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  #26  
Old 6th December 2008, 23:40
JoK JoK is offline  
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JoK: Good point, thanks. I feel a bit stupid for not picking up on that one! Omlettes - yep, that works, cheers.
No need to feel stupid. I have stood many 12-4 and 4-8 watches. You haven't.
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  #27  
Old 8th December 2008, 09:21
Chouan Chouan is offline  
 
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Problem with omelettes is that people like them in different ways, rather like differing styles of steak, well done to rare, and cooking them to that person's taste may not be easy.
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  #28  
Old 8th December 2008, 18:34
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Hash cakes always went down well for breakfast when you had just come off watch. Just make corned beef hash using canned corned beef, diced onion and mashed potato. Form into cakes about the size of a beefburger and lightly coat with plain flour, then fry both sides until crispy. Served with fried egg and baked beans it is delicious.
I still make this about once a week fifty years after first tasting it on the Achilles.
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  #29  
Old 8th December 2008, 18:42
sidsal sidsal is offline  
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Delicate pea soup is a must. here's the recipe.
Take a pint of luke warm water and whip until it is a moderately thick and creamy. Take a needle and thread and one Marrowfat pea. Thread the needle and pierce the pea. Bring the creamy water to a boil and dip the pea into it for 5 seconds only, Withdraw the pea. Serve with croutons.
If a stronger soup is preferred leave the pea dangling for 10 or 15 seconds.
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  #30  
Old 8th December 2008, 19:03
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Originally Posted by Pat Kennedy View Post
Hash cakes always went down well for breakfast when you had just come off watch. Just make corned beef hash using canned corned beef, diced onion and mashed potato. Form into cakes about the size of a beefburger and lightly coat with plain flour, then fry both sides until crispy. Served with fried egg and baked beans it is delicious.
I still make this about once a week fifty years after first tasting it on the Achilles.
Hash cakes on an HM Customs Cutter - maybe won't go down too well, eh!

Oh oh, you meant corned beef! Hopefully they will seize plenty of the other kind of hash on their patrols.
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  #31  
Old 12th December 2008, 18:39
marksleight marksleight is offline  
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Hash cakes on an HM Customs Cutter - maybe won't go down too well, eh!
LOL... Yeah, and washed down with some Coke too maybe?
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  #32  
Old 18th December 2008, 23:25
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Corned beef hash topped with a fried egg, easy to do and very tasty.
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  #33  
Old 19th December 2008, 00:52
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Sidsal, there is one better than the delicate pea soup and that is passover chicken broth. Just pass the chicken over the boiling water then put it back in the fridge.

Bob
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  #34  
Old 20th December 2008, 11:37
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Chief Engineer's Daughter Chief Engineer's Daughter is offline  
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Work on the KISS principal. Keep It Simple Stupid! (Not referring to you!)

I have cooked in a very small galley on board a sailing ship for a bunch of hungry teenagers. They ate everything served up to them so it couldn't have been too bad! One suprise favourite was boiled beef with carrots, cabbage and mashed potatoes. Soup is good for lunch with sandwiches. If you get the chance, do some baking, that'll impress. Roasts are a winner. You can bung them in the oven and walk away.
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  #35  
Old 20th December 2008, 16:20
marksleight marksleight is offline  
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Chief Engineer's Daughter: I agree with your outlook. I won't be cooking up anything that is going to push my culinary performance envelope until I have tried it out at home first!

I got a call the other day and was told that I am cooking on Boxing Day (OMG that's only 6 days away...), and "it shouldn't be too hard as it'll just be leftovers". I think I am being treated kindly for this trip: being allowed to get off with turkey sandwiches or something along those lines.

But I'd like to have a hot meal lined up for Boxing Day evening just to be on the safe side, and am thinking of something with rice or noodles, such as a Thai curry or stir fry. Both are meals I am comfortable with and can be adapted for any vegetarians there may be on board.

Anyone see any potential pitfalls with either option? I'm keen to avoid using the oven first time round as it's apparently slow to heat up, and I have enough to worry about catering for nine without flapping over that!
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  #36  
Old 20th December 2008, 20:38
sidsal sidsal is offline  
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Bob Jenkins.
Your delicate chicken broth is not unknown to me but I was told that the chicken needed to be a live one. The method was to erect a walkway with some timber battens over the galley stove and have a strong cargo lamp above it. You put some string around the chicken's leg and walked it over the boiling water on the stove so that its shadow fell on the water. If this broth wasn't strong enough you walked the chicken back the other way so that its shadow again fell on the water.
(No charge for this recipe !)
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  #37  
Old 20th December 2008, 20:44
sidsal sidsal is offline  
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When I was in Brocklebank's MAIHAR in ww2 there was no fridge - only an ice box. The food was pretty awful particularly in hot weather. There was always boiled pudding on the dinner menu - all in individual pots. Each day it had a different name - College Pudding, Cabinet pudding, Black-cap pudding, etc. Rumour had it that the cook climbed the funnel ladder and threw a handful of currants through the galley skylight and depending on how high he went - so the pud was named. For instance if he only climbed a rung or 2, most of the currants would hit their targhet and it would be black-cap pud.
All very technical !
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  #38  
Old 20th December 2008, 21:16
Andy Lavies Andy Lavies is offline  
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Do breakfast cereals in modern ships still harbour the same livestock that we used to get in Bank Line? Amazing how those weevils could swim when you poured on the diluted sweetened condensed milk. The cockroach fried into my breakfast egg was dead, though. Good protein, all the same.
Andy
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  #39  
Old 20th December 2008, 22:16
JoK JoK is offline  
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I was on 15, 16 ships and never saw a roach. Wouldn't know one if I tripped over it.
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  #40  
Old 21st December 2008, 16:34
sidsal sidsal is offline  
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JoK. You are lucky no to have come across cockroaches ! Brocklebank ships were full of them - and weevils too !
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  #41  
Old 21st December 2008, 23:21
notnila notnila is offline  
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Every ship I was in had cockroaches.When squirted with the dreaded"IMSHI"on a certain Baron Boat ,they would turn on you and fight back!
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  #42  
Old 22nd December 2008, 17:02
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Originally Posted by JoK View Post
I was on 15, 16 ships and never saw a roach. Wouldn't know one if I tripped over it.
Should have gone to 'Specsavers'.
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  #43  
Old 23rd December 2008, 15:54
ALAN TYLER ALAN TYLER is offline  
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Smile

Hi Mark, So the big day is fast approaching. The stir fry sounds good to me, quick and easy, don,t forget though regarding the seasoning, you can add but you can,t take out!! As for the suggested roast, okay you can walk away, but not for too long unless you want dried up meat. Anyway hope all goes well for you.
Happy Festive Season Alan.

PS, is it a "dry" ship/boat
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  #44  
Old 24th December 2008, 01:49
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Chief Engineer's Daughter Chief Engineer's Daughter is offline  
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I was on 15, 16 ships and never saw a roach. Wouldn't know one if I tripped over it.
Lucky you! Once had some sort of long legged bird in the galley which lived on the cockroaches!

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Originally Posted by ALAN TYLER View Post
As for the suggested roast, okay you can walk away, but not for too long unless you want dried up meat.
True, but an occassional baste makes all the difference.

Quote:
Originally Posted by marksleight View Post
But I'd like to have a hot meal lined up for Boxing Day evening just to be on the safe side, and am thinking of something with rice or noodles, such as a Thai curry or stir fry.

I like Thai currys but some members of the crew might find one a tad too hot for them. Keep that until you are sure of everyones taste. Stir fry sounds good.

I visited the Seeker once when she was in Lerwick. There wasn't a great deal of room to cook in and, if memory serves me correctly, the way into the accomodation was through the galley.

Good Luck!
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  #45  
Old 24th December 2008, 03:41
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Who doesn't like pizza?
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  #46  
Old 30th December 2008, 17:48
marksleight marksleight is offline  
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Hi all. I got back from my first patrol yesterday afternoon. I've had so much to do that it only felt like I was away a couple of days!

My Chief Engineer is a star. He's been at sea since he was 17 and took me under his wing for Boxing Day lunch and dinner. Talking to everyone on board, it seems that it is quite common to be apprehensive about your first Chef Day, and it takes a few goes before you are comfortable with whole thing.

It's about 18 months since I last set foot on a Cutter, and in my mind's eye the galley had shrunk; in reality it is quite a bit larger than my wardrobe there's ample preparation room as long as you keep on top of the washing-up.

Lunch was cheese and ham loaded potato skins which went down a storm. I will try that one at home as a treat for the wife who pays a fortune for them at Sainsbury's. The evening meal was about a hectare of bubble and squeak, with a plate of turkey and ham slices, another couple of plates of nibbles (jalapeno's etc) that were ready-to-cook and another dish of the leftover stuffing. Everybody was still stuffed from Christmas dinner and not a lot got eaten. I was told by several people that I mustn't take that as a reflection of my cooking!

I've attached an action shot of my potato skins in the making ...

I'm going "solo" on January 19th during my next patrol. We don't work the 24 hour watch system JoK referred to, so aside from operational issues, lunch and dinner should be the same time for all. My next lunch will be penne pasta with an as yet undecided sauce, whilst the dinner will be chilli-con-carne, but as mild as I can make it. The number of people saying "it could do with being hotter" will guide me for future. In February I will probably go for an omlette lunch and a Thai Red Chicken Curry, again opting for the mild side of mild.

Unlike Boxing Day when we were alongside, I will probably be cooking whilst at sea next time. And as we are moving to the Scottish patrol area just in time for my next Chef Day, the weather should add a challenging dimension!

Thanks for all the advice and suggestions to date. Keep them coming as until the ingredients have been purchased my meal plans can be changed!

Alan: We are on 30 minutes notice for sea when alongside and the drink/drive rules apply throughout the duration of the patrol. I'm told that in days gone by the crews had a reputation of being hard drinkers but these days a more professional image is maintained!

Chief Engineer's Daughter: If you're coming from the aft deck then yes, you'd go through the galley. If you're anywhere else, then the galley is out of the way. We're considerate types so if someone is working in the galley then we'd use one of the doors on either side and leave the Chef uninterrupted. I'm hoping we'll visit Lerwick whilst I'm on Seeker (from mid-January to probably at least September); as I recall there is a rather good Chinese restaurant at the North end of the Esplanade. If you see Seeker over the next few months then there's a 50/50 chance I'll be on board.
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File Type: jpg PotatoFest.jpg (119.0 KB, 78 views)
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  #47  
Old 30th December 2008, 17:59
rabaul rabaul is offline  
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I always enjoyed the sandwiches that were left for me in a tupperware box to help me through the 8-12 watch. Cornbeef , cheese or salad were fine but my favourite was ' puppy sick' sandwiches - Heinz sandwich spread . Can still be found in the best of super markets. Try it you will not be disappointed.
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  #48  
Old 30th December 2008, 19:18
degsy degsy is offline  
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puppy sick butties an plazzy boxes

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I always enjoyed the sandwiches that were left for me in a tupperware box to help me through the 8-12 watch. Cornbeef , cheese or salad were fine but my favourite was ' puppy sick' sandwiches - Heinz sandwich spread . Can still be found in the best of super markets. Try it you will not be disappointed.
God that opened the memory box I remember a 4th Eng telling me never leave em in the box throw em over the wall if you dont eat them. And 'puppy sick' was my favourite as well .
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  #49  
Old 31st December 2008, 02:02
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Chief Engineer's Daughter Chief Engineer's Daughter is offline  
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Excellent action packed photo Mark. Do you no wear a pinnie to keep your uniform clean?
The Chinese you are thinking of is the Great Wall or The Muckle Dyke as it's known locally.
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  #50  
Old 31st December 2008, 09:13
marksleight marksleight is offline  
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I decided to trust to luck and the fact I had spare kit available in the event of accidents...

Anyways, that picture was MMS'd to the wife and if she'd seen me wearing a pinnie then I would never hear the end of it!
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