How Many days to Cross the Pacific - Page 3 - Ships Nostalgia
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How Many days to Cross the Pacific

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  #51  
Old 8th December 2014, 17:04
marconiman marconiman is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by holland25 View Post
See posts 22 and 23,looks like she didn't get any better. David Street might have thought that Blue Star had sold him a pup.
Yes, that was the old lady, ex Saxon Star. D L Street ran her for 4 years before selling to Greek owners who promptly 'beached' her in the Black Sea. I did that last voyage of 12 months during '64/'65.

The previous one was 2 years 4 months, I was told the crew had the option of being flown home after 2 years, as in the articles, but they stayed. When you've been away that long what's another 4 months.

The voyages are documented in Capt Heaton's book, The story of a Deep Sea Tramp. I recall at the time I was aboard everyone said you could write a book about the experience and they have.
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  #52  
Old 21st August 2015, 18:30
p.g.gregory p.g.gregory is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ecb View Post
I was on the Port Nelson went through Suez to Cairns and then across from Sydney to The Panama Canal, we were Faily empty on way out, what would be the Approx passage time for both Directions I think it was about 17 days to Panama would that have been right?
ecb
I crossed on the R.M.S Rangatine, Panama/wellington which took 17 days. One stop, Pitcairn for a few hours.
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  #53  
Old 11th June 2016, 15:09
sternchallis sternchallis is offline
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Originally Posted by jimthehat View Post
maplebank and ettrick bank 35 days Panama to brisbane,and we could not afford to put a chart in the alley.
They always used to say about Bank Line ships was, 12,000 tons, 12 ton a day and 12 knots, perhaps.
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  #54  
Old 11th June 2016, 16:21
stehogg stehogg is offline  
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how many days to cross the pacific

Did it 4 times in two years on the Ulysees,21 days from Nagoya to Panama,but always remember the 1st crossing,took a little longer when losing a blade off the propellor half way across north of Hawaii.Slow steam to Pearl Harbour drydock them 12 days of heaven while the yanks replaced the damaged prop with the spare!!
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  #55  
Old 11th June 2016, 22:56
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jimthehat jimthehat is offline  
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Originally Posted by sternchallis View Post
They always used to say about Bank Line ships was, 12,000 tons, 12 ton a day and 12 knots, perhaps.
The maple bank was a ex Sam boat steam and 10 knots on a good day and approx7000t gross
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  #56  
Old 11th June 2016, 23:10
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BobClay BobClay is offline
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I remember crossing the Pacific from Panama to Auckland on a Bank Line Ship in the early 70's and it took us about three weeks. What I remember mostly about it is taking nav warnings about French Nuclear tests at the time, although I don't think they affected our track.
The other thing I remember is going onto the bridge each day and looking at our plot on the chart, which seemed to be moving with some sort of Einsteinien time dilation effect.
Queer the things that stay in your memory ....

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Last edited by BobClay; 11th June 2016 at 23:37..
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  #57  
Old 11th June 2016, 23:26
Aberdonian Aberdonian is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimthehat View Post
The maple bank was a ex Sam boat steam and 10 knots on a good day and approx7000t gross
The Tielbank, another Sam boat, crossed the Pacific from Nagasaki to New Plymouth NZ, via Nauru Island
a 5335 mile passage with a general average speed of 8.95 knots took 26 days.

Keith
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  #58  
Old 12th June 2016, 00:49
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BobClay BobClay is offline
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Oooops sorry, should have given more info. The ship was the Weybank, the year 1971.
We coasted around Kiwi discharging cargo ending up in Bluff. Then we went up to Fiji to load brown sugar for Liverpool. The trip from Fiji to Liverpool, (again via Panama) was about a month as I remember it, a bloody long month when you know you're going to pay off a Bank Boat (long trips were the norm in those days.)
You have to love General Cargo Ships, they carried just about anything that existed (except maybe for Dark Matter, and I've always figured Bank Line would have quoted for that one way or another) and went to all kinds of places.
Maybe it's me, but box boats just don't have the same appeal.
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Last edited by BobClay; 12th June 2016 at 01:30..
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  #59  
Old 12th June 2016, 01:27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by p.g.gregory View Post
I crossed on the R.M.S Rangatine, Panama/wellington which took 17 days. One stop, Pitcairn for a few hours.
Same ship ,same ports , same Pitcairn call October 1957 , 18 days

Bob
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Last edited by spongebob; 12th June 2016 at 01:33..
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  #60  
Old 12th June 2016, 04:54
tiachapman tiachapman is offline  
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It Seemed Foever
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  #61  
Old 12th June 2016, 07:33
Somerton Somerton is offline  
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On the Port Vindex in 1959 it was 33 days from Napier to Dunkirk through Panama and Curacoa for bunkers .
Alex .c .
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  #62  
Old 12th June 2016, 19:06
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funnelstays funnelstays is offline  
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l paid off the Cap Pamas in San Antonio Chile 14 th July 2014,flew to Hong Kong and joined the Monte Olivia on the 19th and departed Hong Kong to Manzanillo 25 days ecconomic speed.
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  #63  
Old 12th June 2016, 21:22
george e mitchell george e mitchell is offline  
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This is not about the pacific ocean which I had crossed many times in Shaw Savill vessels, I remember the fastest would have been the Megantic at about 16 days and the slowest was the Waiwera. (one engine at a time, many times.)
I had been standing by the building of the MSV THAROS in Hiroshima. JAPAN.
Upon completion I went on leave, and rejoined her in Singapore. She was registered in London as a ship. but was actually an oil rig without the drilling
equipment. Being too wide for the canals we had to go from Singapore to Tenereriffe via Indian and Atlantic oceans, with a short stop at Cape Town, for a crew change, we were self propelled with four 3000 hp azimuth propellers and 7 x 2000 hp diesel generators.the only two people who were not relieved was the Chief Engineer and myself 2nd eng. we then proceded to Tenerieffe. That part of the tow took 61 days. We also had tug assist, when we got 5 knots we would celebrate. the ships (rig ) main purpose was a floating hotel,350 people and well equipped work shops and heavy lift crane. a fire fighting capacity of two 3000 hp fire pumps. These were only used in anger once when the PIPER ALPHA was destroyed by fire with great loss of life in the north sea. I also did another tug assisted tow as Chief Engineer on an oil rig. she was Liberian registered. that tow was from Korea . via Capetown, this time I never got relieved till we arrived in English channel. I don't have the actual dates on this one close to 90 days. They gave me 3 weeks off before starting two on two off for the next twenty years, said a big NO to any more tows.She was also self propelled
regards George Mitchell
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  #64  
Old 12th June 2016, 21:30
george e mitchell george e mitchell is offline  
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This is not about the pacific ocean which I had crossed many times in Shaw Savill vessels, I remember the fastest would have been the Megantic at about 16 days and the slowest was the Waiwera. (one engine at a time, many times.)
I had been standing by the building of the MSV THAROS in Hiroshima. JAPAN.
Upon completion I went on leave, and rejoined her in Singapore. She was registered in London as a ship. but was actually an oil rig without the drilling
equipment. Being too wide for the canals we had to go from Singapore to Tenereriffe via Indian and Atlantic oceans, with a short stop at Cape Town, for a crew change, we were self propelled with four 3000 hp azimuth propellers and 7 x 2000 hp diesel generators.the only two people who were not relieved was the Chief Engineer and myself 2nd eng. we then proceded to Tenerieffe. That part of the tow took 61 days. We also had tug assist, when we got 5 knots we would celebrate. the ships (rig ) main purpose was a floating hotel,350 people and well equipped work shops and heavy lift crane. a fire fighting capacity of two 3000 hp fire pumps. These were only used in anger once when the PIPER ALPHA was destroyed by fire with great loss of life in the north sea. I also did another tug assisted tow as Chief Engineer on an oil rig. she was Liberian registered. that tow was from Korea . via Capetown, this time I never got relieved till we arrived in English channel. I don't have the actual dates on this one close to 90 days. They gave me 3 weeks off before starting two on two off for the next twenty years, said a big NO to any more tows.She was also self propelled
regards George Mitchell
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  #65  
Old 12th June 2016, 21:44
John Dryden John Dryden is offline  
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Aye,hope you got well paid for it George and had a few hours on deck.
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  #66  
Old 12th June 2016, 22:52
george e mitchell george e mitchell is offline  
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to John Dryden. I did get very well paid for that as I was being paid in American
Dollars, The exchange rate at that time was one dollar to the pound, Downside the top rate of income tax was 95 % in the 1970s The end of the voyage was late February and they paid my normal salary plus leave due in the month of march, I asked if it could be held over till the APRIL paycheck. They told me that was not possible I would have taken time off and get a tax rebate.
Irefused any more tows.
landing me with a tax bill of over 50OO for that month It also Ii included leave time while in shipyard. I challenged it. Was told because its registered as a British ship I had to pay the tax as I had not been out af the country for a year,
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  #67  
Old 13th June 2016, 20:14
graeme murray graeme murray is offline  
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Panama to Cairns.

Sailed Panama Canal after hitting Pacific side Lock Gate Chain on 23rd. September 1966. Sailed to and through (no stopping) Galapagos Islands. Arrived Cairns 20th October 1966. You do the math.

Ship ran aground entering Cairns (with Pilot Mr. Reed) Partially discharged Cargo of Phosphate. Berthed four days later. Arbitrarily, you can add this to the total number of days.

Ship: Baron Jedburgh. Budump, Budump (Doxford).

Graeme.
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