Power Outlets - Ships Nostalgia
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Power Outlets

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  #1  
Old 12th March 2018, 19:48
Hobo5 Hobo5 is offline
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Power Outlets

Gentlemen,
This maybe a rather strange question but I would very much like to know if there were power outlets in 1930s passenger liners state rooms for the use of men's electric shaver's, ladies hair dryers etc: It appears these products were available at that time, however, I could not find any information in regard of their use on board a ship. Also, the requirement of matching voltages would have been a factor.
I'm sorry if this request is rather odd but if anyone would be able to come up with an answer, I would certainly appreciate it.
(Yes, I did Google!)
BTW: - I love 1900 - 1930s Cargo/Passenger Ships
Thank you,
Regards,
P.N.
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  #2  
Old 12th March 2018, 21:58
oceanmariner oceanmariner is offline  
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It depends. New luxury liners had power in 1st class. But older ships and coastal rarely did. Only in bigger cities was power available in homes and apartments. Rural people still used oil lamps and coal stoves. Many ships had separate bathing facilities. Only a sink in the stateroom and maybe not that. Some of the older ships had a bucket under the sink - no in the room plumbing. Coastal passenger liners rarely had bathing facilities, consider the times. It was thought passengers would suffer no hardship going a few days without a bath.
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  #3  
Old 12th March 2018, 23:37
forthbridge forthbridge is offline  
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Other thing is that probably ships power supplies were DC around that time and well into the sixties while the type of products you talk about were acACIt may be on the newer passenger ships that an alternator would be connected for such services but main power generation would be DC due to the type of equipment aailable at that time
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Old 13th March 2018, 00:32
oceanmariner oceanmariner is offline  
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I forgot about the DC. Almost everything WWII built and before was DC. Some had motor generators that made AC. I had a diesel electric tug that was all 250v DC in the 1980s except for a small inverter for AC. Even the reefer was DC. The two generators were DC, too. But had 12v alternators for the wheel house electronics.
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  #5  
Old 13th March 2018, 01:38
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kewl dude kewl dude is offline  
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My Dad had a dense very fast growing beard. Needing to shave at least twice if not three times a day Dad was an early user of electric razors. I recall growing up in the 1940s Dad plugged his razor in the bathroom A/C. When he went aboard ship he plugged the same razor in the DC outlets. I Googled 1930s AC/DC electric razors and found many hits that said they all were ac/dc. As an aside in the late 1960s parts of Brooklyn New York were still DC. I stayed in a Brooklyn hotel that was all DC.

Greg Hayden
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  #6  
Old 13th March 2018, 10:48
Clifford Cocker Clifford Cocker is offline  
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Ship's voltage in the 30s

I should imagine that most vessels were direct current in that era so presumably if one was travelling in the upper classes pampering equipment for the females would have been part of the equipment supplied on the vessel.
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  #7  
Old 13th March 2018, 11:15
Hobo5 Hobo5 is offline
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Hi,
Thank you all for your interesting and informative replies.
Great site and great people!
Regards,
P.N.
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  #8  
Old 13th March 2018, 16:39
TonyAllen TonyAllen is offline  
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OK can some of you leckies out there explain this for me.injapan I bought in 1955 a fender copy guitar and small amp.18 inch by 18 inch .would work on the ship but the chief said it would not work in england.give it to me when I got it back it had a 150 bulb attached to it and a 3 point plug .got home and it worked preferct.but had to make sure the bulb was hanging because of its heat .and sometimes while playing a radio station would cut in.not in English sold it before the next trip .bugged me for years.
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  #9  
Old 13th March 2018, 17:51
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Mad Landsman Mad Landsman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyAllen View Post
OK can some of you leckies out there explain this for me.injapan I bought in 1955 a fender copy guitar and small amp.18 inch by 18 inch .would work on the ship but the chief said it would not work in england.give it to me when I got it back it had a 150 bulb attached to it and a 3 point plug .got home and it worked preferct.but had to make sure the bulb was hanging because of its heat .and sometimes while playing a radio station would cut in.not in English sold it before the next trip .bugged me for years.
That would be voltage rather than AC or DC - (But ACDC, guitars that's something else)
The Amp was probably built for Japan - 100volts, or US -110 volts.
Shipboard voltage was probably 110V.
As the man said; It would not work back in the UK because the 240volts would fry it.

He put the Amplifier in series with a lamp and the voltage was reduced, to both, to an acceptable level.
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  #10  
Old 13th March 2018, 18:07
TonyAllen TonyAllen is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Landsman View Post
That would be voltage rather than AC or DC - (But ACDC, guitars that's something else)
The Amp was probably built for Japan - 100volts, or US -110 volts.
Shipboard voltage was probably 110V.
As the man said; It would not work back in the UK because the 240volts would fry it.

He put the Amplifier in series with a lamp and the voltage was reduced, to both, to an acceptable level.
mind at rest now bugged me for years had an inkling but was never to sure .as putting it in. series thats out of my league. cheers bud tony
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  #11  
Old 13th March 2018, 19:56
John Adamson John Adamson is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clifford Cocker View Post
I should imagine that most vessels were direct current in that era so presumably if one was travelling in the upper classes pampering equipment for the females would have been part of the equipment supplied on the vessel.
I just dug out my copy of the Shipbuilder for the Queen Mary and in describing Staterooms in Cabin Class (1st Class) Quote : - "Other electrical fittings including plugs for heating curling irons"
There is a very detailed diagram of the Electrical Distribution System, and I see no indication of any kind of AC generator, so I guess you had to have a AC/DC switch on your appliance ?
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  #12  
Old 13th March 2018, 20:40
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Ron Stringer Ron Stringer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Adamson View Post
1"Other electrical fittings including plugs for heating curling irons"
Curling irons and flat-irons wouldn't care whether the supply was AC or DC. They would be sensitive to the voltage though.
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