Firing ship's galleys - Page 2 - Ships Nostalgia
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Firing ship's galleys

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  #26  
Old 30th January 2016, 06:45
Split Split is offline  
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I was apprentice on a "Fort" coal burner. It was the practice for the galleyboy to clean one stove every night and for the farmer to get it going in the early morning. Simply build up the existing coal stove and then, with a shovel, transfer the burning coals over to the other stove.
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  #27  
Old 3rd February 2016, 16:44
loco loco is offline
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Doesn't the classic 'Two Years Before The Mast' by RH Dana include a piece when he assists in crewing a boat to go 'wooding' or galley firewood in San Francisco Bay? Its a few years since I re-read this book, but I'm sure its mentioned-IIRC, they are frozen overnight in a drizzle, and nearly get swept out of the Bay.
I know it mentions going wooding when he was ashore in the hide house, but I can't remember if this wood collected was just for the hide house's own use, or whether it was also collected ready for the return of their ship.
Martyn
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  #28  
Old 17th January 2017, 15:28
barney b barney b is offline  
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Oil fired stoves

Sailed on small tanker in early sixties named Brodick,cook took evening/night off as we sailed from Preston back to Ellesmere port, I was catering boy and had to step in and cook evening meal for crew.We sailed into a gale bow on and the oil stove frightened the life out of me, every time the ship dived down in the seas the stove went out and as she came back up the stove exploded with flame out of top. I had no idea how to control it.Went to boat deck turned off the oil and we all had salad and sandwiches for tea.Never was asked to stand in for cook again.
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  #29  
Old 17th January 2017, 16:06
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Basil Basil is offline  
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These show the arrangement on The Mary Rose.

http://www.maryrose.org/meet-the-crew/the-cook/cooking/

http://www.maryrose.org/resources/lcity/image-map.htm
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File Type: jpg iso760.jpg (51.2 KB, 54 views)
File Type: jpg the-galley.jpg (61.8 KB, 63 views)
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  #30  
Old 17th January 2017, 18:59
Russ Lowdon Russ Lowdon is offline  
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Diesel oil fired galley

Elders & Fyffes's MV Zent (3rd) - 9 cyl B&W- was my first ship as a junior engineer.The galley was positioned athwartships between the two accommodation alleyways.and my cabin was at the end next to the galley.. it was diesel fired and I hadn't got my sea legs -did a lot of calling for Hughie that trip all the way from the Mersey to Las Palmas
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  #31  
Old 17th January 2017, 19:37
Michael Taylor Michael Taylor is offline  
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Am sure many of us that sailed in the late 50's early 60's with Indian crews remember the coal stoves that the Bandaries used, one either side for the firemen and sailors. It was our job as Apprentices to measure the coal remaining in the two bunkers so more could be ordered when in port. The Officers galley midships was similarly set up but much larger and was replaced long before that of the crew with an electric model.
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  #32  
Old 17th January 2017, 19:39
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Frank P Frank P is offline  
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When I was onboard the Mathias Reith built i 1954 we had an oil burning stove in the galley and it was job of the 4-8 watchman to light the stove and have it ready before he woke the cook, most of the time it fired up ok but you always had to check after a while that the stove fire was burning. During the first few days of me lighting the stove I forgot to check it and the flame had gone out, I woke up the cook as normal and then got a bollocking from the mate when the cook called the bridge because people were whinging that there was no hot food ready....

Cheers Frank
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  #33  
Old 21st January 2017, 01:23
narra narra is offline  
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Canadian Hi.As you can see at top of the page I was on the Speciality in 53 and had almost the same problem blew the stove up. All the best Narra. 4 one done.
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  #34  
Old 21st January 2017, 09:20
canadian canadian is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by narra View Post
Canadian Hi.As you can see at top of the page I was on the Speciality in 53 and had almost the same problem blew the stove up. All the best Narra. 4 one done.
All the best Narra, I was also aboard her (Speciality) In 59 as cabin boy first trip, Memories a little hazy, although fire free.

Regards Canadian.
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  #35  
Old 8th July 2017, 06:16
Dingogirl Dingogirl is offline
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Coal-fired ship's galleys at Ford Dundas, Melville Island, 1824-25

As many Australian members will know, HMS Tamar, Sir J. G. Bremer Commander, left Sydney for the northern coast of Australia to establish a new settlement at Melville Island. She was accompanied by the convict transport ship Countess of Harcourt, Bunn master, homeward bound to England via Calcutta, but contracted to accompany the Tamar, carrying convicts, troops and supplies. On 10 March 1825, the Australian newspaper carried a story about the new settlement of Fort Dundas and it included the following comment, author not identified but possibly an officer from HMS Tamar:

"Oct. 15 [1824].—This day a man found secreted in the hold of the transport, who stated he had been there ten weeks. His appearance was really heart rending. Greater part of the time he must have been in the coal-hole, which is as hot as an oven, and swarming with centipedes, and other vermin. He has since been recognized as Thomas Harris, a joiner."

This would indicate that the CofH had coal-fired galleys. Similarly, the 60-ton brig Lady Nelson, Johns master, also accompanied HMS Tamar and apart from her own supplies, she carried 60 tons of coal. It was expected that she would be on duty at Fort Dundas for several years as a supply vessel, scouting the islands for fresh livestock and vegetables for the new settlement. Again this suggests to me that coal-fired galleys were probably in widespread use by the early 19th century.
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  #36  
Old 26th July 2017, 15:48
ianrobson36 ianrobson36 is offline  
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What ever the stoves were I have always had good regard for the cooks who kept us fed, whatever the weather, I take my hat off to them.
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  #37  
Old 2nd August 2017, 08:15
david freeman david freeman is offline  
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one experience adrift for some 9/10 days without any power. The Chief steward utilized the er forge on the poop to cater for the whole crew some 55 persons [Indian Crew]- [fuel become a problem which was solved with ingenuity. He managed, and we ate fairly well as the cold rooms, could only be opened for limited periods [we were in the India Ocean off Bombay/Karachi some 5 days steaming to Bahrain, when power was resumed.]
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  #38  
Old 11th October 2017, 14:30
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lazyjohn lazyjohn is offline  
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On many sailing vessels, coal was the common fuel. Even HMS Victory seems to have had a coal fired range. Coal is heavier but more compact to store. A small supply would have been kept in a ready to use bin in the galley. The main supply, due to its mass, would have been ordered into the storage holds wherever the 1st lieutenant/chief mate decided. It may well have been stored (in sacks or bins)in several parcels as required for stability. Ease of access would have been taken into consideration as well. Wood fuel is also more of a fire risk (odd but true). Some (mainly)merchant ships also stored coal on deck. (Refs:- read Bird of Dawning, visit HMS Victory, visit Cutty Sark)
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  #39  
Old 16th November 2018, 06:37
Tony Magon Tony Magon is offline  
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At HMNZS Irirangi (Old camp) 5 miles south of Waiouru they used a diesel stove - Used to do our own cook ups on a Sunday

HMNZS Kiama and Inverell had diesel stoves as well apparently

Regards

Tony Magon - ex RNZN - Awarua, Chatham Islands, and Sydney Radio
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