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  #26  
Old 9th July 2017, 08:35
David Campbell David Campbell is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Erimus View Post
They stopped being ship owners in 1997 and Jacobs Holdings took them over....they were then incorporated into Bidcorp Shipping....then 'rebranded' as Dartline at Dartford....this was in 2005 and the following year ceased to trade as ship managers...

geoff
Geoff Thanks for that. Brought out the "Somersby" from H& W Belfastin 1964. Ropners had 2 fine Superintendents there Capt Thompson and Engr. Ed. Cherry. Often thought of them. David.
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  #27  
Old 9th July 2017, 10:07
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Erimus Erimus is offline  
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Geoff Thanks for that. Brought out the "Somersby" from H& W Belfastin 1964. Ropners had 2 fine Superintendents there Capt Thompson and Engr. Ed. Cherry. Often thought of them. David.
Something totally different about Ropners....for some years they owned Hozelock the garden hose and sprinkler outfit....if you went in their Darlington office in the 70's the stuff was all over the place. They sold it,same year as 2 ships I remember.

Geoff
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  #28  
Old 9th July 2017, 12:35
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IAN M IAN M is offline
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Extracted from the Ropner section of my book, Shipping Company Losses of the Second World War.

HAXBY (Captain C. Rundell). Bound for Corpus Christi in Texas, sailed from the Clyde on 8 April, 1940 and joined Convoy OG.25 which formed at sea on the 10th. Dispersed from the Convoy and sailing independently when intercepted and sunk by the German raider Orion (KrvKpt. Kurt Weyher) on the 24th, in position 3130N 5130W. Seventeen died and 24 taken on board the Orion, but, together with other prisoners, transferred to the Norwegian ship Tropic Sea (Captain Henrik Nicolaysen) after she was captured on 18 June. Under a prize crew and heading for Bordeaux, the Tropic Sea was intercepted and scuttled by the submarine HMS Truant (Lt.Cdr. H.A.V. Haggard) on 3 September, in the Bay of Biscay. The Truant carried 25 of the released prisoners to Gibraltar while a Sunderland Flying Boat of Coastal Command rescued some Norwegians. Twenty-one others landed from a lifeboat at Corunna in neutral Spain on the 7th. The prize crew also landed in Spain from where they were repatriated to Germany.
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  #29  
Old 9th July 2017, 23:50
lakercapt lakercapt is offline  
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Ropners

During my time there (1953-1957) the only ships worth sailing on were
Swiftpool
Somerby
Daleby
Deerpool
The ones on the US liner service.
The others were tramping and you did not know when you would get off
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  #30  
Old 10th July 2017, 04:09
David Campbell David Campbell is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Erimus View Post
Something totally different about Ropners....for some years they owned Hozelock the garden hose and sprinkler outfit....if you went in their Darlington office in the 70's the stuff was all over the place. They sold it,same year as 2 ships I remember.

Geoff
Geoff. Ropners brought me over to Darlington in July 1971(H&W annual Holiday) to meet Mr. Church, the Technical Director and to meet a Mr. Ropner, all a bit of a blur, now. I flew from Belfast to Newcastle on Tyne, then got a Train to Darlington. Was impressed by Darlington and the Ropner estate. Ropners was at its best, then. David.

Last edited by David Campbell; 10th July 2017 at 07:44.. Reason: Typo
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  #31  
Old 10th July 2017, 22:42
lakercapt lakercapt is offline  
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Originally Posted by R651400 View Post
Most cargo liner companies as they were known at the time had their own cadet or in the Blue Funnel case midshipman training ship..
I had the pleasure of visiting an old pal on Ropner's Daleby and was amazed at the standard upheld by this fine looking ship (and company) on what was generally recognised as a common all garden tramp company..
When did the Daleby become a Cadetship??? Ropners during my tenure only had apprentices. They must have used the passenger quarters. Changed their outlook about them too as apprentices were cheap overworked labour when I was there. The Daleby was the last trip I did as apprentice and the only time we ate in the officers dining room.15th May 1956 until 12th July 1996
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  #32  
Old 25th October 2017, 16:08
cyp greeky cyp greeky is offline  
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thirlby 4 / stonepool

sailed on these twoships nice co looked after their officers ships bit rough but good times had by all wife sailed with me usa-oddessawish they were still about for the next generation of sailors mick the greek
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  #33  
Old 25th October 2017, 16:30
cyp greeky cyp greeky is offline  
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thirlby 4 / stonepool

sailed on these twoships nice co looked after their officers ships bit rough but good times had by all wife sailed with me usa-oddessawish they were still about for the next generation of sailors mick the greek
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  #34  
Old 25th October 2017, 19:45
FOUFOU FOUFOU is offline  
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Sailed Willowpool 64 Liverpool / Canada for grain back to Liverpool. Good crew and food, tidy ship. have a photo up the St Lawrence must try and find it.
regards to all.
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  #35  
Old 8th February 2019, 09:32
Anthony.Harrison Anthony.Harrison is offline
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Hi there,

I am sure I may know him from the M.V. Romanby.

If I remember right he was from Hartlepool 3rd officer. there were 3 of us which seemed to get on well, Kevin, Taffy ( radio operator ) and myself Junior engineer. I have got pictures of us all having a great time in Hong Kong ( Repulse Bay ). If you want a copy let me know.
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  #36  
Old 8th February 2019, 11:57
seaman38 seaman38 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lakercapt View Post
The Daleby was the last trip I did as apprentice and the only time we ate in the officers dining room.15th May 1956 until 12th July 1996
I know that Ropner's did long trips (my longest 22 months) but yours certainly beat mine, also one hell of an apprenticeship.

Having served my time with PSNC I found Ropner's a breath of fresh air and the owners always treated me fairly, if they asked me to wait for a ship they always paid me standby pay. Like most companies a bad trip experienced as a first trip tainted your opinion of the company and you probably left after that first trip. Fortunately my first experience of Ropners was with Captain Churchill on the 'Swiftpool' and he was a thorough gentleman to all on board, only a short coastal voyage. I sailed with Captain Dixon also a gentleman, but somehow different. Sailed with Captain Carter on 'Levenpool' for three trips again a gentleman and willing to pass on his vast experience, as were the others. On the fourth voyage he was replaced by another master, whose name I will not disclose, as he has living son in the MN and may look in here, he was the complete opposite to the other three masters sailed with, a complete tartar and nobody was ever right, the three OOW could get our noon position within the same cocked hat and he would be 10 or more (a lot more) miles adrift, but his position had to go on the chart. The food changed (had been good) overtime for crew stopped (had been good), even stopping crews mail being sent if they didn't have sufficient money in their account, because any overtime they did have wasn't taken into account, I paid for many a crew mates mail. Anyone who sailed on that trip would have gained a terrible impression of the company. All persons on board except the C/E left the vessel upon arriving the UK, I was told by the master that I would never on his recommendation get another job in the company. Fortunately Capt Churchill asked for me and we sailed away for 22 months on a well fed and happy ship, we only had one bad apple, but he picked a fight with some Japanese fisherman whilst ashore, bad move, very bad move, he ended up in hospital requiring more than 200 stitches. The Police had collected me from the vessel took me to the hospital whilst I watched him being stitched up, even though he was a bad apple and bully I did feel sorry for him, no pain killers or anesthetics, doctors advised me that it would not be good for him, but perhaps they were friends of the fisherman!! He had to be flown home and he was not missed.

I enjoyed my time tramping, visiting parts of the world that Liner type companies would never visit, in my time at sea Liner companies seemed to have a dead man's shoes approach to promotion, but fortunately we are not all the same and some got comfort of the predictability of a liner trade but had never sailed through the Panama Canal, an experience well worth having, Never did get to feed the mules though
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  #37  
Old 8th February 2019, 17:55
kudu kudu is offline  
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Hello Anthony. Yes kevin left the sea in 1971,and joined Hartlepool police.The last time I saw him was about 1975,and he was still in the police,but thinking about joining the harbour police.I saw his sister shortly after,but never saw Kevin or his family again. He told me he enjoyed Hong Kong.
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  #38  
Old 8th February 2019, 18:45
lakercapt lakercapt is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seaman38 View Post
I know that Ropner's did long trips (my longest 22 months) but yours certainly beat mine, also one hell of an apprenticeship.

. Like most companies a bad trip experienced as a first trip tainted your opinion of the company and you probably left after that first trip.

On the fourth voyage he was replaced by another master, whose name I will not disclose, as he has living son in the MN and may look in here, he was the complete opposite to the other three masters sailed with, a complete tartar and nobody was ever right, the three OOW could get our noon position within the same cocked hat and he would be 10 or more (a lot more) miles adrift, but his position had to go on the chart. The food changed (had been good) overtime for crew stopped (had been good), even stopping crews mail being sent if they didn't have sufficient money in their account, because any overtime they did have wasn't taken into account, I paid for many a crew mates mail. Anyone who sailed on that trip would have gained a terrible impression of the company. All persons on board except the C/E left the vessel upon arriving the UK, I was told by the master that I would never on his recommendation get another job in the company.

I enjoyed my time tramping, visiting parts of the world that Liner type companies would never visit, in my time at sea Liner companies seemed to have a dead man's shoes approach to promotion, but fortunately we are not all the same and some got comfort of the predictability of a liner trade but had never sailed through the Panama Canal, an experience well worth having, Never did get to feed the mules though
II did finish my time and obtained my 2nd mates. Foolishly thought as you it might be better as II was promised many changes and sailed on the "Romanby" on its maiden voyage for eight months as the third mate. I think the same captain you mention was the a88h8le we had. Taking sights and his was the only position considered even though I knew they were erroneous (I took his sextant out the box and stood on the frame so there s no way it was accurate. The Radar was locked up. I almost had fisty cuffs with him and it was only the sparkie who saved the day.
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  #39  
Old 9th August 2019, 00:00
Josephh Josephh is offline
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Hi I sailed with Ropners in the 80s. Did a cadetship at shields and joined my first ship in Port Talbot.
I had the trip from hell. The chief engineer was not. The third engineer was a professional third who was knocked back from second. The fourth engineer was a lazy useless vicious piece of work.
They were all from Tyne side and the second engineer and myself as cadet were not. They hated Ken Dixie and I could not do a thing right .. if he told me to do it .. it was wrong.
I had seven months of hell. Dobbie kept the overtime bill down by making me do it.
I made it through seven and a half months and just needed six weeks to complete my sea time.
Next trip I met professionals. I stayed for five years.
I often think about the t oss ers I had first trip and how they nearly ruined my life due their own failures of both professionalism and basic humanitarianism. They were basically just nasty pieces of sh 1 t.
I read earlier about joe bell. Saved my life many times on that trip with a few kind words and a cream horn. Nice guy. Great baker. Gregs of Gosforth I seem to remember.
I left in 87. Just been on a reunion with 20 guys from SSMTC.
I made lifetime friends and had experiences I still remember and reflect on. But most of that first trip I would rather forget.
On a positive note, it taught me how not to treat people and if I ever think about being that ... evil is about the best word ... then I think back to what they did to me and choose another path.
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  #40  
Old 9th August 2019, 12:20
lakercapt lakercapt is offline  
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This thread about "Ropners" still being active I wonder if there is anyone that sailed on the "Aussie" coast for them doing the iron ore and coal trade?? Two years was the stretch!!!
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  #41  
Old 31st August 2019, 08:30
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jimd jimd is offline  
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I sailed as an engineer with ropners in the early eighties for nearly five years. For the most the engineers I sailed with were a good crowd. Some of the names mentioned certainly ring a bell. Some good memories.
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  #42  
Old 31st August 2019, 12:24
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norm.h norm.h is offline  
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Towards the end of May 1959 I went back to the Pool, and was sent to Avonmouth as a relief junior engineer on the Rushpool.
I must have made an impression on the Chief, because when it was time for me to leave he gave me a glowing reference and said he would be pleased to have me on his staff any time. He suggested I contact Ropner's head office for a permanent position. I took his advice and was offered a job as a Junior Engineer on the Thornaby.
She had a five-cylinder Doxford, with electric and steam driven auxiliaries.
My first trip to the Gulf was uneventful, and we docked in Sunderland, where I rejoined her as Fourth Engineer, for a trip to the Gulf and Canada.

An embarrassing incident
We were preparing to restore power from our own steam-driven generators.
To raise steam, the fuel-oil and boiler water pumps were run connected to the shipyard's compressed air system. Once we had sufficient steam pressure the pumps were changed over to steam and the compressed air disconnected. The plan was to start our generators and disconnect shore power at 9am.

I was duty engineer and was woken at 6am by a very sleepy but embarrassed donkeyman telling me we'd lost boiler pressure. He'd fallen asleep (whether deliberately or accidentally I never discovered) and the pressure had decayed until the pumps stopped.
Since the shoreside compressors were also shut down at that hour, we had no way of getting things going again, and I had to meet the Chief as he came on board to tell him before anyone else did. He'd already guessed something was amiss as he couldn't see any steam vapour or smoke coming from the funnel! The donkeyman was reprimanded and I got off scott-free.

The best part of that trip was leaving Montreal. I was in the boiler room when I had a visit from Sparks, who presented me with a telegram saying that my daughter had been born on November 9th.
Then it was "Land's End for orders". We were sent to one of the ports at the mouth of the River Elbe, and from there to Weymouth where some of us left just in time for Christmas.
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