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  #101  
Old 6th May 2018, 22:12
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japottinger japottinger is offline  
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Ken Dancy

Ken Dancy was 2nd mate on Bullard King's TSS Umgeni during trip Dec 1977 -March 1978
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  #102  
Old 6th May 2018, 23:53
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Stephen J. Card Stephen J. Card is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by japottinger View Post
Ken Dancy was 2nd mate on Bullard King's TSS Umgeni during trip Dec 1977 -March 1978
1947 to 1948?



The second of four boys, Kenneth Roger Dancy was born in North London on December 1 1924. His father was a businessman and the family later moved to a small village in Kent where Kenneth’s parents ran a sub-post office and general store.
He attended grammar school in north London until 1938, then the Skinners’ Grammar School, Tunbridge Wells, until 1941, when he joined the Merchant Navy as a Navigation Apprentice. He served on his first ship, Blackheath, for two years, and took part in convoys around the globe, winning an impressive clutch of campaign medals.
On one occasion, in the English Channel, when both the ship in front of his and the one behind were torpedoed, he reckoned he had survived because the U-boat crew were reloading their torpedo tubes as his ship passed. On another occasion in the Indian Ocean his ship was attacked by a Japanese submarine, but he was off-watch and slept through the action.
Dancy obtained his Master’s Certificate in 1950 and for some years was captain of a large tanker. He was on leave from his ship when the first mate of the Turmoil was taken ill, and he was asked to take his place to help in the rescue of Flying Enterprise. He had never been on a tug before.
In 1956, he married Petronella van den Tempel, a Dutch woman, and two years later he gave up sailing and settled in the Netherlands, where he worked for Phillips Radio and latterly for IBM.
Kenneth Dancy’s wife and two sons survive him. Captain Carlsen died in 1989.

Kenneth Dancy, born December 1 1924, died August 3 2013

Last edited by Stephen J. Card; 6th May 2018 at 23:58..
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  #103  
Old 7th May 2018, 00:23
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is online now  
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#103

Thank you for that, Stephen.

For sure, something in#102 didn't quite fit!
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  #104  
Old 7th May 2018, 08:01
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Stephen J. Card Stephen J. Card is offline  
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I'm sure just a typo.
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  #105  
Old 7th May 2018, 15:50
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is online now  
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I had not realised before that until the Flying Enterprise incident, Dancy had not previously served aboard a tugboat. His feat becomes comparable with falling down a lavatory and coming up with a gold watch! Astonishing in his skill and daring!
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  #106  
Old 7th May 2018, 16:51
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I knew Bill Carnegie who was Ch Eng in Turmoil. He told me that Capt Parker wanted Dancy to go over to the FE. He was on the focsle head getting ready and he decided it was too risky. A swell sent Turmoil against to the FE and Dancy might be crushed so he jumped.
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  #107  
Old 17th June 2018, 03:24
Keith Adams Keith Adams is offline  
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Ken Dancy received so much post mail from all over the world, much of it request to marry, that the Officers' Union set him up with a staffed office to take care of it. He became ( for a while in 1952) a Union Rep., and as such came aboard the PSNC mv "Losada" in London and signed me up ... I still have my Book with his signature. Great memories !
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  #108  
Old 17th June 2018, 05:25
tugger tugger is offline  
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Hi Barrie
I have been reading this post for the first time, when I came across your mention of having a copy of Nichols seamanship.
My Granddaughter has bought me an old book of Browns Practical pocket Book for Merchant seamen, second edition 1922, looks like it's been through the wars as the edges have been soaked a bit, unfortunately there is no name or any inscription in it.
Tugger
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  #109  
Old 22nd June 2018, 03:45
Klaatu83 Klaatu83 is offline  
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When I used to sail for Farrell Lines they were the only company in which we had to check in at their main office before joining the ships. They used to keep a lot of large models of the company's ships around the offices, presumably to impress the customers. I noticed one large model in a glass case that was gathering dust in the back of the office which was clearly the Flying Enterprise. Actually, that wasn't all that surprising since Isbrantsen Lines, which operated the Flying Enterprise, was subsequently taken over by American Export Lines which, in turn, was subsequently taken over by Farrell Lines. When I inquired about the model nobody in the office seemed to know anything about it, or have any idea of it's significance. Farrell Lines is gone now, so I wonder what happened to that model.
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  #110  
Old 24th June 2018, 17:59
Split Split is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roscoe_the_1st View Post
Hi I've just joined the forum.

Apart from my interest in anything to do with ships, one of my reasons for joining was a recent comment I heard from a lecture given by a well known historian (currently in the news) about the Flying Enterprise. The epic story was a major news story in 1952.

On 21 December 1951, under the command of Henrik Kurt Carlsen, she left Hamburg, Germany bound for the USA. Among her cargo was 1,270 long tons (1,290 t) of pig iron and 486 long tons (494 t) of coffee, 447 long tons (454 t) rags, 39 long tons (40 t) peat moss, twelve Volkswagen cars, antiques and antique musical instruments, typewriters, 447 long tons (454 t) of naphthalene as well as ten passengers. There is speculation that the cargo also included gold and zirconium.

That's the official story.

She was hit by a storm on Christmas night in the Western Approaches of the Atlantic. She was a Liberty Ship, built very quickly during WWII. She suffered structural damage and began listing. She sank on 10th January 1952.

Now you can get the story from Wikipedia Here

What caught my attention recently was the comment from the historian and he was talking about Fake News and how it is not new. As the news of Captain Carlson was shown all over the media at the time he remembered his mother's comment that 'The Government are hiding something here' .

I've been looking at the story of Captain Carlson and the Flying Enterprise and sure enough all is not what it seems.

Here are a few bullet points:
The Captain's reluctance to abandon ship.

The sudden appearance of US Navy warships surrounding the stricken ship. They sent nearby merchant ships that had answered the distress call away.

The fact that Falmouth was chosen as a port to try to tow her to when Cork was much closer. Half the distance.

The crew of the British Tug Turmoil was visited by the FBI when they reached harbour. Why did Kenneth Dancy (died in 2013) leap from the Turmoil onto the listing Flying Enterprise?

A statement from a diving company who had dived on the ship in 2002 saying that the wreck has been tampered with. Attempts to find out who has dived on the wreck has drawn a blank.

Questions about the ship's cargo is met with suspicion and silence even today.

The importance of the ships documents seemed to hold more importance than the safety of the crew.

Now the cover story is that she was carrying Zirconium which was to be used in the world's first Nuclear Submarine USS Nautilus.

But even this story does not stack up to close scrutiny. The main sources of Zirconium in order of quantity are Australia, Brazil, India, Ukraine, South Africa and the United States. Notice that Germany is not an exporter of Zirconium whereas the USA has its own supply. Plus I've never marked wartorn Germany as being an exporter (486 long tons apparently) of Coffee to the US.

She was coming from Hamburg to the US, this was just six years after WWII.

I suspect she was carrying something that the Powers That Be didn't want the world to see.
You sure she was a Liberty? It's a long time, since then, and I may be wrong. It's the year I was up for 2nd Mate. We used to call American Liberties Samboats. I thought that she was a Victory ship, or she may have been something else---"Cs" I think they were called.

Another story, not proven, I don't think, is that she had gold on board.

This is one of those unexplained mysteries. like the Bermuda triangle, Kennery's death, etc and, now, we have that passenger aircraft that disappeared, a few years ago. The Aussies think, now, that it was pilot suicide

Last edited by Split; 24th June 2018 at 18:03..
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  #111  
Old 24th June 2018, 18:14
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is online now  
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Merchant ships carry freight, for profit. That is their purpose in life.

Nothing which Flying Enterprise might have been carrying diminishes- nor could begin to diminish - the courage and professionalism of Carlsen and Dancy.

Here in SN we have an account given by Tsell, who was not far away at the time.
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  #112  
Old 25th June 2018, 01:12
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Samsette Samsette is offline  
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Split has recognized one definite piece of false news, in mentioning that
494 tons of coffee. The most highly priced commodity on the German black market, in that period, was coffee, which causes me to wonder why they would be exporting it to a country awash with it. The VW was not imported into North America until 1959-60, if memory serves and, while I spent some time in 52-53 in the great peat bog of Ostfriesland, I really do wonder if they were exporting any of it to the US. Since my time there was not spent studying the German export business, I could be wrong on all counts but,..............
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  #113  
Old 25th June 2018, 03:09
tsell tsell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barrie Youde View Post
Merchant ships carry freight, for profit. That is their purpose in life.

Nothing which Flying Enterprise might have been carrying diminishes- nor could begin to diminish - the courage and professionalism of Carlsen and Dancy.

Here in SN we have an account given by Tsell, who was not far away at the time.
Thanks for pointing that out, Barrie, however, I along with many others, including yourself, am convinced that these conspiracy theories will always be promoted for one reason or another.

Cheers,

Taff
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  #114  
Old 20th September 2018, 12:14
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Gijsha Gijsha is offline  
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Here a witness report about the possible cause of the instability of the Flying Enterprise:

"At the end of December 1951 the Flying Enterprise made a short stop in Rotterdam to pick up the last part of the cargo: 1200 tons of peak iron. It was a few days before the big storm, during which the ship would be fatally damaged.
Van der Wolf was inspector in the port of Rotterdam in 1951. He worked for the SVZ, the Shipping Association Zuid, which performed for large shipping companies such as Isbrandtsen (the owner of the Flying Enterprise). A port inspector monitors the ship and the arriving and coming crew members as long as the ship is in the harbor. But the most important task of the port inspector is to supervise the cargo.
On 24 December 1951 Van der Wolf checked the cargo of the Flying Enterprise. He was there when something dangerous went wrong. Van der Wolf: "The cargo of the Flying Enterprise consisted of peak iron, that is rough ore. While loading in the bottom hold there was no good view because it was so deep. Then the cargo was simply thrown at the gambling by the crew and the partitions were destroyed. "So the raw ore was unstressed in the hold. Since it was very heavy weather in this month of December this was very dangerous, according to Van der Wolf. "In a storm you get into big problems. Then you go diagonally with your ship and the load will shift and iron will absolutely not slide back. "Van der Wolf wanted to inform Captain Carlsen of this. "But because Carlsen was not approachable because of drunkenness, I went to the first mate. When I advised him not to sail because the ship was badly loaded, he ignored my advice. "
The crew wanted to sail quickly and that happened. A port inspector can give a strong advice, but has no authority to overturn a ship. Van der Wolf produced a report with the details as usual. In the report he mentioned both the bad way of loading and the drunkenness of Captain Carlsen. When the Flying Enterprise made it two days later, Van der Wolf was called to his superior. He was urged to keep his findings about the cargo of the Flying Enterprise and not to make his story public. Van der Wolf was not told what the consequences of making his story public would be, but according to him it is plausible that it would have meant his resignation. "It was the fifties, the jobs were not up for grabs, so I kept my mouth shut. And now it's fifty years later, after having heard that there was a broadcast about the Flying Enterprise I thought, I'll call about that anyway, because I do have problems with that whole thing. And that's how it happened and that's how it came ... "
The coastguard report that was drawn up after the Flying Enterprise was sunk, seems to confirm Van der Wolf's story: "The peak iron in hold number 2 was not evenly distributed, covered or otherwise secured and therefore there would be a danger slide. "
The full coastguard report can be found on the website http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-m/moa/board...enterprise.pdf (link not working anymore)
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  #115  
Old 21st September 2018, 05:34
LngChief78 LngChief78 is offline
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SS Exbrook

I sailed with Capt. Karlsen on the America Export Lines SS Exbrook as a USMMA Engine Cadet Midshipman. It was a trip from the US east coast to the Mediterranean over Christmas 1965.
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