Films at sea, early 60s - Page 2 - Ships Nostalgia
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Films at sea, early 60s

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  #26  
Old 23rd June 2019, 17:56
slick slick is offline  
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All,
I joined the R.F.A. in 1969 and found that our films were supplied by the R.N.F.C.
I remember one of the comments on the report sheet about "Gunfight at the OK Corral" it was described as 'a short range gunnery drama' and cartoons being referred to as 'Mickey Ducks".
Oh! Happy Days.
yours aye,
slick
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  #27  
Old 23rd June 2019, 18:20
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Harry Nicholson Harry Nicholson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Basil View Post
Posted this 10 years ago:
Departing the Carribbean eastbound with a cargo of bananas we had Dr No (of tarantula on Connery's chest fame) shown on a screen attached to the mizzen.
After dinner and accompanied by a can or two I watched the film and then turned in for a couple of hours before the middle watch. (Aahh luxury).
The Matina wasn't air conditioned so the ports were open and I only had a single sheet up to my waist (didn't want to frighten the fourth's junior).

Just as I nodded off I was abruptly catapulted to full wakefulness by SOMETHING scrabbling on my chest! I remained still and slowly reached back to my bedlight switch. Looking down the bunk, I clicked the light on only to see a tiny seabird attempting to stand on its little webbed feet

Lucky for birdy I hadn't taken immediate direct action so he got nest and board as far as the Azores where he was paid off - didn't want to go - recognised a cushy berth when he saw it.
A great memory! The tiny sea bird might have been a species of petrel, once known as Moither Cary's Chickens. They are ocean wanderers, only coming ashore to breed. What was his diet aboard ship?
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  #28  
Old 23rd June 2019, 20:52
david freeman david freeman is offline  
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BP Tankers were subscribers to WALPORT, and the bx of three films, usually an A film, and two B horse operas, there was more of John Waynes horse droppings on the main deck, than wet hankies shedding a tear for the story line.
Once seen the box of films would be exchanged, with visiting ships in the foreign ports, or the missions, where their was a WALPORT agreement.
With these films in the box were the safety films under the general title ''it should not happen at sea, safety features how to lash a ladder on deck or in an enclosed space, when working at a height. or the correct fire extinguisher to use from the ships equipment, and BP pere resistance 'FIRE DOWN BELOW'

Last edited by david freeman; 23rd June 2019 at 21:00..
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  #29  
Old 23rd June 2019, 21:24
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Walport still exist in Essex but they are purely a producer of safety films these days.

geoff
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  #30  
Old 24th June 2019, 10:17
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Originally Posted by Harry Nicholson View Post
A great memory! The tiny sea bird might have been a species of petrel, once known as Moither Cary's Chickens. They are ocean wanderers, only coming ashore to breed. What was his diet aboard ship?
Can't remember - probably bread and milk. With hindsight, probably unsuitable but no rum
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  #31  
Old 24th June 2019, 10:52
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Can't remember - probably bread and milk. With hindsight, probably unsuitable but no rum
A fascinating little bird. I recall watching them in St George's Channel - they seemed to tip-toe across the waves, picking up obscure bits and pieces.

This from the net re Storm Petrel (though yours may have been the Bermudan Petrel): The storm petrel nests in crevices and burrows, sometimes shared with other seabirds or rabbits, and lays a single white egg, usually on bare soil. The adults share the lengthy incubation and both feed the chick, which is not normally brooded after the first week. This bird is strongly migratory, spending the northern hemisphere winter mainly off the coasts of South Africa and Namibia, with some birds stopping in the seas adjoining West Africa, and a few remaining near their Mediterranean breeding islands. This petrel is strictly oceanic outside the breeding season. It feeds on small fish, squid and zooplankton while pattering on the sea's surface, and can find oily edible items by smell. The food is converted in the bird's stomach to an oily orange liquid which is regurgitated when the chick is fed. Although usually silent at sea, the storm petrel has a chattering call given by both members of a pair in their courtship flight, and the male has a purring song given from the breeding chamber.

The storm petrel cannot survive on islands where land mammals such as rats and cats have been introduced, and it suffers natural predation from gulls, skuas, owls and falcons. Although the population may be declining slightly, this petrel is classified by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as being of Least Concern due to its high total numbers. Its presence in rough weather at sea has led to various mariners' superstitions, and, by analogy, to its use as a symbol by revolutionary and anarchist groups.
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  #32  
Old 24th June 2019, 21:11
paddy mcdonnell paddy mcdonnell is offline  
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I remember watching a movie from the ship I was on,NZ Shipping Co, from an American naval ship in the next wharf over,we couldn't hear the dialogue, I think that was in Littleton. Paddy McDonnell
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  #33  
Old 25th June 2019, 06:12
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Loving these memories!
Re your previous post, I think the drawback of watching movies on deck in Murmansk would be the bloody iron ore that was everywhere!

As far as James Bond films were concerned, I remember swapping films with Russian ships and they loved 007. Can't remember watching any of the stuff they gave us in return, they were just considered a safety deposit, so we got ours back.

The Russkis sometimes suggested football matches and boxing matches to which the response was usually: "Why don't you just have a beer, Tovarich?"

John T
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  #34  
Old 25th June 2019, 08:32
George Bis George Bis is offline
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In 1975 in Ravenna, Italy on the Sugar Trader we were moored next to a Russian bulk carrier. Her crew turned out to be a friendly bunch and as they were not allowed ashore (Soviet era) we organised a football (wasn't easy to raise a team) After the game (we lost 2-0) they insisted we went back to their ship for refreshments. This consisted of liberal quantities of vodka and a film which showed WW2 from the Russian point of view. It was very interesting if one took to vodka slowly and I had a long talk with the Commisar. We were shown all over their ship but if I remember they were not allowed to come back to ours
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  #35  
Old 25th June 2019, 08:50
Bill.B Bill.B is offline  
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In 78 Fort Steele tied up alongside a Chinese vessel which was an ex P&O Strath boat. They were not allowed ashore and so we lent them our Walport boxes. In return they invited us aboard for dinner. The vessel had no air conditioning and we did. The meal was one of the best I have had but what really amazed me was that the ventilation onboard seemed to be every bit as good as ours. So much for progress.
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  #36  
Old 25th June 2019, 11:12
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Aud Schønemann scares the Americans.

In May 1968 I had no knowledge of the riots that took place in Paris. The street fighting between students and police that named my generation passed unnoticed by in the place where I spent themonth of May 1968. This was in Mombasa, specifically Kilindini harbour, where I served as an ordinary sailor aboard a war-built American standard ship belonging to NAL. There was a harbour strike in Mombasa and ships lay outside each other by the quay, and in clusters in the harbour basin. Most were, like us, merchant ships waiting to load and unload, but there was also a significant amount of naval vessels there. A large American troop transport ship on its way to Vietnam and its escort provided an electrically charged atmosphere. (Why did they not use the Suez –I do not know). Groups of healthy young farm boys with uncomfortable thoughts of possible premature death marched in sideways groups up and down the main street, looking for an opportunity to demonstrate toughness.

Which irritated a few Brits fromthe Royal Navy, who in the former colony were allowed to wear civillian clothes and whose numbers therefore were unknown to the Americans - but that is another story. It was something that did not concern us Norwegians much. Other things were more important. A great number of days in port had severely depleted our purchasing power. Most of us were now unable continue to down Tusker Beer and enjoy"shorttime", never mind "longtime foki foki" with the girls at Anchor and Sunshine bar, and that included me. So I gladly accepted the job as a night watchman when I was offered it, earning overtime money by sending them back on the quayside those who trundled aboard in mistaken belief that ours were their ship. There were not many ships ahead of us, just inside the gate lay a British “Empress” from which emanated distant cries of “Bingo” semingly 24 hours a day. Aft of her lay a black-hulled Welma Lykes, with damaged railings on the forecastle, and combs of running paint beneath the “LYKES LINE”. Maybe there were two three more ships ahead of us, but whatever the reason, I received a lot of disoriented visitors that had to be escorted off the ship.

Nearing midnight, a couple of Russians arrived, both sober, impeccably dressed, quiet and polite, for whom I immediately felt great sympathy. And when they asked for “showers”, I showed the two enemies of Western civilization our rows with shower faucets, deeply saddened by their lack of such amenities, and nearly crying at my own magnaminity. “No, no, shower officer, shower officer!” protested the two. Okay, so I found the first mate awake and handed the two to him.

The next thing that happened was that the face of Norwegian comedienne Aud Schønemann, fifteen meters times twenty, appeared in the middle of the harbour pool, accompanied by hysterical Russian laughter. They showed the film "Hurray for the Andersens" projected on the front edge of the midship house, and they did it every night, and with their laughter thundering over the water every time Schønemann appeared. The mate told me that when he understood that it was films they were after he had offered them "Billy the Kid" with Paul Newman, borrowed from the Lykes liner, but in this movie they were uninterested.

This nightly ”shower”went on the nerves of the Americans in naval uniform. I remember when a Russian ship, maybe it was the same one as our”shower” loving one, aimed to tie up outside an American warship.This resulted in some sort of alarm signal, “uunk, uunk, uunk through the loudspeakers on the American. And they now probably were certain that this spectacle was entirely staged by the KGB. At the destroyer right above us, an officer lay on his stomach on the deck and with big binoculars constantly aimed at "Mrs. Andersen's" appearances.

This story is not much of a story if you cannot visualize Kilindini harbour at night, absolutely propped with ships, and with the giant face of Schønemann with her rasping voice screaming in Norwegian and reverberating across the still water. But I will have to confess that the Russian reaction to the lady turned out to be less mysterious than I had thought. Many years later I learned that “Hurray for the “Andersens”, a story of simple folks battling the bureaucracy and winning, had been extremely popular in Russia, So they probably laughed at more than the mere face and voice of our Aud.
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Last edited by stein; 25th June 2019 at 19:45..
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  #37  
Old 25th June 2019, 20:41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stein View Post
Aud Schønemann scares the Americans.

In May 1968 I had no knowledge of the riots that took place in Paris. The street and unload, but there was also a significant amount of naval vessels there. A large American troop transport ship on its way to Vietnam and its escort provided an electrically charged atmosphere. (Why did they not use the Suez –I do not know). Groups of healthy young farm boys with uncomfortable thoughts of possible premature death marched in sideways groups up and down the main street, looking for an opportunity to demonstrate toughness.

.
Stein, in 1968 the Suez Canal was closed due to the Arab - Israeli war......

Cheers Frank
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  #38  
Old 26th June 2019, 05:41
stein stein is offline  
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I should have remembered that, or at least have had the sense to ask myself why we did not use it. But things are becoming increasingly less clear to me. By the way, it was not "Sjømannskirken" (the seamen's church) who distributed the films, but rather "Sjømannsvelferden" (the seamen's welfare office). The two cooperated of course, but I shudder when I consider what kind of films we would have been offered had it been the church who picked them.
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  #39  
Old 26th June 2019, 09:31
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Film delivery for the RFA ships in Singapore circa 1967. The tin boxes contain the Royal Naval Film Corporation movie reels. Some films very up to date at the time including James Bond ones. In later years down Falklands way the Polish fishing fleet loved to get a loan of JB films, probably very much frowned upon by the RNFC. Fresh fish was often received in lieu.
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  #40  
Old 26th June 2019, 18:46
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Basil, On the Matina I recall the very pleasant evening viewing under the stars with the screen on the mast aft. Being 2R/O and under way I never saw the whole film.

King, in '67 as 1R/O on the Rajula in Singapore I recall thinking I must be getting old when the junior R/O and Engineers showed a Jane Fonda movie three nights running in port.
Andrew
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  #41  
Old 26th June 2019, 21:38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stein View Post
I should have remembered that, or at least have had the sense to ask myself why we did not use it. But things are becoming increasingly less clear to me. By the way, it was not "Sjømannskirken" (the seamen's church) who distributed the films, but rather "Sjømannsvelferden" (the seamen's welfare office). The two cooperated of course, but I shudder when I consider what kind of films we would have been offered had it been the church who picked them.
Stein, thanks for reminding me, I had forgot about the "Sjømannsvelferden". I think that we used to have a one Krone deduction from our pay to go to them..

Cheers Frank

Last edited by Frank P; 26th June 2019 at 21:41..
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  #42  
Old 27th June 2019, 22:56
tom roberts tom roberts is offline  
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Only ship I saw films on was the Empire Halladale a trooper the screen was out on deck the only film I remember was a documentary of midget car racing show every night crap.
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  #43  
Old 27th June 2019, 23:36
Spearo Spearo is offline
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I recall stringing up a hatch cover between derricks and used as a screen for a projected movie shown at sea. (60's)
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  #44  
Old 28th June 2019, 00:01
Victor J. Croasdale Victor J. Croasdale is offline  
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Hi, I was in school in the 60s. In the late 60s one of the science teachers started the "Sixth form scientific film society". The title pretty much says it all. I became a projectionist at this. When I went to university, I went to the film society. As I could run a 16mm projector I was told that I was on the committee. We projected in a very large room and had no problems at all with image brightness.

We would rent movies that were only 3 or 4 years old as well as much older ones.

After university I went to sea with Denholms it was all Sony Umatic video players. Every time a starting air compressor kicked on, the frequency and volts would drop, the picture would go to crap and then return after a few seconds.

There were official policies about changing the videos but we'd swap with any other ship given half a chance.
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  #45  
Old 28th June 2019, 00:49
dannic dannic is offline  
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Originally Posted by Victor J. Croasdale View Post
Hi, I was in school in the 60s. In the late 60s one of the science teachers started the "Sixth form scientific film society". The title pretty much says it all. I became a projectionist at this. When I went to university, I went to the film society. As I could run a 16mm projector I was told that I was on the committee. We projected in a very large room and had no problems at all with image brightness.

We would rent movies that were only 3 or 4 years old as well as much older ones.

After university I went to sea with Denholms it was all Sony Umatic video players. Every time a starting air compressor kicked on, the frequency and volts would drop, the picture would go to crap and then return after a few seconds.

There were official policies about changing the videos but we'd swap with any other ship given half a chance.
Videos were supplied from office, about ten per month -- until it was noticed they were copied, illegally! Instructions were to ensure no pirate DVDs, etc were onboard when old video tapes had company logo on them!!
Dannic
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  #46  
Old 28th June 2019, 18:49
Victor J. Croasdale Victor J. Croasdale is offline  
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Hi Dannic.
DVDs came out in 1995. The video recording we had back when I was sea were more like stone age cave paintings.

The U-matic format came out in 1969 but was limited by cost to industrial and commercial users. The machines we had at sea were players only and would not record.

Domestic video recorders only came on the market while I was at sea. I bought my first one in September 1978, just after coming home from Singapore after 6 months on the Sig Ragne. It was identical to this one, except it was badged "Ferguson". It weighed a ton, being built on a steel chassis, with the mechanism being diecast aluminium.
Copying from U-matic to that would have resulted in really crap picture quality.
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  #47  
Old 28th June 2019, 22:33
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We had a video player/recorder on Barber Priam. One of the reel capstans broke and it was a "priority" job to machine a new one. Very successful. We must have watched "10" with Bo Derek over a dozen times!

On older ships, we had the film projector as above.

Films or videos, we used to look for known companies in port where maybe a mate was.

One famous episode was Port Elizabeth/Newark (New York) where I knew a couple of engineers on a Swire ship. Managed to exchange Carling Black Label ([email protected] medicine!) for Ozzie Swan, movies and a free bar to boot. Had to carry the 2R/O (Supersonic, Kevin Gaughan) back to the ship. Anyone know of Kevin, from Greasby?

Rgds.
Dave
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  #48  
Old 29th June 2019, 11:46
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We had Bell & Howell movie projectors on Elder Dempster ships and films were usually shown across No. 4 hatch. During one voyage the projector gave up the ghost and examination found a main gear wheel (made of plastic) had stripped all its teeth. It seemed no more movies for the rest of the voyage but on a whim I visited the Photographic department of the Kingsway in Lagos to see if they sold spares. Within minutes I had a new gear wheel which was installed by the Lecky and all was well with the world!
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  #49  
Old 30th June 2019, 15:07
George Bis George Bis is offline
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I read a book years ago on the operating and sinking of the Torry Canyon and apparently the crew got films to watch but these were only changed whenever the ship docked in San Pedro, LA.
I don't know if Union Oil were able to get films for Italian speakers, otherwise it was a great oppertunity for the crew to improve their English!
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  #50  
Old 30th June 2019, 16:48
david freeman david freeman is offline  
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i just wonder what is the problem is there one?
I have worked in my younger days for a shipping company of european management, managing many vessels under various flag states and in saying this, crews of various nationalities.
In the 60;s while at sea the red duster, and british registered shipping companies, I was only aware of white crew entrainment, and for this the film service offered by the Shipping Library service, run by the seamans educational society.
In my ignorance I am unaware if we had an asiactic/foriegn crew they were not issued with dedicated local language films: However they were invited to watch the as issued english language films.
I just wonder what the modern seafares welfare societies in the international ports of the world [Rotterdam-in europe] what they may now offer?
Further on a flagged ship in 2019 what are the off watch facilities for entertainment relaxation, with modern officers and crew being multinational in the truest sense of the word.
Is it all TV's and satellite services for tv and telephones?
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