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  #51  
Old 30th November 2014, 15:30
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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I can`t recall trhe 4/e`s name but he was a Scot,guitar playing decent bloke.I never did any shoreside training but was shown how to give injections,suture and administer first aid by successive competent Clan Line Pursers.My last 4 years were spent with Whitco and I was lucky in that nothing truly appalling ever happened whilst we were at sea but we have the embarrassment of a R/O`s missus bowels packing up.She hadn`t taken a **** for weeks before she summoned up the courage to visit me,by then she was in pain and must have been stinking the cabin out.I gave her some laxatives but no chance so we contacted the Red Cross in Geneva who sent a questionnaire to be filled in,by radio,so there we were in the Sparkies cabin as she lay in bed having her hand held by Sparks as the Captain and I asked all the hundreds of questions they needed answering. The OM asked`When did you last have a bowel movement``What does he mean?`she plaintively asked her husband`Oh come on woman when did you last empty your bowels?`we strugggled through this interrogation and awaited a reply.Happily before we had to divert she managed to go,she must have filled the bowl.
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  #52  
Old 30th November 2014, 17:12
George Bis George Bis is offline
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Originally Posted by alan ward View Post
I can`t recall trhe 4/e`s name but he was a Scot,guitar playing decent bloke.I never did any shoreside training but was shown how to give injections,suture and administer first aid by successive competent Clan Line Pursers.My last 4 years were spent with Whitco and I was lucky in that nothing truly appalling ever happened whilst we were at sea but we have the embarrassment of a R/O`s missus bowels packing up.She hadn`t taken a **** for weeks before she summoned up the courage to visit me,by then she was in pain and must have been stinking the cabin out.I gave her some laxatives but no chance so we contacted the Red Cross in Geneva who sent a questionnaire to be filled in,by radio,so there we were in the Sparkies cabin as she lay in bed having her hand held by Sparks as the Captain and I asked all the hundreds of questions they needed answering. The OM asked`When did you last have a bowel movement``What does he mean?`she plaintively asked her husband`Oh come on woman when did you last empty your bowels?`we strugggled through this interrogation and awaited a reply.Happily before we had to divert she managed to go,she must have filled the bowl.
What happened to "Black Draft"! That solved the stubbornness cases.
When I was with Denholms I sailed with an Indian crew on one ship and although they were an excellent crew in many ways I have never known so many illnesses clamed. I think the Chief Steward dispensed smarties on various occasions and at each port there was a long list for the Doctor.
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  #53  
Old 1st December 2014, 12:27
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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We weren`t carrying`Black draught`by then,it was far more civilised.Regarding foreign crews and their constant desire to see a doctor.An old Clan Line Purser Jimmy`Mother Harper`had a logical explanation for it.He believed it was to stockpile prescription medication for their families back home.Seems logical and understandable,if they were charged when at home and they knew what was what,why not? I once watched the baggage being winched ashore during a crew change on the Clan McLeod in Birkenhead,the cargo net landed hard on the quay and as it was lifted clear the ghee was running out of someone case,they obviously regarded shipping home a relatively small amount of hoarded cooking oil worthwhile so just how poor were they?
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  #54  
Old 2nd December 2014, 12:49
George Bis George Bis is offline
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Originally Posted by alan ward View Post
We weren`t carrying`Black draught`by then,it was far more civilised.Regarding foreign crews and their constant desire to see a doctor.An old Clan Line Purser Jimmy`Mother Harper`had a logical explanation for it.He believed it was to stockpile prescription medication for their families back home.Seems logical and understandable,if they were charged when at home and they knew what was what,why not? I once watched the baggage being winched ashore during a crew change on the Clan McLeod in Birkenhead,the cargo net landed hard on the quay and as it was lifted clear the ghee was running out of someone case,they obviously regarded shipping home a relatively small amount of hoarded cooking oil worthwhile so just how poor were they?
The Indian crew I sailed with paid about 1/3 of British wages at the time and I am sure that you are right about stockpiling medications.
The Serang's nephew had to be paid off with medical problems and a drum of silver paint was found in his cabin. All in all though I enjoyed sailing with them and learned a few words of the language. Hindi I think. Strangely seven years later in Iraq I found that I could recognise some of the words the docker's were using (not English) I would welcome information on this
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  #55  
Old 2nd December 2014, 14:43
Leratty Leratty is offline  
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George, I must be missing something possibly you could explain what "paid off with medical problems and a drum of silver paint was found in his cabin. " Is it being said or implied it was there due to his illness or was it as we used to say being 'borrowed' & he could not due to his illness take it with him?

I have been surprised at learning form the site T&L utilised sub continental crews as when I sailed on the Sugar Exporter it was an all UK crew except for me the one colonial.

My two trips were short but fun the W.I's & Holland. I shall never forget the crew walking the decks one morning with signs stating We want Heinz baked beans." not generic that we were getting at breakfast.

Oh we did not have mud pilots on the wheel when leaving T&L's wharf, yes a Thames pilot. In fact I was on the wheel as we left late one night light ship that is a story I have mentioned before on SN a very funny incident due to over indulgence at the local we used to use.

Last edited by Leratty; 2nd December 2014 at 14:51..
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  #56  
Old 2nd December 2014, 16:39
George Bis George Bis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leratty View Post
George, I must be missing something possibly you could explain what "paid off with medical problems and a drum of silver paint was found in his cabin. " Is it being said or implied it was there due to his illness or was it as we used to say being 'borrowed' & he could not due to his illness take it with him?

I have been surprised at learning form the site T&L utilised sub continental crews as when I sailed on the Sugar Exporter it was an all UK crew except for me the one colonial.

My two trips were short but fun the W.I's & Holland. I shall never forget the crew walking the decks one morning with signs stating We want Heinz baked beans." not generic that we were getting at breakfast.

Oh we did not have mud pilots on the wheel when leaving T&L's wharf, yes a Thames pilot. In fact I was on the wheel as we left late one night light ship that is a story I have mentioned before on SN a very funny incident due to over indulgence at the local we used to use.
Sorry to be obscure. The Indian crew I sailed with was on a Denholms tanker and the Serangs nephew was paid off with kidney problems. The drum of paint was found after he had gone.
T & L did occasionally use Rotterdam International Pool crews(the Exporter had a Cape Verde deck crew when I was on her) but that was unusual.
You mentioning "locals" brings back memories. Can you remember which one it was!
Cant remember exactly how Ron Butcher, the Mud Pilot operated but he certainly did some steering
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  #57  
Old 5th December 2014, 06:50
DURANGO DURANGO is offline  
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Originally Posted by french47 View Post
Hi George, we played football on an estate of flats, It was a hard game and I don't remember who won. When we left we got bricks and bottles thrown at us. Also half the ships crew went down with gippo guts due to shore made ice that we had used to cool beer cans.
i spent a month in hospital back in 1962 due to shore made ice I avoid it all ice in drinks since then
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  #58  
Old 5th December 2014, 10:04
George Bis George Bis is offline
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Originally Posted by DURANGO View Post
i spent a month in hospital back in 1962 due to shore made ice I avoid it all ice in drinks since then
Very wise!
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  #59  
Old 5th December 2014, 13:19
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Our deck and catering crowd on the Crystal was London apart from a Geordie cook Brian,they were mainly from Essex the engine room lads were all Aden arabs.One of them came to me after crushing his thumb it looked like a sausage someone had stamped on truly messed up.Luckily we were due in port shortly so I cleaned it up and bandaged it tightly praying I hadn`t damaged it further.A couple of years later I joined the Labrador Clipper in Balboa and on entering the crew mess I saw the same guy sitting at a table.He saw me,gave a big grin and a thumbs up with the scarred but thankfully intact digit.
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  #60  
Old 5th December 2014, 18:59
chadburn chadburn is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DURANGO View Post
i spent a month in hospital back in 1962 due to shore made ice I avoid it all ice in drinks since then
Also keep away from the salted peanuts and the unwrapped Mints on the Bar
__________________
Geordie Chief

From Grey Funnel to any Funnel, just show him/ me the money Mabel
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  #61  
Old 6th December 2014, 11:24
George Bis George Bis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alan ward View Post
Our deck and catering crowd on the Crystal was London apart from a Geordie cook Brian,they were mainly from Essex the engine room lads were all Aden arabs.One of them came to me after crushing his thumb it looked like a sausage someone had stamped on truly messed up.Luckily we were due in port shortly so I cleaned it up and bandaged it tightly praying I hadn`t damaged it further.A couple of years later I joined the Labrador Clipper in Balboa and on entering the crew mess I saw the same guy sitting at a table.He saw me,gave a big grin and a thumbs up with the scarred but thankfully intact digit.
Apart from one voyage on the "Exporter" with Sugar Line the deck and catering crowd were all from London or if we had been to Shields for dry- dock Newcastle.
You seem to have real medical skills. Glad the thumb healed!
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  #62  
Old 6th December 2014, 13:03
Locking Splice Locking Splice is offline  
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Am sure it was Mr Butcher coming aboard the Sugar Refiner off Gravesend and relieving me on the wheel for the run up to Silvertown and me being sent to help the other Seaman opening the lids ready for the grabs to start lightning her up as soon as we got along side. That was in 78, he was very cheerful and cracked a joke with me as he took the helm, seemed to be getting on in age then.
Took another cargo of Sugar up to Silvertown later that year on the drilling ship Whitethorn, ( we had reverted back to cargo carrying and the Drill gear removed ) but cannot remember him coming out to take her in, probably because she was a lot smaller at 1,513 tonnes.

Regards

Yuge
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  #63  
Old 6th December 2014, 15:51
George Bis George Bis is offline
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Originally Posted by Locking Splice View Post
Am sure it was Mr Butcher coming aboard the Sugar Refiner off Gravesend and relieving me on the wheel for the run up to Silvertown and me being sent to help the other Seaman opening the lids ready for the grabs to start lightning her up as soon as we got along side. That was in 78, he was very cheerful and cracked a joke with me as he took the helm, seemed to be getting on in age then.
Took another cargo of Sugar up to Silvertown later that year on the drilling ship Whitethorn, ( we had reverted back to cargo carrying and the Drill gear removed ) but cannot remember him coming out to take her in, probably because she was a lot smaller at 1,513 tonnes.

Regards

Yuge
That is how I remember things being done and he was a likable man. I never knew why that was the system on the Thames i.e. Mud Pilot, and nowhere else? Comments welcome!
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  #64  
Old 8th December 2014, 11:14
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Regarding medical skills I was reminded of a certain ED`s Chief Steward who shall remain nameless as he was exceptionally violent.We had a Sierra Leonian AB who`d picked some anti social disease on our time round the UK coast and were reporting to him every morning for their 250,00 units of penicillin.The C/S had been drinking gin heavily the night before and had a bad case of the shakes.He managed to get the distilled water ampoule opened,get it into the powdered penicillin and syphoned up into the syringe.The AB lowered his pants and the C/S swiped a surgical spirit swab over the chosen site of injection and then froze,his hand was shaking that much he couldn`t possibly complete the process,he tried once,twice and as he failed for the third time smartly slapped the AB`s ****,squirted the solution into the air and said`that`s you done`
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  #65  
Old 8th December 2014, 12:44
WilliamH WilliamH is offline  
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ED chief stewards, I remember an accident alongside Appa quay. While warping up the quay some crew boys were thrown over the drum end of the windlass, the Chief Steward attended the scene, the injuries were minor except for one, the Chief Steward reported to the Captain who was standing at the bar as follows, " three minor injuries , one has got a broken arm, but I'm sure he had that when he joined in Freetown", so no comeback on the Company.
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  #66  
Old 8th December 2014, 13:28
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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We had a bosun trapped between a ventilator and a derrick on the Owerri mada a right mess of his ribs,luckily we were alongside and he was taken ashore immediately,he didn`t rejoin before sailing though.
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  #67  
Old 9th December 2014, 11:22
George Bis George Bis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alan ward View Post
Regarding medical skills I was reminded of a certain ED`s Chief Steward who shall remain nameless as he was exceptionally violent.We had a Sierra Leonian AB who`d picked some anti social disease on our time round the UK coast and were reporting to him every morning for their 250,00 units of penicillin.The C/S had been drinking gin heavily the night before and had a bad case of the shakes.He managed to get the distilled water ampoule opened,get it into the powdered penicillin and syphoned up into the syringe.The AB lowered his pants and the C/S swiped a surgical spirit swab over the chosen site of injection and then froze,his hand was shaking that much he couldn`t possibly complete the process,he tried once,twice and as he failed for the third time smartly slapped the AB`s ****,squirted the solution into the air and said`that`s you done`
I sailed with a Chief Mate(not Sugar Line) who appointed himself the ships "medical expert" He wasn't bad at it but was obsessed with the idea that everyone who called for his services was suffering from an anti social disease no matter what else they complained off. When calling on him with an injured thumb he treated it and then told me "now drop them" It took some time to convince him that the thumb(which was most painful) was really all I was suffering from.
For what it is worth that company had a policy of "volunteering " some of the senior deck officers and C/S's and A & E hospitals.
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  #68  
Old 10th December 2014, 10:39
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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One of my favourite medical stories was the enema a Chief Officer once administered to an horrible Hartlepool bosun who hadn`t emptied his bowels for weeks.He,the Chief Officer,got splattered with the results and appeared at the saloon door wailing`It`s my birthday`.What a way to celebrate,sticking a tube up some fellers a**e and pumping gallons of warm soapy water down a funnel.
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  #69  
Old 10th December 2014, 11:11
George Bis George Bis is offline
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Originally Posted by alan ward View Post
One of my favourite medical stories was the enema a Chief Officer once administered to an horrible Hartlepool bosun who hadn`t emptied his bowels for weeks.He,the Chief Officer,got splattered with the results and appeared at the saloon door wailing`It`s my birthday`.What a way to celebrate,sticking a tube up some fellers a**e and pumping gallons of warm soapy water down a funnel.
Changing the subject slightly it is funny/pleasant telling these stories so long after we all left the M.N. I am talking about things that I have not thought about in years. Somehow as soon as you stepped off that gangway (or on to it) you went from one world to another and very few people ashore showed any interest in my shipping life. Up S.N.!
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  #70  
Old 11th December 2014, 00:34
Stewart J.'s Avatar
Stewart J. Stewart J. is offline  
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Good evening all, haven't checked out this site since retiring over 2 years ago and was pleasantly surprised to see this thread.

I joined Sugar Line in South Shields as a lowly Junior engineer aged 21 in August 1970 joining MV Crystal Sapphire in South Shields, a baptism by fire as I recall. Offered a contact after some months and stayed till September 1979 when I was made redundant on the sale of one of their last vessels. (We were flown home from Bilbao)

Vessels served on, Crystal Sapphire, Sugar Importer, Crystal Diamond, Sugar Refiner, Sugar Transporter, Sugar Carrier, Sugar Exporter, Sugar Crystal and Sugar Trader.

A long time ago.
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  #71  
Old 11th December 2014, 06:22
Desbee Desbee is offline  
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Hi all! I have just joined this forum, and am enjoying seeing all your post. I was an AB on Exporter in '61. On the first run I joined in Antwerp where she was in dry dock having gear box repairs. After 3 weeks we sailed but broke down in the Channel and were towed into Falmouth, and eventually left for Cuba. The next trip was to Dominican Republic, and my last was to Gdynia in Poland to pick up sugar that had been sent across Russia by train! I think the Captain was a German by the name of Muller. The Mate had broken his back falling into a hold sometime, and was permanently bent right over. We used to say if he ever fell over he would rock himself to sleep trying to get up! I can say that now as he must be long gone by now as it's over 50 years ago. I would love to hear from anyone left who was on it in those days.
Des
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  #72  
Old 13th December 2014, 11:24
George Bis George Bis is offline
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[QUOTE=Stewart J.;1176058]Good evening all, haven't checked out this site since retiring over 2 years ago and was pleasantly surprised to see this thread.

I joined Sugar Line in South Shields as a lowly Junior engineer aged 21 in August 1970 joining MV Crystal Sapphire in South Shields, a baptism by fire as I recall. Offered a contact after some months and stayed till September 1979 when I was made redundant on the sale of one of their last vessels. (We were flown home from Bilbao)

Vessels served on, Crystal Sapphire, Sugar Importer, Crystal Diamond, Sugar Refiner, Sugar Transporter, Sugar Carrier, Sugar Exporter, Sugar Crystal and Sugar Trader.

A long time ago.[/QU
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  #73  
Old 13th December 2014, 11:24
George Bis George Bis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stewart J. View Post
Good evening all, haven't checked out this site since retiring over 2 years ago and was pleasantly surprised to see this thread.

I joined Sugar Line in South Shields as a lowly Junior engineer aged 21 in August 1970 joining MV Crystal Sapphire in South Shields, a baptism by fire as I recall. Offered a contact after some months and stayed till September 1979 when I was made redundant on the sale of one of their last vessels. (We were flown home from Bilbao)

Vessels served on, Crystal Sapphire, Sugar Importer, Crystal Diamond, Sugar Refiner, Sugar Transporter, Sugar Carrier, Sugar Exporter, Sugar Crystal and Sugar Trader.

A long time ago.
Welcome friend! Does the name George Bisacre ring a bell as I was
3/M on half the ships you mention! I was with Sugar Line from 1972 until the 1979 finish. R.S.V.P.
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  #74  
Old 13th December 2014, 11:24
George Bis George Bis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stewart J. View Post
Good evening all, haven't checked out this site since retiring over 2 years ago and was pleasantly surprised to see this thread.

I joined Sugar Line in South Shields as a lowly Junior engineer aged 21 in August 1970 joining MV Crystal Sapphire in South Shields, a baptism by fire as I recall. Offered a contact after some months and stayed till September 1979 when I was made redundant on the sale of one of their last vessels. (We were flown home from Bilbao)

Vessels served on, Crystal Sapphire, Sugar Importer, Crystal Diamond, Sugar Refiner, Sugar Transporter, Sugar Carrier, Sugar Exporter, Sugar Crystal and Sugar Trader.

A long time ago.
Welcome friend! Does the name George Bisacre ring a bell as I was
3/M on half the ships you mention! I was with Sugar Line from 1972 until the 1979 finish. R.S.V.P.
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  #75  
Old 13th December 2014, 11:24
George Bis George Bis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stewart J. View Post
Good evening all, haven't checked out this site since retiring over 2 years ago and was pleasantly surprised to see this thread.

I joined Sugar Line in South Shields as a lowly Junior engineer aged 21 in August 1970 joining MV Crystal Sapphire in South Shields, a baptism by fire as I recall. Offered a contact after some months and stayed till September 1979 when I was made redundant on the sale of one of their last vessels. (We were flown home from Bilbao)

Vessels served on, Crystal Sapphire, Sugar Importer, Crystal Diamond, Sugar Refiner, Sugar Transporter, Sugar Carrier, Sugar Exporter, Sugar Crystal and Sugar Trader.

A long time ago.
Welcome friend! Does the name George Bisacre ring a bell as I was
3/M on half the ships you mention! I was with Sugar Line from 1972 until the 1979 finish. R.S.V.P.
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