Galley Location - Page 2 - Ships Nostalgia
00:20

Welcome
Welcome!Welcome to Ships Nostalgia, the world's greatest online community for people worldwide with an interest in ships and shipping. Whether you are crew, ex-crew, ship enthusiasts or cruisers, this is the forum for you. And what's more, it's completely FREE.

Click here to go to the forums home page and find out more.
Click here to join.
Log in
User Name Password

Galley Location

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #26  
Old 5th November 2019, 16:29
kewl dude's Avatar
kewl dude kewl dude is online now  
Senior Member
Organisation: Other Merchant Fleets
Department: Engineering
Active: 1960 - 1976
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,580
The US Flag ships I sailed had a night cook/baker who worked midnight - 0800. He was like a short order cook who made anything one wanted for breakfast, when those on the 12-4 got off @ 0400. He prepared 0800 breakfast for the whole crew, served by the day shift; along with baking fresh breads and rolls.

Greg Hayden
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 5th November 2019, 21:44
Mad Landsman's Avatar
Mad Landsman Mad Landsman is online now  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 6,300
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry t. View Post
The ships cook, wee Billy, all off 4 foot eleven off him, regimental cook ex. Irish Guards,
More likely Welsh Guards - During WW2 they famously abandoned the height restriction. As my father used to call them: 'little dark haired men from the mines'.
__________________
Malcolm.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 6th November 2019, 00:16
Pat Kennedy's Avatar
Pat Kennedy Pat Kennedy is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 13,995
Quote:
Originally Posted by kewl dude View Post
The US Flag ships I sailed had a night cook/baker who worked midnight - 0800. He was like a short order cook who made anything one wanted for breakfast, when those on the 12-4 got off @ 0400. He prepared 0800 breakfast for the whole crew, served by the day shift; along with baking fresh breads and rolls.

Greg Hayden
I wish we had one of them Greg. All the ships I was in, the galley was in lockdown throughout the night. The cook would leave a tray of cold cuts and salad out in the sailors mess which was all gone within half an hour.
I once visited an American ship in Kobe, it was called Golden Bear, and I was stunned by the amount of grub available during the night, plus endless coffee and a Coca Cola machine. Amazing!
Regards
Pat
__________________
"Life is a waste of time, and time is a waste of life. Get wasted all the time, and you'll have the time of your life!"
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 6th November 2019, 07:27
kewl dude's Avatar
kewl dude kewl dude is online now  
Senior Member
Organisation: Other Merchant Fleets
Department: Engineering
Active: 1960 - 1976
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,580
I meant to but forgot to mention the cookies usually oatmeal and chocolate chip. They were stocked in large glass cookie jars with the lid on a slant in the galley help yourself.

Greg
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 6th November 2019, 16:38
Pat Kennedy's Avatar
Pat Kennedy Pat Kennedy is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 13,995
Now I come to think of it, every cargo ship I was in had the galley on the Port side. I wonder now if there was a particular reason for this.
__________________
"Life is a waste of time, and time is a waste of life. Get wasted all the time, and you'll have the time of your life!"
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 6th November 2019, 19:39
seaman38 seaman38 is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 777
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat Kennedy View Post
Now I come to think of it, every cargo ship I was in had the galley on the Port side. I wonder now if there was a particular reason for this.
Were the ships built by the same yard? or belonging to same company

I have found that with sailing with different companies but the ships built in the same yard the accommodation layout rarely changes. Most of the ships I sailed on had the galley on the centre line at aft end of accommodation, with deck crews and P O's messrooms adjacent (across the alleyway) on the starboard side and engineroom crew on port side

Food for thought
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 6th November 2019, 21:08
Pat Kennedy's Avatar
Pat Kennedy Pat Kennedy is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 13,995
Quote:
Originally Posted by seaman38 View Post
Were the ships built by the same yard? or belonging to same company

I have found that with sailing with different companies but the ships built in the same yard the accommodation layout rarely changes. Most of the ships I sailed on had the galley on the centre line at aft end of accommodation, with deck crews and P O's messrooms adjacent (across the alleyway) on the starboard side and engineroom crew on port side

Food for thought
Well lets see.
I have 64 ships in my discharge book. 10 of them were repeats, 3 were tankers, 2 were ore carriers, 2 were passenger liners, and 2 were coasters.
That leaves 45 general cargo ships. 26 were Blue Funnel, mostly built to very similar designs. The remaining 19 were various companies built by various yards, and on all of these 45, I am fairly sure the galleys were on the port side. The only ones I am uncertain of are the Vives (Mac Andrews), Cotopaxi (PSNC) Essequibo (Royal Mail) Tactician(Harrisons)and Waipawa, (SSA).
Regardless of where the galley was sited, the very worst feeder was the Cotopaxi.
__________________
"Life is a waste of time, and time is a waste of life. Get wasted all the time, and you'll have the time of your life!"
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 7th November 2019, 00:49
makko's Avatar
makko makko is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1979 - 1998
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
My location
Posts: 5,746
Quote:
Originally Posted by kewl dude View Post
The US Flag ships I sailed had a night cook/baker who worked midnight - 0800. He was like a short order cook who made anything one wanted for breakfast, when those on the 12-4 got off @ 0400. He prepared 0800 breakfast for the whole crew, served by the day shift; along with baking fresh breads and rolls.

Greg Hayden
One of the first jobs was to fabricate duplicate keys. Leave the wives to send bacon sandwiches down to the ER on 12-04 watch! Then there was the "geyser", used to boil eggs to accompany the bacon sandwiches........!

All Galleys, port side a la Pat Kennedy, even in modern vessels.

The fly in the soup were the Norwegian RoRos. Microwaveable meals in trays, in the mess. Then again, they ran 18 crew total compared to 28 on Blue Funnel (80's).

Rgds.
Dave
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 7th November 2019, 01:15
kewl dude's Avatar
kewl dude kewl dude is online now  
Senior Member
Organisation: Other Merchant Fleets
Department: Engineering
Active: 1960 - 1976
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,580
Cooking hot dogs wrapped in tinfoil on the steam air ejectors - bare (not insulated) forged steel shapes. External reinforcing in the shape of ribs the long way. Just lay the dogs in the top valley. Did not take long.

Greg
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 8th November 2019, 01:55
John Melbourne John Melbourne is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 7
Galleys

I have wondered from time to time about this question. Memory dims and I ask myself where were the officer saloons on the Wave and Tide class RFA tankers.
Grateful for a little enlightenment.
Thanks
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off




Support SN


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.