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  #51  
Old 31st December 2008, 09:36
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spongebob spongebob is offline
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It never ceases to amaze me how other posts on this site constantly provoke memories of times and incidents long tucked away in the back of the mind and Rabaulís post no 47 about the Tupperware box of sandwiches reminds me of the meals left out for the 12 to 4 night watch.
I was a fridge engineer on the Rangitane and the arrangement was for a meal to be left in the engineerís pantry fridge for each night watch keeper. This consisted of a couple of rashers of bacon, two eggs and two thick slices of bread for toasting all laid out on a dinner plate and the routine was for the greaser to go up to the pantry to collect it and take it into the main galley to cook it for me around 2 am.
My watch keeping mate was a young Londoner, a Tony Curtis look a-like and suave with it, a nice lad but he was no cook and I was always complaining about hard fried eggs, cindered bacon or burnt toast.
A day or two after we left Panama for Wellington he went up stairs to cook the breakfast but instead of being missing for half an hour almost an hour had elapsed before he came back to surprise me with a meal cooked to perfection. I asked him who cooked it and he insisted that he had and claimed that he had decided to try a little harder. This went on for a week, great meals and piping hot until one morning he arrived back after more than an hour with a plateful of twisted and charred remains of what was once good food. I challenged him to come clean otherwise I would go up and cook my own breakfast from then on and finally he admitted to the fact that the second Baker, a mate of his, who was on deck at that hour baking the bread rolls for the passenger breakfasts, was cooking my bacon and eggs while the greaser was having a rendezvous with a young female passenger in a secluded spot just aft of the funnel but on the night in question when the food reverted to normal the baker had been too busy so the greaser had had to do a hurried char up himself.
He told me that he had made eyes at the lady during the Atlantic leg while bronzing himself on the fore deck and after an exchange of notes via a steward messenger he arranged to meet her ashore during the scheduled overnight stop at Balboa. It turned out to be a week or more in that port after we had collided with another ship in the Miraflores lakes and passion had been allowed to develop.
My breakfast cooking provided the perfect foil for his trysts while his baker mate helped him out by keeping me happily fed.
I had to read the riot act to him, curbed my envy and all that, and I allowed him one more night of ecstasy and indiscretion to tell the lady that she would have to wait until we arrived in Wellington for more amour which was only a week away.
This recall sees the envy creeping back even today.

Bob
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  #52  
Old 31st December 2008, 09:56
chuckrose chuckrose is offline  
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In regards to your menu it will depend on what your daily feeding rate is. Also the length of trips and of course the crew.
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  #53  
Old 31st December 2008, 10:21
Anchorman Anchorman is offline  
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Plenty of cash in HMC . Get them to buy a bread maker, guaranteed to get you some brownie points dishing up fresh bread everyday, and so simple.
Neil
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  #54  
Old 1st January 2009, 13:15
ALAN TYLER ALAN TYLER is offline  
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Smile

Hi Mark,* Well* done,* it* sounds* (and* looks)* as* if* every* thing* went* to* plan. As* time* goes* by* you,ll* soon* find* out* which* dishes* are* favourites* among* the* crew.* Maybe* you* could* start* a* chef* of* the* year* award!!* ******************** All* the* best* for* 2009* and* keep* rattling those pots & pans!!
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  #55  
Old 1st January 2009, 13:18
ALAN TYLER ALAN TYLER is offline  
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Mark, Don,t know what with all the ****?
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  #56  
Old 1st January 2009, 21:18
marksleight marksleight is offline  
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Thanks Alan. Chef of the Year would pile a bit too much pressure on I think - I'll be happy enough with my dinner ending up in the crew rather than the bin!

Anchorman: I wish. They didn't even give me any gloves for working outside on deck!
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  #57  
Old 1st January 2009, 22:27
OllieUK OllieUK is offline  
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How long a voyage will you be undertaking, and will the crew remain the same throughout? are you on a budget?


Breakfast is usualy standard:
Porrige, Cereals, Toast, Preserves
Egg, Bacon, Sausage, Beans, Fried Bread, etc to stop monotony setting in change a few items per week for mushrooms, black pudding, french toast, tomatoes, scrambled egg.
* * * * *
Light Lunch:
Sandwiches, Bagettes, Sausage Rolls, Scotch Eggs, Pork Pies, Quiche, Omellets, salads,
For example, a sandwich and crips, pork pie pickle tomatoes, quiche and salad etc
* * * * *

Evening Main Meal

Curries, Chillies, Goulash, Stews, Minced Beef and mash & vegetables, Sausgae Mash and peas, fahjitas, Wraps, Stir fries, Pizza,

Think about how and what vegetables will be achievable to cook and serve up so they get eaten, not thrown away ( Thats a waste of time and money )

* * * * *

Do you have to provide a pudding?

Breakfast usualy works out quite high on the budget bacon especially is expensive.
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  #58  
Old 7th January 2009, 04:29
stevie burgess stevie burgess is offline  
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I don't want to be a kill joy but i think you guys should go on a proper cooks course for to be cooking for the crew.Don't dish out rubbish as the crew will retaliate.But of course keep things simple...basic meals go a long way,don't try anything too fancy!!
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  #59  
Old 10th January 2009, 21:26
Cornelia Cornelia is offline  
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I just know on one ship "Jonni Ritscher" - the cook was a philippine ex. computer programmer. The meal was usually: Rice with chicken, potatos with chicken, noodle-soup, beef with rice or potatoes and a few vegetables. For breakfast it was bread and eggs in various forms. There must have been plenty of onions onboard, as they came with almost everything we hate, I would not have been too surprised to find an onion-ring on the icecream we got once per week.
You could as well get makarels - but only if the crew was successful to catch any, which was not always the case :-)
The chicken was though a good option as there have been muslims onboard too.
I think, the cook will never be a chef on the "QM2" but the food was better than what some of you folks suggested, probably that is because I am not too fond of the English style of cooking
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  #60  
Old 19th January 2009, 22:00
marksleight marksleight is offline  
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OllieUK: 2 week patrols; no need to worry about breakfast - just lunch and dinner, which more often than not will be at the 'usual' time. We have a "chef of the day" which changes each day. There will be one, and sometimes two days on a patrol when I am going to be doing the cooking.

Stevie Burgess: Fair point, but with a 2 week on 2 week off rota, that could be a waste of money as I'll hardly be around to go. When I'm home I spend most of the time in the gym, and that's largely the reason why my culinary skills are comparatively poor; I tend to be pushed for time, and so things like pasta sauce comes straight out of a jar rather than being cooked up from raw ingredients, as is the way things are done aboard.

As it happens, I have just done my second chef day and this was largely a solo effort. My penne pasta and sauce was pretty OK and - I think - well received, but the chilli con carne was at risk at one point due to an absence of tomato pureť. That was rectified by a quick provisioning trip, which wouldn't have been an option were we not alongside.

I have been on board long enough now to see how others cope, and have resolved to pick myself up a decent cookbook and try some of that at home before my next patrol. I think that my confidence will improve the more I cook. I may even end up enjoying the experience; chef day is considered to be a day off. Most of the crew are helpful and will check up on things as the day goes on and chip-in with advice. None of us are recruited as cooks, and they remember being in my place once.

Thanks for all the tips and advice you've given me - and please continue discussing maritime fare amongst yourselves!
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  #61  
Old 27th January 2009, 03:10
stevie burgess stevie burgess is offline  
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Hi Marksleight,Glad you got yourself a cook book and trying to make an effort...didn't realise you were on that sort of rota whichever lot you are with...maybe i was a bit too blunt but i have been used to cooks deepsea that have gone through their tickets. Coincedentally i was called to join in drydock last month as Bosun and ended up cooking in the galley as the relief cook never got there(was for one week)it was only a skeleton crew aboard but they loved my grub....jack of all trades!! ha ha....quite enjoyed it i must admit for a change. Mind you i had to phone the wife to recap on how to make cream of chicken and mushroom soup...the boys loved it.
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  #62  
Old 29th September 2009, 13:12
ALAN TYLER ALAN TYLER is offline  
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Hi Mark, Several months have gone by now, just wondering how you,re getting on regarding your cooking skills. Hopefully the info the site gave helped you. Regards Alan.
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  #63  
Old 9th August 2010, 18:39
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BarnacleGrim BarnacleGrim is offline  
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You can say a lot about vegetarians, but they certainly don't deserve to eat those awful frozen briquettes they call veggieburgers every single day, as some cooks will have it.

There's a lot of really good Indian vegetarian dishes, just make some meat or fish on the side and everyone will be happy.

Dishes that respond well to microwaving will please the 12-4 and 4-8 watches. A good soup or a stew within reach. Comfort food.

Last edited by BarnacleGrim; 9th August 2010 at 18:45..
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  #64  
Old 10th August 2010, 21:05
jerome morris jerome morris is offline  
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When I was on tankers with Mobil Oil, they always had a meat dish at every meal.
Breakfast steaks, ground meat burgers, roast.
This kept everyone happy.
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  #65  
Old 10th August 2010, 21:22
Thats another Story Thats another Story is offline
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make a few pans of scouse if any left next day put leftovers in pastry. it with put hairs on your chest and muscles in your s..te
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  #66  
Old 10th August 2010, 21:37
John Dryden John Dryden is offline  
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Never heard that one before John(muscles),made me laugh!
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  #67  
Old 10th August 2010, 22:12
chris8527 chris8527 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cornelia View Post
I just know on one ship "Jonni Ritscher" - the cook was a philippine ex. computer programmer. The meal was usually: Rice with chicken, potatos with chicken, noodle-soup, beef with rice or potatoes and a few vegetables. For breakfast it was bread and eggs in various forms. There must have been plenty of onions onboard, as they came with almost everything we hate, I would not have been too surprised to find an onion-ring on the icecream we got once per week.
You could as well get makarels - but only if the crew was successful to catch any, which was not always the case :-)
The chicken was though a good option as there have been muslims onboard too.
I think, the cook will never be a chef on the "QM2" but the food was better than what some of you folks suggested, probably that is because I am not too fond of the English style of cooking
I couldn't resist this one....what exactly is the "English style of cooking?" Are we talking about over cooked meat, soggy veggies and a total absence of spices and taste?? Sorry, fellow Brits.
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  #68  
Old 10th August 2010, 22:24
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for the last few years i have never trusted a curry meal i heard of a robbery in a local restaurants and the robbers actually rang the police to tell them to look in the fridge locker they had alsatian dogs hanging in there so curry is a nono when i take the wife out for a meal{i wondered why i had a thing for pi..ing on lampposts}
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  #69  
Old 10th August 2010, 23:01
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When I was a young fellow it was common knowledge that every Chinee restaurant had their fridges full of cats and you never ever touched the dim sims...........

Vegans etc? Boiled spuds.... a complete meal.. full of good stuff.. as long as not boiled too long.... I had one( a vegan .. not a boiled spud) in my small crew a while back who would query what sort of oil had been used in the making of the ( shop bought ) biscuits but would pig out on Pringles in port.....

Another crew member gave me a copy of "Lobscouse and Spotted Dog' a while back... must have thought it would help me lift my game in the galley... it has the traditional recipes for all the meals mentioned in the Patrick O'Brien novels....

Includes such delights as 'Dried peas with lumps of pork', 'spotted dog', and 'drowned baby'.

I reckon tripe is good seagoing tucker... in white sauce...easy down... easy up...
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  #70  
Old 10th August 2010, 23:13
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I'm not kidding lads the restaurant was closed down and the owners prosecuted it was in Waterloo near were i live in Liverpool .john
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  #71  
Old 10th August 2010, 23:30
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if cooked right cat is as good as rabbit or chicken
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  #72  
Old 11th August 2010, 10:55
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BarnacleGrim BarnacleGrim is offline  
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Whoah! Just saw that I'm in fact the culprit who brought up this old thread. I don't know how it happened. Hope it's not too much frowned upon.
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  #73  
Old 11th August 2010, 12:15
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hen llongwr hen llongwr is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JOHN PRUDEN View Post
for the last few years i have never trusted a curry meal i heard of a robbery in a local restaurants and the robbers actually rang the police to tell them to look in the fridge locker they had alsatian dogs hanging in there so curry is a nono when i take the wife out for a meal{i wondered why i had a thing for pi..ing on lampposts}

Thanks John, I'm up in liverpool, this weekend,to see my Bro,
now the chikys off the menu.
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  #74  
Old 11th August 2010, 18:37
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Why just alsations? Maybe its like the Japanese thing about black cattle ( angus etc) producing more tender meat than reds like herefords.....

Not that I'm against the eating of alsations.... one bit me on the *rse in BA a year ago ... pity there aren't more chinamen here....
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  #75  
Old 11th August 2010, 19:15
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Originally Posted by Cisco View Post
Why just alsations? Maybe its like the Japanese thing about black cattle ( angus etc) producing more tender meat than reds like herefords.....

Not that I'm against the eating of alsations.... one bit me on the *rse in BA a year ago ... pity there aren't more chinamen here....
must just be a size thing cisco? you wouldn't get many meals out of a jack Russellthe Labrador retriever i have got now would keep them going for months. half dog half mattress all nine stone of him
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