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  #1  
Old 7th December 2018, 15:13
Tim Gibbs's Avatar
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Machinery Horrors

In relatively recent times mv Dilkara (1971-1986) must take some beating. She had 3 x 18 cylinder Pielstick 2.2 engines (54 pistons,54 fuel pumps & injectors, 12 turbochargers, 108 exhaust valves ...... etc) geared to one shaft with a 3000KVA alternator attached to the two forward engines and all connect by Fawick pneumatic clutches.
I think it was around Christmas 1975 she had a fire whilst entering San Francisco and after establishing that no one was injured there was some rejoicing in the company because it might prove to be the end of her!
I was dispatched to see what could be done and unfortunately the damage wasn't terminal and she was returned to service after a few weeks. But not before she was fined (not for the first time ) for making polluting smoke as she departed. It was long before the days of AIS but if you ever wanted to know where she was, you just had to follow the plume of smoke across the Pacific!
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Old 7th December 2018, 22:46
dannic dannic is offline  
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Oilibiri can beat that, 27500 dwt tanker with 2 x 6 cylinder Yugoslav built B&W main engines and 5 x V18 pielsticks. Four aux engines on tanktop and connected through pneumatic clutch to cargo pumps, middle two also had 440v alternators on aft end. 5th engine on bottom plates between main engines with just alternator
Also had a Brotherhood (copy) turbo alternator! And in early days they found casting faults in all aux engine cylinder heads so all 90 heads had to be changed!
Dannic
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Old 8th December 2018, 10:42
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Ok - i guess your 5 trump my 3 but they supposedly 9000hp each! Do I get any credit for 3 into 1 box, 5 Fawick clutches and the 2 speed increasing gearboxes I forgot ?!
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Old 8th December 2018, 12:43
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Varley Varley is offline   SN Supporter
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I think we will give you the hand. Let's wait and see if anyone else comes up to claim the rubber.
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Old 8th December 2018, 15:23
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Someone lent me a Morris Ital...
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  #6  
Old 8th December 2018, 16:25
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Someone lent me a Morris Ital...
Ah! My first "office "car! First long drive - towed out of the Mersey Tunnel with a seized gearbox
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Old 8th December 2018, 17:14
stevekelly10 stevekelly10 is offline  
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6xM.A.N V18 Engines driving 2.5 MW 11000 volt generators. propulsion 2shaft CP propellers. 4 thrusters electrically driven, two fire pumps driven by pneumatic clutches off main propulsion units and two fire pumps electrically driven, direct online. I am talking about BP's Emergency support vessel Iolair.I was on it shortly after she entered service. The engines had numerous problems and tended to shake themselves apart ! the record for having all 6 engines available for service at one time was 20 minutes ! The worst event was when we had biological contaminated diesel fuel and were ordered out of BP's Forties Field as our last engine was struggling to run. Specially charted helicopter flew out 108 fuel injector pumps and 108 fuel injectors as the old one were wrecked ! not one of my better trips
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  #8  
Old 9th December 2018, 14:17
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Originally Posted by dannic View Post
Oilibiri can beat that, 27500 dwt tanker with 2 x 6 cylinder Yugoslav built B&W main engines and 5 x V18 pielsticks. Four aux engines on tanktop and connected through pneumatic clutch to cargo pumps, middle two also had 440v alternators on aft end. 5th engine on bottom plates between main engines with just alternator
Also had a Brotherhood (copy) turbo alternator! And in early days they found casting faults in all aux engine cylinder heads so all 90 heads had to be changed!
Dannic
On reflection [B]dannic[B] I think I should concede to you as I've just realised that the Pielsticks you referred to are in fact Hedemoras ........ which we used to refer to a revolving dynamite
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Old 10th December 2018, 10:06
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On reflection [B]dannic[B] I think I should concede to you as I've just realised that the Pielsticks you referred to are in fact Hedemoras ........ which we used to refer to a revolving dynamite
Lovely things Hedemouras ... I once saw one that had oversped and just about cut itself in two ... happily we binned them all after that and re-engined that rig with Wartsilas.
Hedemoura engines only saving grace was that heads, pistons, liners etc were light enough not to need lifting equipment ... handy really given the regularity with which they needed changing. And as for those main bearings ...
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  #10  
Old 10th December 2018, 15:30
sternchallis sternchallis is offline
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Whilst serving my Apprenticeship in Hull United Towing bought a Tug off the Japanese, who had had it built by the Americans or at least the engines supplied by them. Circa 1972, so it could have been built 1960's.
It was twin screw with two engines to each shaft through agearbox and clutches.
Each engine was a V, I run out of fingers after 10 cylinders.

Then I think they had 4 generators fwd of them all of those V's with numerous cylinders. All the heads for the ME's and gennies were alloy.

Somebody from United Towing might be able to flesh out the details and any horror stories of the Statesman .

The American engine manufacturers could never produce an engine that delivered much power per cylinder, but had to have more cylinders to make up for it. No different in the auto industry.

Those Hedemoras sound a bundle of laughs.

Never sail on any ship that has engines begining with P, such as Paxmans, Pielstics, Pdoxfords and Pdeltics.
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  #11  
Old 12th December 2018, 00:54
dannic dannic is offline  
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Originally Posted by Tim Gibbs View Post
On reflection [B]dannic[B] I think I should concede to you as I've just realised that the Pielsticks you referred to are in fact Hedemoras ........ which we used to refer to a revolving dynamite
No idea about Hedamora, not heard of them! these were pielstick licensed, in yugoslavia. And missed a zero out, was 275000 dwt not 27500!
Dannic.
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  #12  
Old 12th December 2018, 01:30
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Hedemora brings to me the image of a Norton motor bicycle engine cornering both ways at once and with perennial lost motion in the fuel rack, used for no good reason as a generator. Tor Caledonia?

There was well known UK rep for Hedemora. If one had only ever heard of Hedemora from a distance one should remember his name (regrettably addiction to alcohol may have wiped that particular memory location).

Last edited by Varley; 12th December 2018 at 10:24..
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  #13  
Old 12th December 2018, 10:04
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Lovely things Hedemouras ... And as for those main bearings ...
Absolutel, that MB arrangement was something else. Don't know if it's true but someone told me some years ago that they were originally developed for submarines. The best thing for them, so submerge them .... in 300 metres of salt water.
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  #14  
Old 13th December 2018, 11:24
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Originally Posted by dannic View Post
No idea about Hedamora, not heard of them! these were pielstick licensed, in yugoslavia. And missed a zero out, was 275000 dwt not 27500!
Dannic.
Ah! If a 275000 tonner I guess Hedamora's (even in the unlikely event of being capable of working at full power) wouldn't be big enough for your cargo pumps so they must be Pielstick 2.? ( not the Hedamora's they produced under licence)
So it's no contest - your 5 definitely trump my 3 !!
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  #15  
Old 13th December 2018, 19:58
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Hedemoras...…… ahhhhhhhhhhhh …..Texaco Copenhagen, Denmark and Norway, think the Sweden had one as well, lucky the lube oil was f.o.c. Think they were V16's coupled to a Asea alternator, I could be wrong....
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  #16  
Old 13th December 2018, 23:23
mrcruisine mrcruisine is offline  
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Machinery Horrors Indeed

Sailed back in late 70's early 80's on very fast reefer ships Polar Colombia and Polar Ecuador owned by Uiterwyk Lines (these were of 6 ex Hamburg Sud ships, with first ship computer, filled a whole room, plus electric slip couplings and host of other innovative German tech at the time) but they had main propulsion of 2 x French V16 Pielsticks, bleeding nightmare, they used to snap off head bolts and it was all down to try extract remains from cylinder block and change out, usually running at reduced speed on other engine. We used to run at 23 knots with banana's so pressure was on to keep moving. Many "happy"memories of these beasts
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  #17  
Old 13th December 2018, 23:26
mrcruisine mrcruisine is offline  
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PS these Pielsticks were renowned for crankcase explosions and a few deaths of poor engineers and it was crucial to make sure that crankcase oil mist detectors were working and engine shutdown if main bearing overheating occurred lest it blow up. Never stand by a crankcase cover I was advised
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  #18  
Old 14th December 2018, 01:03
Victor J. Croasdale Victor J. Croasdale is offline  
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I was on the Sig Ragne (Cargo ship 11,857 grt,completed by Upper Clyde SB, Scotstoun 6/71)
Sulzer main engine
3 Paxman Diesel Alternators
4 Sharples oil purifiers 2 heavy fuel, I Diesel and 1 Lub oil/Diesel

Joined the ship as 4th Eng in Singapore early May 78. Got nearly a week in Singers as the ship had broke down on passage from Hong Kong.
There was a Paxman guy on board he'd just rebuilt one of the D/As but he left at Singapore. Unfortunately that D/A had its alternator rotor on the aft deck, it had been rewound and delivered at Singapore. On passage to Durban we had an alternator failure when the old man insisted on starting a fire pump for Board of Trade sports. As it took two D/As to run the ship we came to an unexpected stop.
We had one alternator to provide power to the accommodation, so we set to moving the alternator from the failed set to the rebuilt engine. The next day the other alternator failed and we were using the emergency alternator, then it failed and we had to light the oil navigation lamps (complete with red and green oil). We got the emergency genset running. Then we got a main alternator ready to start. By this time we had no compressed air. The emergency air start compressor stared up with a bit of assistance but filled the engine room with smoke, so we all sat out on deck till we got pressure. The Sig Ragne did not have a control room and most of the motor starter were local. We positioned GP ratings at each starter with a watch and a time after the lights came on to press the button. We got it going, then we attended to things like pumping the bilges and carried on with the alternator swap.
To do this we went on 8 hrs on 8 hrs off and just stop for meals. For cooking we made a barbie out of an oil drum and cooked out on deck, not enough power for the galley. Eventually we got another D/A running.
Starting the main engine. When we checked the main engine we found a leaking intercooler tube, so pull off the ends turn two plugs on the lathe and hit them in with a hammer. After 6 days adrift we got under way. Fortunately the weather had been perfect.
The other fun was with the Sharples purifiers. During the time we had been stopped with power available I had managed to get the day tanks full.
I came up with a procedure to keep them running, they got striped and cleaned every day. If you went longer then solids built up between the plates, cleaning every day could be done in under an hour, if the solids built up between the plates it was an all day job.

When we got to Durban we had several days in a repair yard.

Other than a collision, while we were tied up on the buoys in Lagos; running out of fresh water because of leaks on the coolers; the old man having a heart attack and being sent home; finding and following a trail of blood to the end and finding the bosun after someone had parted his hair with a iron bar; wrapping a mooring line round the prop when a tug let it go after pulling us the wharf at Duala. Cameroon, the rest of the trip was fairly uneventful.

Last edited by Victor J. Croasdale; 14th December 2018 at 01:07..
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  #19  
Old 14th December 2018, 04:35
Chillytoes Chillytoes is offline  
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Going back to the first post - Dilkara's story looks like a carbon copy of Allunga, one of her sisters in the now defunct PAD line. The third sister was Paralla. Don't know much about her life, but Allunga was something of a horror.
Saw the remains of Paralla in Kaoshuing breakers, December 1986.
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  #20  
Old 24th December 2018, 03:23
Dave Lambert Dave Lambert is offline  
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Sailed with similar arrangement. We used to call the space between the engines "death valley". Taking the log down there was done very quickly just in case an explosion door released or something more solid came out. But having said that as long as you did the maintenance as recommended by Pielstick religiously the engines would behave themselves ... and I mean religiously.
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  #21  
Old 24th December 2018, 22:03
dannic dannic is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Victor J. Croasdale View Post
I was on the Sig Ragne (Cargo ship 11,857 grt,completed by Upper Clyde SB, Scotstoun 6/71)
Sulzer main engine
3 Paxman Diesel Alternators
4 Sharples oil purifiers 2 heavy fuel, I Diesel and 1 Lub oil/Diesel

Joined the ship as 4th Eng in Singapore early May 78. Got nearly a week in Singers as the ship had broke down on passage from Hong Kong.
There was a Paxman guy on board he'd just rebuilt one of the D/As but he left at Singapore. Unfortunately that D/A had its alternator rotor on the aft deck, it had been rewound and delivered at Singapore. On passage to Durban we had an alternator failure when the old man insisted on starting a fire pump for Board of Trade sports. As it took two D/As to run the ship we came to an unexpected stop.
We had one alternator to provide power to the accommodation, so we set to moving the alternator from the failed set to the rebuilt engine. The next day the other alternator failed and we were using the emergency alternator, then it failed and we had to light the oil navigation lamps (complete with red and green oil). We got the emergency genset running. Then we got a main alternator ready to start. By this time we had no compressed air. The emergency air start compressor stared up with a bit of assistance but filled the engine room with smoke, so we all sat out on deck till we got pressure. The Sig Ragne did not have a control room and most of the motor starter were local. We positioned GP ratings at each starter with a watch and a time after the lights came on to press the button. We got it going, then we attended to things like pumping the bilges and carried on with the alternator swap.
To do this we went on 8 hrs on 8 hrs off and just stop for meals. For cooking we made a barbie out of an oil drum and cooked out on deck, not enough power for the galley. Eventually we got another D/A running.
Starting the main engine. When we checked the main engine we found a leaking intercooler tube, so pull off the ends turn two plugs on the lathe and hit them in with a hammer. After 6 days adrift we got under way. Fortunately the weather had been perfect.
The other fun was with the Sharples purifiers. During the time we had been stopped with power available I had managed to get the day tanks full.
I came up with a procedure to keep them running, they got striped and cleaned every day. If you went longer then solids built up between the plates, cleaning every day could be done in under an hour, if the solids built up between the plates it was an all day job.

When we got to Durban we had several days in a repair yard.

Other than a collision, while we were tied up on the buoys in Lagos; running out of fresh water because of leaks on the coolers; the old man having a heart attack and being sent home; finding and following a trail of blood to the end and finding the bosun after someone had parted his hair with a iron bar; wrapping a mooring line round the prop when a tug let it go after pulling us the wharf at Duala. Cameroon, the rest of the trip was fairly uneventful.
Sharples Gravitrol purifiers, had them on Lumiere, Luminetta (Moss tankers).. HFO would last maybe a few days as were supposed to be self cleaning, but luboil were every second day, and both had to be running, 1 on each pielstick main engine! 5th engineer rarely left puri flat. Not much better than sharples super centrifuges on old cargo boats, 17000 revs per minute and dc faceplate starter....next to drive pulleys!
Dannic.
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  #22  
Old 1st March 2019, 11:01
douglasjamesmichael douglasjamesmichael is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Victor J. Croasdale View Post
I was on the Sig Ragne (Cargo ship 11,857 grt,completed by Upper Clyde SB, Scotstoun 6/71)
Sulzer main engine
3 Paxman Diesel Alternators
4 Sharples oil purifiers 2 heavy fuel, I Diesel and 1 Lub oil/Diesel

Joined the ship as 4th Eng in Singapore early May 78. Got nearly a week in Singers as the ship had broke down on passage from Hong Kong.
There was a Paxman guy on board he'd just rebuilt one of the D/As but he left at Singapore. Unfortunately that D/A had its alternator rotor on the aft deck, it had been rewound and delivered at Singapore. On passage to Durban we had an alternator failure when the old man insisted on starting a fire pump for Board of Trade sports. As it took two D/As to run the ship we came to an unexpected stop.
We had one alternator to provide power to the accommodation, so we set to moving the alternator from the failed set to the rebuilt engine. The next day the other alternator failed and we were using the emergency alternator, then it failed and we had to light the oil navigation lamps (complete with red and green oil). We got the emergency genset running. Then we got a main alternator ready to start. By this time we had no compressed air. The emergency air start compressor stared up with a bit of assistance but filled the engine room with smoke, so we all sat out on deck till we got pressure. The Sig Ragne did not have a control room and most of the motor starter were local. We positioned GP ratings at each starter with a watch and a time after the lights came on to press the button. We got it going, then we attended to things like pumping the bilges and carried on with the alternator swap.
To do this we went on 8 hrs on 8 hrs off and just stop for meals. For cooking we made a barbie out of an oil drum and cooked out on deck, not enough power for the galley. Eventually we got another D/A running.
Starting the main engine. When we checked the main engine we found a leaking intercooler tube, so pull off the ends turn two plugs on the lathe and hit them in with a hammer. After 6 days adrift we got under way. Fortunately the weather had been perfect.
The other fun was with the Sharples purifiers. During the time we had been stopped with power available I had managed to get the day tanks full.
I came up with a procedure to keep them running, they got striped and cleaned every day. If you went longer then solids built up between the plates, cleaning every day could be done in under an hour, if the solids built up between the plates it was an all day job.

When we got to Durban we had several days in a repair yard.

Other than a collision, while we were tied up on the buoys in Lagos; running out of fresh water because of leaks on the coolers; the old man having a heart attack and being sent home; finding and following a trail of blood to the end and finding the bosun after someone had parted his hair with a iron bar; wrapping a mooring line round the prop when a tug let it go after pulling us the wharf at Duala. Cameroon, the rest of the trip was fairly uneventful.
Wow....My second trip was on the Pig Ragne before going Steam as I am ex Weir's...as we had an over stock of pork.....Anyway we were in the Med and we lost a prop blade on a partially sunked container...until we shut the engine down the vibration ....unbelievable....drifted for a few days - bronzying waiting for a tug.....towed into Skaramanga dryock in Greece ------ we carried a spare prop...prop off - repack stern gland new prop on and awat we went on a CUFLET....Cuban Fleets Charter....to Roterdam, Felixstow....Havana. Matanzas, Santiago, Ceinfageous.loaded empty Containers - Cuflet & Morflot for Tenerefe, Bunkered then Montreal/seven Isles for grain to Cuba - 4 x port discharge - loaded Sugar for Leixeous Portugal - then Tilbury for containers...and pay off what a shithouse of a ship.....the cabin doors kept falling off the wardrobe doors the same...drawers all over the shop.....my wife was pissed off cleaning up our cabin the Old man and matey never visited our cabin in case they got a flea in their ear.....we had Russians and Yugoslavian Engineers and mates onboard one night for a party - we ran out of spirits.....had to send shore side for Havana club by the crate.....as usual great team **** ship.....UCS.....ruined the name of clyde shipbuilding....
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  #23  
Old 1st March 2019, 22:17
Victor J. Croasdale Victor J. Croasdale is offline  
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The MV Sig Ragne was built as Upper Clyde Shipbuilders were closing, the guys working there knew that when the ships on the blocks were complete, they were all on the dole.

I lived in Athens 1991 - 92 it was great. I met my wife there, we've been married over 26 years now.

I knew a guy who was an engineer at the shipyards there, he got me in for a tour round.

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  #24  
Old 2nd March 2019, 14:24
BOB.WHITTAKER BOB.WHITTAKER is offline  
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Don't forget the Hedemora V18A , Dive Support Vessel Uncle John had five of
them with provision to retrofit a sixth . However both crew and management had
the opinion there was enough trouble with five , I had early experience and I
understand the problems were finally resolved when she was re-engined with
Caterpillars .
I have read that the Australian Navy Collins Class submarines also had these
engines , whether they were the V18A or V18B I don't know and I have no
knowledge of their service experience , perhaps that is an Australian state secret.
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  #25  
Old 4th March 2019, 11:03
Ian860B Ian860B is offline  
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Read a lot of nasty stuff about Hedemora Generator sets, we had one on the Al Rafadain in the late 70's and believe it or not we found it reliable! as for the rest of the engine room plant it was a nightmare, we spent 36 hours in the middle of the ocean trying to get a fire in the main boiler, at least the Hedemora kept pounding away.
Why do ship designers ALWAYS put in emergency genneys that are too small? is it just to save a tiny amout of money?
Jock
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