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  #51  
Old 31st January 2007, 16:37
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Just to throw my hat in the ring how about Duke of Lancaster/Argyll/Rothsea.
Now they looked like ships
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  #52  
Old 31st January 2007, 18:22
Anderskane Anderskane is offline  
 
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I have to agree with Tmac1720 , after the height of summer season on Belfast- Heysham, the "Lancaster" would have done a couple of "cruises",to Portugal & Med.
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  #53  
Old 31st January 2007, 18:45
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Best Ferry Design

The "Avalon" mentioned earlier was a very fine looking vessel and one on which I served. She too fitted in service as a small cruise liner with her role on the Harwich-Hook run. I'm referring to her in her original build and not following conversion to a floating garage.
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  #54  
Old 1st February 2007, 09:40
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An opinion from down under would say that the USS CO's RANGATIRA (1972) would have to be one of the worlds best looking roro ferries. Well proportioned and with sleek lines plus she was a very good sea boat.I have to say she didn't look as good out of USS Co colours so it doesn't count after she left our waters.
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  #55  
Old 2nd February 2007, 03:22
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Originally Posted by Coastie View Post
Had this thread included ferries which are out of service, even if they are in service in another country, I would have put the St Columba. (Think Cambers 21 might just agree with me there.)
Damn, I meant Cambers 49, not 21, (although I think Cambers 21 would also agree with me)
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  #56  
Old 2nd February 2007, 04:01
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emmanuel Makarios View Post
An opinion from down under would say that the USS CO's RANGATIRA (1972) would have to be one of the worlds best looking roro ferries. Well proportioned and with sleek lines plus she was a very good sea boat.I have to say she didn't look as good out of USS Co colours so it doesn't count after she left our waters.
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I'm with Emmanuel on RANGATIRA. I saw her when she was new and she was a stunning looking vessel.
Sadly, she proved to be uneconomical and when I next saw her she was looking rather sad as an accommodation vessel at the Howard Doris construction yard in Loch Kishorn.

http://www.bluestarline.org/rangatira.html
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  #57  
Old 2nd February 2007, 07:11
cambria49 cambria49 is offline
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Well, I would struggle to name any one ship, the criteria seems to be far and wide. Mention of the Avalon for example; although a beautiful ship her very design was her downfall - a steamer which should have been diesel, a passenger vessel which should have been a car ferry. Five years after her debut she was relegated at Harwich by the car ferry St George. Why? Because she was hopelessly out of date.

Seven years the Avalon's seniors were the Heysham Dukes; again beautiful ships built built in an era on the verge of change.

The St Columba was indeed a fine ship, strong and well-built for her specified task - mixing classic passengers with ro/ro traffic. But again, as was seen when the St David arrived at Holyhead in 1981 she struggled with increasing freight levels.

So, best designed British ferry? For me it would fall to the St David the similar St Anselm, St Christopher and Galloway Princess. 26 years after entering service the St David remains in UK operation as Stena Line's Stena Caledonia.

And of today's world services - gee where to begin? But I would certainly rate:

Stena Adventurer
Ulysses
Superfast vessels
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  #58  
Old 2nd February 2007, 09:08
Locking Splice Locking Splice is offline  
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Morning All,

This has been an interesting thread, vearing off in several direction's however, like Cambria, I cannot say what is the best designed ferry, passenger or car. Their have been some excellent examples from all over the globe, the Rangitaria was certianly a stunner, the Tor Britiannia/Scandinavia were also good lookers. Never saw a mention of Normandy Ferries Dragoon and Lepoard (very stylish). Of the newer generation I have no favourites (sorry but they just do not reach the parts that the older ones did).
Best looking passenger Ferry for me is the Avalon, like Cambria said well out of her time, must have been been great for the crew having those mini cruise's to look foward too each season. Also liked the Duke of Lancaster, nice lines, and the crew again very lucky between 1958 and 1966 having 7 short mini cruises, especially the 13 day trip in 1964 and again 1965 that went to Lisbon and Corunna, her other cruises, being mainly the Scottish Islands, continental ports (Amsterdam Antwerp, Ostend) and the Baltic in 1962.
Best RORO design purely personal as I was her Bosun when first built in 1987 and had to work her was the Pride of Dover, easy to load , good sea ship and still doing the job orignily built for.
Best Ro Ro ever worked on purely for great times, atmosphere and crew , would be Shepperton Ferry, Maid of Kent and the NF Tiger.
I am probably biased however I always enjoyed the Railway boats, each port around the UK had their Classics, however like Cambria often wonder what the thinking was behind some of the construction of ships in the mid sixties by BR. When the SS Dover and the Holyhead Ferry 1 were built they entered service as steam ships, no bow doors low cardecks, so only a few high vehicles could be reversed into the stern area. They were not pretty to look at however worked on both and had an enjoyable time, accomadation standards were very high, however well out of date when entering service especially when Townsends FE2 and FE3, came about the same time, yes ugly ducklings, but ready to change the whole concept of ferries on the Dover Straights with their drive through cardecks and better freight carrying facilities.
Well thats my five pennieth.
Best Regards
Yuge
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  #59  
Old 2nd February 2007, 09:39
cambria49 cambria49 is offline
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I have been thinking about this thread and have come to the conclusion that I can't possibly comment. For what is considered as best design?

Looks?
Sea Keeping (compared with similar vessels)?
Efficiency?
Ability to do the job asked of her?
Popularity with passengers?
Length of career?

And of course, do we talk of "all time"?

But, we can of course discuss some of the old friends mentioned here.

Now Yuge mentions the Holyhead Ferry 1 and Dover, two ships I recall from my childhood and also two ships which feature on my own web site; both in picture and in memory of various former Masters and Officers.

These two are the perfect example of poorly designed ships of the day.

Yuge hits the nail firmly on the head; steam turbines, stern loading, low headroom on the car deck and add to that the fact that they did not have bridge control - electric telegraphs being the order of the day.

The HF1 ended her days in a Spanish scrap yard in 1981, while the Dover ended up static use as a floating nightclub. Today she is idle at Hartlepool.

Now, consider that one year before the Holyhead Ferry 1 and the Dover two new ships entered service at Southampton. The Viking I and Viking II of Thoresen Car Ferries were following in 1965 by the Viking III. All three enjoyed bow and stern loading, ample headroom for trucks, diesel propulsion and also bridge control of the main engines.

Suffice to say, all three ships are still around today. The Viking II became Sealink's well known Earl William and today survives in Trinidad & Tobago. The other two are each in Greece and Norway.

Certainly contenders for superb design.
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  #60  
Old 2nd February 2007, 12:09
PeterG PeterG is offline  
 
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My criteria when I started this thread were that the ship has to be in active service today, and I was talking merely about LOOKS - regardless of reliability and operation.
Basically, which of today's ferries looks the most attractive?
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  #61  
Old 2nd February 2007, 12:37
jimmys jimmys is offline  
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Hi Peter
Everyone " looks " at things differently and an attraction to one could repel another.
What attracts engineers is good design, looks are immaterial.
Thats why the thread diverts

best regards
jimmys
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  #62  
Old 2nd February 2007, 12:59
cambria49 cambria49 is offline
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I concur with Jimmy, beauty is indeed in the eye of the beholder!

Whether a ferry looks good or not has little to do with design. Rather, good design should be measured against the vessel's success at the job for which she was created.

But, for looks, I do like the Stena Adventurer - inside and out!
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  #63  
Old 2nd February 2007, 21:50
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Having been all over the Stena Adventurer, I have to say that she is a good looking ship, however, I still stand by what I said earlier, that the ferry which "floats my boat" is definately the Ulysses. As for the St David??????????? Come on, Cambers, what are you thinking about? She had no shape whatsoever, she was just a box with funells! I think that there was only you and Scottie who liked her. (The previous St David however.............!)
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  #64  
Old 3rd February 2007, 03:17
cambria49 cambria49 is offline
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Ah but Coastie, with the St David I wasn't thinking about looks, rather her design as a ferry - her functionality. That she is still serving the Irish Sea today is testiment to that design.

She was a terrific ship to load; could carry a huge amount of fright (for the time), was easy to turnround and was highly manoeuverable.

A double decker that was required to operate to ports not equipped with double deck linkspans, she had an ingenious internal ramp system; the whole upper deck being moveable and hinged amidships. To deliver an acceptable ramp gradient both upper and main vehicle decks were slightly raised forward and aft, but sloped away to midships; thus the required ramp gradient was achieved, the ramp being hinged at the low point of the upper deck and meeting the high point of the main vehicle deck forward or aft.

If you look at a photo of the ship, following the belting and also the cabin windows and you will see the slope.

So no, not a particularly good looking ship - but a bloody great design!
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  #65  
Old 3rd February 2007, 03:49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cambria49 View Post
Ah but Coastie, with the St David I wasn't thinking about looks, rather her design as a ferry - her functionality. That she is still serving the Irish Sea today is testiment to that design.
I take your point about her still serving the Irish Sea as opposed to the Columba which was sold on and possibly from an operators point of view she was ideal, but not very pleasing to the eye!
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  #66  
Old 3rd February 2007, 08:29
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Actually Coastie (and with apologies for slight topic change), former St Columba handed over to new Owners yesterday; more details on my forum.
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  #67  
Old 4th February 2007, 12:45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Carson View Post
Based on visual and sentimental values, not cold hard efficiency and convenience:
Lake Michigan Carferry's coal fired steamship 'Badger' built in 1952. Runs across the Lake in the summer season between Ludington, Michigan and Manitowac, Wisconsin carrying passengers and automobiles.

http://www.greatlakesdigitalimaging.com/badger01.jpg

(Her inactive sistership, 'Spartan', is in the background)

Bruce C
Ugly as sin ! I have seen her close up...

By Looks I'd vote for one of the scandinavian ferries
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  #68  
Old 25th March 2007, 03:42
Shaun_Donnelly Shaun_Donnelly is offline  
 
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Aesthetically speaking, I would say the Princess Marie Esmeralda and P M Christine before they was bastardised. Meaty ships, built as Belgian navy reserves and capable of 30 knots, although in ferry service they was governed to 20ish.

The Ostend ships were reknowned for their astern propulsion, which didn't seem to be governed at all. I often witnessed them swinging outside of Dover harbour and running astern at 20 knots (quite phenomenal) towards the pier heads.

Stena Emperor was a mighty fine looking vessel, latterly the Pride Of Provence, she had all the lines of a classic cruise liner but her downfall was her power. Dover/Calais vessels rely heavily on power to maintain their hectic schedules and Emperor/Provence was woefully retarded in this area. A beautiful ship though nevertheless!

Shaun
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  #69  
Old 30th March 2007, 12:34
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Considering that most ferries are built for a particular route or line, I think, as an all round design, and for what was a truely multi-purpose design, the Vortigern of 1969 might be the best. She could fit into any of the Dover/Folkestone services - car ferry, passenger ferry (train connections at Boulogne), and train ferry to Dunkirk, and for her era, had as good a payload as any of the ferries. Chartres, her close sister comes second - the "back-to-front" funnel was wonderful, but Saint Eloi lacked the bow door that the other two had.

I agree with Justin that the St. Anselm etc were (and still are) superb carriers - again considering the context for which they were built, they must have the best and most versitile vehicle deck design ever, but were from the next era...and couldn't carry trains!

Fred
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  #70  
Old 30th March 2007, 14:12
Locking Splice Locking Splice is offline  
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Hi Fred,

Would agree with you very much on the Vortigerns design, sadly however their were a few problems that first year.
I joined her brand new in 1969 and when we entered service British Railways were still using the old number 2 berth, so once the the main car decks and mezzene decks were full, you had to wait while the shore ramp was raised to be able to load the top garage unlike Townsends who could load both decks at the same time over on number 4 berth. At the end of the summer season we changed too the Train Ferry service. however their was a problem on the Train Deck (I forget what the problem was now, think it was to do with Sprinklers or Fire curtains. The Board of Trade refused to allow the ship to run on the service it was origanly intended for the (Night Ferry Wagon Lits London to Paris Sleeping car service) this brand new lady was put on the the dreaded Ghost run, a cinderella service for the rest of the winter. Carrying mostly empty railway wagons, while the old 30's built Shepperton Ferry and Twickenham Ferry and 1950s' built St Germain shared the regular time tabled runs and Sleeper Service.
The origanal Ghost Run on the Hampton and Shepperton were very popular as their was only one crew and you lived aboard the ship and good money could be earnt. However the Vortigan had three crews and on the 12 hours on 24 hour off system which meant you had to join at 0430 in the mornings (not very popular).
The Railways had some funny ways, and even though the Vortigern was the newest ship the lovely old SS Invicta on the Golden Arrow Service remained the Commodore ship for a few more years after.
As a crew member who served in many of the older Steamers she never really captured the great atmosphere that the old Railway Boats were noted for. That said, she was not a bad ship to work on and the Railways certinaly got their moneys worth out of the old Vortigern and with her they tried to catch up with Townsends albeit very slowly.

Best Regards

Yuge
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  #71  
Old 30th March 2007, 20:12
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Very nice for my opinion Was LEOPARDI of 70s. seen at Genoa 1986- and LA SUPERBA 2002.i was on her in 2002 ,here at Barcelona 2002.
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  #72  
Old 30th March 2007, 20:18
rstimaru rstimaru is offline  
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Northsea ferries gets my vote.The second would be Cal Mac
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  #73  
Old 7th April 2007, 05:30
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Locking Splice.

From reading your last entry, am I correct in thinking that you worked aboard the Hampton Ferry? I thought she was a great ship and often looked at her when she was up here on lay-up. (I was about 8) I've got a couple of photos of her somewhere in the outer harbour here, when I find them, I'll post them in the gallery.
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  #74  
Old 7th April 2007, 10:51
Locking Splice Locking Splice is offline  
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Hampton Ferry

Hi Coastie,

Yes I sailed in the Hampton a couple of times. They were good old Ships however the Shepperton was my favourite. I joined her as a Deck Boy in 1967 she was over 30 years old when I joined her however she had a lot of character and a proud war record. Entering and Departing port my job was up on the Bridge wing working the Engine Room Telegraphs. Sometimes you could be up their hours when the weather was bad especially trying to lock in at Dunkerque. I' ll never forget those old Chadburn Telegrapths, trying to hear the Caprtains orders and the reply bells ringing from the engine room above the howl of the wind. Because we lost an Anchor up in the Downs much of that summer was spent on the Ghost Run fitting in between the service ships during the middle of the night. This was very popular with the lads as we became a one crew ship and plenty of overtime. Our layby berth was out on number 5 berth on the Admirality Pier, now the site of one the Cruise Terminal berths.
They were hard working ships and had good crews. Although many had been in her for some years, they had also served in Cable Ships, Salvage Tugs, Royal Navy, and Deep Sea, before finding their fiddlers green. Many had seen War Service.
We lived under the Train Deck right foward, and although the accomadation was sparten she was still cosy and comftable.
The smell of steam and oil was everywhere (beutiful) all the mooring gear was steam, she had capstans evervywhere, 4 on the Train Deck ( 2 foward 2 aft) 2 on the foc'sle, 2 on the top mooring deck aft.
As you know she was twin funnelled, and it was my job the polish her whistles, and god help you if they were not gleaming. Captain Bussy was the Master a nice old boy from the old school, he had come up through the hawse pipe to Captain. The Chief Officers I remember were a Mr Mike Bodiam and Mike Bates, and were decent chaps, while waiting in the locks they would often get the compass card out and help and test you for your steering ticket. Mike Forward was Second Mate, I would sail with him many years later when he was Master of the NF Tiger and I Bosun.
My Father after war service with Royal Navy in the Far East, returned home to join the Hampton Ferry in 1946 when she still had the heavy lifting gear fitted over the after end which could lift 84 tons.
Although I served in many ships both Foreign and Home trade, the Shepperton will always stand out as one of my favourites, a good old girl, lots of good memories.

Best Regards

Yuge
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  #75  
Old 25th July 2007, 11:31
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Altho i have limited experience and a bid bias (growing up with calmac) i have to say they have some good looking ships. Its a shme you asked for active ships cos i would have to co with the 1964 trio calmac had Columba (Hebridean princess), Clansman and Hebrides not to mention the Glen Sanox and the Suilven. As for modern ships i would say Caly isles, Loti, Isle of Lewis and my favourite Isle of Mull. Sorry for my my bias.


oh yeah P&O's St Ola quite good lookin too
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