LASH ships - Page 2 - Ships Nostalgia
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LASH ships

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  #26  
Old 11th February 2006, 23:32
Andyroo Andyroo is offline  
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Lash Barges

The MV Spruce is a regular feeder vessel delivering Lash barges into the humber via a mother ship in Rotterdam
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  #27  
Old 12th February 2006, 00:10
Bruce Carson Bruce Carson is offline
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There are short explanations of both the "Lash" and the Lykes' "Seabee" systems about halfway down the following webpage:
http://tinyurl.com/a5fm3

Bruce C.
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  #28  
Old 12th February 2006, 00:17
muldonaich muldonaich is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by japottinger
Anyone have any good clear photos of LASH (Lighter Aboard Ship) in any guise. Some names Acadia Forest, Atlantic Forest, Lash Turkiye, Lash Espana, Thomas E. Cuffe, Golden Bear, Pacific Bear, Japan Bear, China Bear, Lash Hellas, Lash Portugal, Phillipine bear, Bilderdyk, Munchen (she disappeared with all hands) Some are now owned by US Navy.
i remember well the night the munchen went down we were only a hundred miles astern of her on gtv eurofreighter captain na mac donald turned the ship round i think she rolled 40degrees that night but the weather was so bad we could not make any headway25 hrs later he turned again andcarried on for greenock i can assure you nobody could have survived in the sea that night it left us all feeling very helpless , i sailed on asiafreighter years later we hit a freak wave mid atlantic lost containers gangway it ripped the foremast out of the deck we still went back for more every trip i wonder why????
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  #29  
Old 12th February 2006, 19:54
Jim S Jim S is offline   SN Supporter
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Thanks I am now better educated on the differences between Lash and Lykes Seebee barge systems

Jim S
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  #30  
Old 13th February 2006, 03:01
david david is offline
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Cool

I know this is a bit late, however I remember the Pacific Far East Lines 3 "Lash" ships were regular visitors to Sydney in the early 70's.The concept was not a success as it required a sophisticated inland river transport system( ie Mississippi-Ohio, or the Rhine) to be effective,in fact they were designed by naval architects in New Orleans. The Lash system was a failure on the LAX/SFO route to A'asia, PFEL went belly up (for a myriad of reasons) The 3 were purchased by American President Lines,converted to gearless box ships, renamed and ended up in the Matson fleet from 1996 where the serve as "Chief Gadao", "Lihue" and "Ewa".Lykes unloaded a lot of theirs + the Barge type to the Military Sealift Command who have a teriffic site http://www.msc.navy.mil/inventory of great pix of both types.

Last edited by david; 13th February 2006 at 03:08..
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  #31  
Old 28th May 2007, 14:16
rcawthra rcawthra is offline
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I have a large original water color of the Pacific Bear in port. It is quite nice. If you would like to see it please email me and I'll send a jpeg. Thanks,
rcawthra
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  #32  
Old 28th May 2007, 17:52
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I recall the PFEL LASH ships as being acquired by Farrell lines. Then Farrell went under, and I think APL bought them.
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  #33  
Old 2nd June 2007, 22:18
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Hugh Ferguson Hugh Ferguson is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by david View Post
I know this is a bit late, however I remember the Pacific Far East Lines 3 "Lash" ships were regular visitors to Sydney in the early 70's.The concept was not a success as it required a sophisticated inland river transport system( ie Mississippi-Ohio, or the Rhine) to be effective,in fact they were designed by naval architects in New Orleans. The Lash system was a failure on the LAX/SFO route to A'asia, PFEL went belly up (for a myriad of reasons) The 3 were purchased by American President Lines,converted to gearless box ships, renamed and ended up in the Matson fleet from 1996 where the serve as "Chief Gadao", "Lihue" and "Ewa".Lykes unloaded a lot of theirs + the Barge type to the Military Sealift Command who have a teriffic site http://www.msc.navy.mil/inventory of great pix of both types.
One of the Military Sealift Command L.A.S.H. ships came to anchor off Falmouth on her way back to the States after the Desert Storm war. I was surprised to get a call from a retired Admiral who lived in our village, wanting to know what on earth it was!! Having piloted several into the Medway and into the river berth off Royal Terrace Pier, Gravesend, I was able to enlighten him! I believe that they were the biggest cargo vessels in the world at that time. A remarkable concept.
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  #34  
Old 8th June 2007, 14:55
gcaptain.com gcaptain.com is offline  
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Smile My first ship!

The Cape Mohican was the first ship I sailed on after becoming a maritime officer. Here's a great photo of her:
http://gcaptain.com/maritime/forum/c...&page=1#Item_8
(at the bottom of the page)
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  #35  
Old 28th March 2008, 07:54
jim heslop jim heslop is offline  
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The company that i worked for used to discharge and load the lash barges at first the barges were made of steel with steel hatches But for some reason they changed them to Fibreglass and it was one of the fibregass one`s that was loaded with 4oo tons of coiled steel when it was in the process of been lifted on the ship that the bottom fell out
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  #36  
Old 30th October 2018, 09:11
SVAPSARA SVAPSARA is offline
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Hi, I am looking for images of these Pacific Far East Lines ships and came across your links. I can't seem to access the images via the Image Shack website. Would you mind posting here? Thanks for your help!
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  #37  
Old 30th October 2018, 11:08
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Frank P Frank P is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SVAPSARA View Post
Hi, I am looking for images of these Pacific Far East Lines ships and came across your links. I can't seem to access the images via the Image Shack website. Would you mind posting here? Thanks for your help!
I am sorry but Ruud passed away a couple of years ago.

Have you tried registering on the image shack site to gain access?

Frank
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  #38  
Old 30th October 2018, 15:30
Aberdonian Aberdonian is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trotterdotpom View Post
Pretty sure I saw Lash ships in Burnie, Tasmania, in the '80s (possibly Bear Line). I definitely saw them in Jeddah in the early '70s. they used to come in, drop off the barges, pick up the ones left from the previous trip and clear off. We were stuck there at anchor for ages - mind you, it wasn't all bad, lots of pistachios and (keep it under your hat) home made 'Sediki' ashore.

John T.
In the '70s Lash ships used to anchor off Dammam, Saudi Arabia, the barges being towed to the Small Craft Harbour for discharge. A German company Barge Container Overseas (BCO), contracted to the Port Authority, employed mainly ex London stevedores and Indian labour for cargo handling.

Keith

Last edited by Aberdonian; 30th October 2018 at 23:14..
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  #39  
Old 1st November 2018, 21:11
harry t. harry t. is offline
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http://www.shipspotting.com/gallery/...hp?lid=1412827
http://www.navsource.org/archives/09/13/131005.htm
http://global-mariner.com/index113PhotosOtherShips.html - scroll to 3rd down
https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/22362913229 - converted
http://www.shipsnostalgia.tv/action/...eas/?ref=harry t.
trusting these links help best regards
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Last edited by harry t.; 1st November 2018 at 21:17.. Reason: additional info
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  #40  
Old 3rd December 2018, 15:54
harry t. harry t. is offline
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http://www.shipspotting.com/gallery/...hp?lid=1729560

http://www.shipspotting.com/gallery/...php?lid=310395

http://www.shipspotting.com/gallery/search.php

https://fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ship/tak-2049.htm
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  #41  
Old 9th December 2018, 16:30
harry t. harry t. is offline
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A “bluewater-brownwater” transportation system that worked well for nearly 40 years. LASH, an acronym for Lighter Aboard Ship, was invented in 1967 and put into service two years later as a way to avoid port congestion, such as Vietnam. When introduced, it was a revolutionary innovation in shipping. From 1969 to the early 1980s, a total of 29 LASH ships entered service. LASH ships carried from 62 to 89 small barges that could be loaded with up to 375 tons of cargo apiece. They were equipped with a 500-ton gantry crane at the stern to lift/lower the barges, whereby, they could be taken to other ports on coastal or inland waterways. The ships could then sail without waiting for the barges. By 2007, the last LASH ship - the Rhine Forest - was heading for the breakers after its last voyage in December. The LASH concept was invented by New Orleans naval architect, Jerome Goldman. LASH worked best on trades that had extensive river systems or navigable shallow-draft waterways at each end. Besides the U.S. Gulf-North Europe trade, at various times ISC used it between the U.S. Gulf and Mideast and between the U.S. Gulf and Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent. The decision to end the service was purely an economic decision. Two ships are required for the service, and the cost of replacing 650 barges and two vessels didn’t make economic sense. It's wasn’t a question of the concept not working; just the replacement cost. The end of an era. In the early seventies three ocean tugs named after Scottish rivers each towed a “Flash” unit with a capacity of 16 barges each, working Central Gulf ships out of Singapore. They were joined by the tug ‘Mammoth Tiger’, 50 tons bollard pull, working a larger unit, the ‘Flash1V’ with a capacity of 29 barges. This unit was later converted, with a reduced capacity of 15 barges, motorised and renamed ‘Spruce’, trading mainly around NW Europe.
http://www.shipsnostalgia.tv/members...70/Lash_Ships/
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