WW2 Radio Officers' duties. - Ships Nostalgia
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WW2 Radio Officers' duties.

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  #1  
Old 15th July 2010, 16:10
Bob Murdoch Bob Murdoch is offline  
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WW2 Radio Officers' duties.

I may be a bit late in asking this, but can any of our WW2 Radio Officers give me a bit of info on the duties, apart from listening watch, they undertook.
I think that they also were called upon to do visual signal watch on the bridge in convoy. Is this correct?
Hope someone can assist
Thanks,
Bob
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  #2  
Old 15th July 2010, 18:35
Ivor Lloyd Ivor Lloyd is offline  
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R/O's

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Murdoch View Post
I may be a bit late in asking this, but can any of our WW2 Radio Officers give me a bit of info on the duties, apart from listening watch, they undertook.
I think that they also were called upon to do visual signal watch on the bridge in convoy. Is this correct?
Hope someone can assist
Thanks,
Bob
Bob
When I went to sea in1942 as a 3 R/O I kept the 0000-0400 & 1200-1600
Watch on the Bridge and handled all visual signals whilst in Convoy. A Duffel Coat was made available for the R/O to wear .

Ivor
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  #3  
Old 15th July 2010, 18:38
Ivor Lloyd Ivor Lloyd is offline  
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R/o

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Originally Posted by Ivor Lloyd View Post
Bob
When I went to sea in1942 as a 3 R/O I kept the 0000-0400 & 1200-1600
Watch on the Bridge and handled all visual signals whilst in Convoy. A Duffel Coat was made available for the R/O to wear .

Ivor
Sorry forgot to add that I was also a member of the 4.7" gun crew and thats another story..

Ivor
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  #4  
Old 16th July 2010, 00:33
Bernard McIver Bernard McIver is offline  
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Bob,

I echo Ivor's remarks about Bridge watch whilst in convoy. Not the preferred place during the winter of 1942/43. I remember we tried to relay the hoisted flag signal from the Commodore quicker than the other ships in our vicinity. That was our only "lighter" moment.

I spent two years on a Dutch ship sailing independently from American ports to the Pacific & Indian Oceans. Many long hours decoding messages, many of which were of no direct interest to us. Also produced a daily newsletter for the crew.
Bernard
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  #5  
Old 16th July 2010, 00:56
John Dryden John Dryden is offline  
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Two fascinating insights, Bernard,to your job on those ships.
JD
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  #6  
Old 16th July 2010, 03:42
teb teb is offline  
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Apart from keeping 12/4 watch as 3rdR/O was also called upon as No2 on Orlekon A/A Gun.
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  #7  
Old 16th July 2010, 11:17
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Ivor, Bernard, Teb,

I am sure that many of us would be interested in any stories and anecdotes about your duties during WW2. I am sure there are many you would rather not remember but some of the lighter moments would go down well.

Neville - Hawkey01
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  #8  
Old 16th July 2010, 11:46
Bob Murdoch Bob Murdoch is offline  
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Gentlemen,
Many thanks for your various responses. You have cleared up the bridge thing for me.
Like Hawkeye, I am sure that a lot of us on the site would welcome any of the lighter side of things too.
I have another query. I reealize that a as in peacetime, ROs worked for radio companies or were direct employed by shipping companies. However, who assigned the large number of newly qualified blokes coming in to take the 2nd and 3rd RO spots. Were they assigned by a central 'pool' like other seamen or did they have to find their own spot like peacetime?
Again thanks for the responses
Bob
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  #9  
Old 17th July 2010, 00:32
Bernard McIver Bernard McIver is offline  
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Bob,

In my case I was referred to the Radio Officer's Union in Liverpool who allocated a ship and drew up the contract. One problem facing many newly qualified Radio Officers was that they were still eligible for conscription until they had signed on their first ship. As the demand for R/O's fluctuated from time to time many found themselves in the Armed Forces, their new Certificate and in some cases new Uniform of no further use.

I was fortunate in getting my first posting just two weeks after qualifying and six weeks after my 18th birthday, due in no small part to a sympathetic Secretary of the Union looking kindly on my Father who was recovering from the sinking of his ship.

Regards,
Bernard
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  #10  
Old 20th July 2010, 09:01
Bob Murdoch Bob Murdoch is offline  
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Thanks for that Bernard.
Often wondered about that. Could just imagine Marconi licking its lips as the newly ticketed bods arrived at their door.
Yes, the armed service set up was weird. My eldest brother fimnished his time as a motor mechanic with Youngs, the local bus company, so trained on big engines (for the time) and hoped to get onto MTBs so as soon as his time was out he was up to Glasgow to sign on the RN. No, he was assigned to the Fleet Air Arm and re-trained as an airframe fitter. The guy who passed in with him at the same time was assigned to training as a mechanic -for MTBs. He was a trained cook. What happened to all the ideas of using manpower in its best position. Anyhow, it would probably have been safer in the army, than at sea as a RO
Thanks, Bob
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  #11  
Old 28th February 2019, 22:23
williamg williamg is offline  
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Just a possibility Bob but are you from Johnstone???
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