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  #1  
Old 5th April 2009, 18:52
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Over and out!

What was the most important radio message you had to make while serving as a ships radio officer.
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  #2  
Old 5th April 2009, 19:07
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Isn't Over and Out in-correct, I am no radio man but in the army we were taught its either OVER,while still talking, and OUT when you are finished with transmission,only Hollywood uses Over and Out. Not criticizing Dick just asking.

John.
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  #3  
Old 5th April 2009, 19:20
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Quite correct JR. Only used in films or some documentaries by non-maritime types. Have a look at various postings on this site under Wick Radio/GKR. Quite a few comments in there.
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  #4  
Old 5th April 2009, 19:27
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Well said John. Steam comes out of my ears whenever I hear "over and out". I taught comms in HM Coastguard and said either one or the other, but never both at the same time.
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  #5  
Old 5th April 2009, 19:29
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Quite right, Paul! What WOULD they say at the College of Knowledge??
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  #6  
Old 5th April 2009, 19:45
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Roger isn't technically correct either although everyone uses it in the affirmitive regardless. Of course this harks back to the days of dits and dahs when Sparkies used 'R' to indicate acknowledgement of a message.
However, the Australians teach it as 'Romeo' as that's the corresponding pronunciation for R and they get rather upset when you hint that it's perhaps a bit 'unmanly'....
Colonials, eh?
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Last edited by James_C; 5th April 2009 at 19:48..
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  #7  
Old 5th April 2009, 19:58
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Jim,another word we were taught not to use on army radios was "REPEAT",the correct words was "SAY AGAIN", "REPEAT" was used for artillery to rain all kinds of steel rain on your position,a hell of a pucker factor.

John.
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  #8  
Old 5th April 2009, 20:01
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Radio etiquette in spanish uses "cambio" (over) and "fuera" (out). The end of the message is always "cambio y fuera", over and out! Then again, I am an engineer and very radio "Un-Sabe"!
Rgds.
Dave
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  #9  
Old 5th April 2009, 20:17
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ROGER THAT? Oooops
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  #10  
Old 5th April 2009, 20:32
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John
Yes you and I sing from the same hymn sheet. There is no such word as repeat in maritime and aviation radio procedure.
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  #11  
Old 5th April 2009, 20:47
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Very true Paul,when your trained well you remember what you were taught and it remains with you forever.

John.
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  #12  
Old 5th April 2009, 20:49
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One of the common gaffe's I have noticed and, yes, I HAVE said it myself, is "Roger, that's received"!
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Old 5th April 2009, 20:52
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Exactly?
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  #14  
Old 5th April 2009, 21:00
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Interesting that not too many of us ex R/O's responded to this thread. I wonder why???.Cheers Pat.
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  #15  
Old 5th April 2009, 21:29
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"ROGER THAT" Pat.

John.
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  #16  
Old 6th April 2009, 03:42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James_C View Post
Roger isn't technically correct either although everyone uses it in the affirmitive regardless. Of course this harks back to the days of dits and dahs when Sparkies used 'R' to indicate acknowledgement of a message.
However, the Australians teach it as 'Romeo' as that's the corresponding pronunciation for R and they get rather upset when you hint that it's perhaps a bit 'unmanly'....
Colonials, eh?
"ROGER" comes form the oldtime phonetic alphabet "ABLE, BAKER," etc, as used in WW2 films. "ROMEO" is from the current phonetc alphabet for letter "R".

Perusal of a few posts about "Seaspeak", the simplified English for Marine use, imply that the current correct phrase is "Received".

Radio communications are in daily use at my workplace and the words "Roger" and "Copy that", are endemic, usually said in an American accent due their adoption from the DVDs which the users inhabit.

John T.
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  #17  
Old 6th April 2009, 04:01
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Thats a big 10/4 good buddy ...LOL
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  #18  
Old 6th April 2009, 08:38
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i take it then if your a Romeo you dont get Rogered,over and out
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  #19  
Old 6th April 2009, 08:53
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Qsl K
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  #20  
Old 6th April 2009, 12:19
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To get back to the original question...

"When am I due off?"

--------------------------
Re the maritime radio procedures:
While I appreciate the aim of standard procedures is to ease communciations, I remain to be convinced that the best use of them is exactly as per the book, which can lead to delays while people make sure that everything "looks and sounds correct". I think that procedures should serve as a guide and not be set in stone. Some comms and broadcasts during incidents sound so stilted and pompous that it makes your teeth grind! I have also heard comms - especially with foreign (sorry: people who do not have English as their first language) radio users- where the use of "correct" procedure is not understood and is not helping but is persisted with regardless of the outcome.

My own personal preference is to use the KISS technique in conjuction with well-known prowords (eg: over, out, say again, roger, etc). But you won't pass your exams this way, of course....

This is all in conjunction with speaking clearly, rhythmically and slowly; far too many people seem to feel that it is professional to speak in a quick, clipped, staccato manner.

As to cringe-making comms: my own bete noir is to hear someone announce that a broadcast will be made on eg vhf channels 23/84/86 and also on "MF 2226 kHz" or whatever - is that as opposed to HF 2226 or LF 2226 or what?

Rant over - my own radio comms are, of course, peerless and without fault (not).

Mimcoman
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  #21  
Old 6th April 2009, 12:28
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dom View Post
i take it then if your a Romeo you dont get Rogered,over and out
Well, it takes two to TANGO.

John T.
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  #22  
Old 6th April 2009, 12:46
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dom

indubitably
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  #23  
Old 6th April 2009, 17:49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James_C View Post
Roger isn't technically correct either although everyone uses it in the affirmitive regardless. Of course this harks back to the days of dits and dahs when Sparkies used 'R' to indicate acknowledgement of a message.
However, the Australians teach it as 'Romeo' as that's the corresponding pronunciation for R and they get rather upset when you hint that it's perhaps a bit 'unmanly'....
Colonials, eh?
Rodger remains technically correct in aviation terms to this day (Quote CAA CAP413) though as meaning: " 'I have received all your last transmission' Note: Under no circumstances to be used in reply to a question requiring a direct answer in the affirmative (AFFIRM) or negative NEGATIVE) "

Could be why its still used elsewhere.
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  #24  
Old 6th April 2009, 19:16
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"Do you copy"
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  #25  
Old 6th April 2009, 20:01
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Whe I did my GMDSS course we were told that for the voice that comes over the air as the easiest to understand phonetically is a high pitched voice with an Irish accent (or was the instructor taking the p...)
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