful".
Firstly would any of the Doxford men care to comment?
Is he right to say the engines were J-Type? I thought the J-Type was introduced in early 1960's.
I believe the engines were built by John Brown - I find it hard to believe they would have built such a bad engine or could it be, and I say this with the greatest respect that at the time P & O was a predominately steam turbine company
I sailed on Both the Salsette and Salmara from Jnr Eng through to Third Eng 1963 - 1967 being originally a H&W B&W man they were my first intro to Doxfords. While I sailed on them I do not recall any major failure or incidient on either ship. Then we had a great crew of engineers led by two of the best Chief Engineers I 've ever had the pleasure of sailing with Tony Peach (Peachy) and Nick Morrow.

NMcf
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  #6  
Old 5th December 2011, 21:19
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Doxfordman Doxfordman is offline  
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Would certainly have been a Doxford LBD from 1956. The Doxford J type was an excellent engine, probably the best engine Doxfords ever built.
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  #7  
Old 7th June 2012, 07:34
dmrowden dmrowden is offline  
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Salsette and Salmarra Engines

It would seem that "landlocked" (NMcf) missed all the action. I joined the "Salsette" as a deck apprentice in 1961, and my second trip on her commenced in December 1961, the usual 4 month trip to the Far East. Upon reaching the Indian Ocean we seemed to have problems with "cooling elbows'', particularly in No 5 unit which meant steaming at reduced speed for a day, then drifting for a day whilst some sort of work was carried out. You engineering chaps will have to excuse my lack of technical knowledge on all this ! By the time we reached Singapore, we anchored in the bay for several days, whilst No 5 main bearing was relined, but following trials in the bay, the unit was back to its problems. We then sailed to HongKong on five units, and spent two weeks in Taikoo DY (great for us deck apprentices on day work), during which time engineers sent out from Doxfords decided that the main shaft was bent under No 5 unit. So Head Office told us to load as much cargo as could be arranged, and sail back to the UK on five units. This gave us a max speed of about 8 or 9 knots, so was long trip. Limited fuel was taken on at Aden, as the ship was destined for repairs at South Shields (?), and this created its own problems and some anxious moments when severe rolling in the Bay of Biscay caused a loss of suction from the fuel tanks. We arrived back in mid June '62, a trip of six and a half months. The master at this time was Peter Reed, and I left to join the "Coromandel" so I have no experience with the repairs carried out, but I am sure that Ian Gibb's comments were basically correct. This opposed piston engine was a truly incredible sight to watch, - when it was running.
But this was not the only engine problem with the "Salsette", as I believe she suffered engine failure earlier in her life, and was towed home by the company's "Aden", as well as the problems on the "Salmara" experienced by our fellow contributor "Sunda".
There is a photo posted in the Cargo Ships Gallery of "Salsette" moored at Jarrow Slake Tyneside in Sept 1962, probably taken whilst she was under repair.

David
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