Merchant Navy Fare - merged threads - Page 25 - Ships Nostalgia
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Merchant Navy Fare - merged threads

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  #601  
Old 7th January 2011, 23:24
guinnessmick guinnessmick is offline  
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what about houlders deepsea i was on the swan river it was a great ship a good feeder and single birth accomadation we had steak twice a week sirloin on a wednesday filet on a sundayi had never known that before or since and them argentine filets where huge
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  #602  
Old 8th January 2011, 12:25
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kevjacko kevjacko is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andy60e View Post
I seem to remember curried corned beef and rice being served at breakfast on one of Denholms box boats...canny mind which one now......cook had been ex BP and said it was a staple of bp tankers
Nah Andy,

I'd dispute that. I did 8 years with BP in the 80's and I never saw or heard of it. We had to many other things to do with the dog, ie Stovies, panacalty, fritters, rissoles, sarnies, salads, steamed, baked, fried, roasted, you name it but never curried. LOL
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  #603  
Old 8th January 2011, 20:00
andy60e andy60e is offline  
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Aye, very versatile was corned dog....what would we do wothout it?

Maybe it was just a staple of that particular cooks ships then.....but he blamed BP for it...lol
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  #604  
Old 10th January 2011, 13:43
radioman1969 radioman1969 is offline  
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Smile Feeding

Seconded to Cory Line Dukesgarth/Monksgarth in 1976 for a few trips from Cunard.

'Hands up for soup' was the cry from the galley hatch and everybody that wanted soup obliged with a show of hands.

Same routine for main course.

'Do you want custard, Captain' ? - Yes please was the shouted response.

Fantastic grub, great bunch of blokes both crew/officers and great runs ashore/parties up the Lakes.

In Cunard, it would have been crisp white tunic clad waiters 'swanning around the dining room' and taking your orders.

'Would you like wine or water with your meal, sir ?'

In Cory's, it was beer with everything and you got it yourself !.

Happy days indeed.
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  #605  
Old 18th February 2011, 19:48
lawrence Croxford lawrence Croxford is offline  
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Originally Posted by R58484956 View Post
On Union Castle cargo we had a sunday night treat, egg surprise, but after 11 months the surprise bit wore off, egg surprise= one upturned apricot with white custard.
Chief steward bought barracuda and tried to pass it off as herring, but the 12/4 had seen them in the frig room and after a few beers mentioned this to CS, we had free issue beer for a longtime afterwards.
Egg suprise = 1/2 upturned apricot on a digestive biccy with white custard over,, first trip engineer although listed as a dessert on menu amazed all in the officers dining room by putting plenty of tomato sauce on cutting into it and shocked said "OH ITS a PEACH " result peels of laughter from everyone..Larry Croxford chief Cook BP retired..R 582413
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  #606  
Old 18th February 2011, 19:53
borderreiver borderreiver is offline  
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Lucky to have a digestive biccy commons just on top of creamed rice(just)
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  #607  
Old 7th July 2011, 00:36
john blythe john blythe is offline  
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dont mater what is cooked ! someone will mone
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  #608  
Old 14th July 2011, 12:53
julianne julianne is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lakercapt View Post
The list that was displayed on board ships was a copy of the ships agreement (articles) and that showed the minimum (chief stewards thought it was maximum) food allowances with permitted substitutes. Commanly know as your wack.
Not many went to these extremes but I all depended on whither the chief steward had enough saved to buy his retirement pub
board of trade regulations,on federal ship "cumberland" the galley boy was seasick for at least a week. crew were entitled to a minimum of 3 eggs a week,but the cook decided to give the boy some hard boiled eggs to calm his stomach,ate the "valuable "eggs,and went straight to the side and vomited,cook was furious,"bring those bloody eggs back!" gt
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  #609  
Old 20th September 2011, 14:50
john hardy john hardy is offline  
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been nearly 40 years since i was at sea, sailed for WHSN, Dagleish, Souters, Bowrings and Everards, every one a good feeder, this thread brings back many memories. my old man was a cook/steward from 1928-68, long time with ropners, 20 years with stevie clarkes. i can relate to MN feeding better than civvies, i was born in 1950 when we still had rationing, the old man used to supply the family with meat, butter etc. must have had to much on the ship eh?
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  #610  
Old 21st September 2011, 20:15
muldonaich muldonaich is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john hardy View Post
been nearly 40 years since i was at sea, sailed for WHSN, Dagleish, Souters, Bowrings and Everards, every one a good feeder, this thread brings back many memories. my old man was a cook/steward from 1928-68, long time with ropners, 20 years with stevie clarkes. i can relate to MN feeding better than civvies, i was born in 1950 when we still had rationing, the old man used to supply the family with meat, butter etc. must have had to much on the ship eh?
as an ex poor shipowner ill be at you door in the morning for my money for the stores lol kev
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  #611  
Old 22nd September 2011, 09:44
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Originally Posted by tell View Post
Shame on you chaps! no Apple Daddy, surely there must be someone from T&J Harrisons, Terry
Memories of Harrisons catering include seeing chilli con carne for breakfast also curry ,not a problem as obviously people were coming off watch and maybe wanted something more substantial.The chilli in the mid 60`s was a real novelty,I`d never seen it before,however it was baked beans instead of kidney and a water biscuit in place of tortilla.It stuck with me and when I became a Purser/Catering Officer later on,it became a good stop gap if something quick was needed.

I also remember a Chief Steward called Harry who when asked where the veg was to accompany the brown stew shouted into the saloon`It`s in the ******* stew`
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  #612  
Old 22nd September 2011, 09:55
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Originally Posted by Succour View Post
What a great thread. The two that spring to mind on Bluey's was Nasi Goreng, and Kedgeree. On Elder Dempsters Kumba we were asked if we would like to try Palm Oil Chop. We all declined the offer after seeing the Ch cook come out of the poop mixing the chop with his hands and a lady of the night hanging round his neck. Strange ship that Kumba. Opposed piston Doxford and steam recip auxiliaries, including the turning gear. 110 volts DC, and the lights used to dim when we showed a movie. West African stewards and engine room hands, boy could they swing a hammer in the crankcase, Happy days. all the best lads Succour
I sailed on the Kohima in 1966 as Cadet Purser,a liner split off the Escravas Bar and everybody had to turn to and lend a hand having installed the spare we set off up the creeks having loaded another liner went so we called into Freetown and an engineer flew out from the uk and repaired the split.K boats,no a/c,ice water from a chained tap in the pantry only allowed about an hour a day and my lovely mohair suit going mouldy in the wardrobe,african grey parrots everywhere for 5(with cage),final blow the steering ram went in terrible weather in Biscay and went into Vigo for repairs.Happy days eh?
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  #613  
Old 22nd September 2011, 10:23
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lakercapt View Post
The list that was displayed on board ships was a copy of the ships agreement (articles) and that showed the minimum (chief stewards thought it was maximum) food allowances with permitted substitutes. Commanly know as your wack.
Not many went to these extremes but I all depended on whither the chief steward had enough saved to buy his retirement pub
Oh come on Lakercapt,by the time you consider the Mates dunnage,water and assorted back handers,the Chief Engineers bunker commission and the Old Mans exchange rate fiddles on crew cash advances and share of everyones baksheesh the Chief Steward was very low on the horizon when it came to the black market.
yours from my retirement pub,
Al
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  #614  
Old 22nd September 2011, 10:28
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Ray Mac Ray Mac is offline  
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Those Brown Envelopes again, mind dinna have a pub!!!!.

Ray
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  #615  
Old 22nd September 2011, 10:56
WilliamH WilliamH is offline  
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Alan Ward I was on the Kohima from 20th July 1965 until 1st March 1966, you must have joined after I left. It was a happy ship though the work was hard
and conditions were as you described them. The purser while I was there was called Sadler, I can't remember his christian name, I heard he later married an Italian girl, he met while the ship was in Genoa, I remember my wife and I were invited to the girl's parents apartment to meet her parents, it was quite a "posh" apartment if I remember correctly.
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  #616  
Old 22nd September 2011, 14:53
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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I joined in the autumn of 66 after that familiar first trip on a mail boat,in my case the Accra.Don Cadman said of me`You got bolshy from mixing with the junior engineers but you`re a good human being`Unlike many of the rather`scholarly`Cadet Pursers I had been brought up in a MN family and always wanted to go away,first attending Riversdale as a radio student but the commute from Birkdale to Aigburth combined with my discovering teenage girls conspired aainst me and before I knew it I was tallying bales of rubber and enormous logs in Calabar,Warri,Sapele and Burutu!not at all what I expected.the Purser was one Peter Scott from Meols,he didn`t like work much and having a subordinate made his day.When I meet someone who is bone idle I mentally compare them to Pete,no-one has ever come close.The Sparkie was called Coulson known universally as Callsign.After Kohima,which would keep on breaking down I did 2 trips on the Owerri which were tremendous fun and the start of my finally learning how to behave as a man and a seaman,I left and my seaoing life really began.Fond memories though but what a very old fashioned company ED`s were back then,stuck in a 50`s timewarp
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  #617  
Old 22nd September 2011, 15:02
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R798780 View Post
Les produced what, for us in Brocklebanks, was the definitive list of curries. Regional and other names with the list of main ingredients. I saw one once, in the days before photocopiers so never got a proper copy, and long regretted that ommission.
That was probably copied and passed around,now somewhere I have one in my old menu/souvenir files if I can find it i`ll post it for you
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  #618  
Old 22nd September 2011, 15:22
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Originally Posted by andysk View Post
Aaaah !

Kromeskis a la Russe

Pigs in Blankets

Clan Line Spew aka sandwich spread

Connyonnie (sp ?)

One egg a day, and picking the lock on the galley doors for more to hard boil in the bridge kettle at night.

Being on Hector Heron away from the usual routes meaning an (almost) unlimited feeding rate.

Watching the PCO, out of his brain one lunchtime, go face first into the tomato soup, then stagger off to his cabin with his shorts on back to front (how he achieved that nobody ever found out !) He was a good feeder though !

Aaah ! memories
This website is ensuring I don`t do any work at all today.I was once told a story about when Cayzer Irvine took over the King Line and a Catering Superintendent was explainin to some old shell-back chief steward all about Slop Chest,Inventory and Catering Account Books he handed them over to the old boy and when the vessel returned some months later asked him`Have you got your books for me?``Yes he replied they`re where you left them on my day bed`I knew many PCO`s all combined by one thing,they ALL loved a drink.I blame Alec Bannerman from the Clan Menzies for my downfall
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  #619  
Old 22nd September 2011, 15:23
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Originally Posted by Peter (Pat) Baker View Post
I still remember (with fondness) a breakfast dish which consisted of chopped up kidney in a rich brown sauce served on fried bread.

I have tried for years to order it in whilst eating out, asking chefs if they had a name for it, and trying to find a recipe.

Can anybody out there help? An ex Harrison Chief Steward or Chief Cook could probabaly help.

Peter (Pat) Baker.
Kidney Turbigo?
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  #620  
Old 22nd September 2011, 15:52
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Originally Posted by tunatownshipwreck View Post
Galloping Gourmet was also carried on US tv in 1970 and later. He toned down his humor as he got more religious and the show got dropped by most tv stations. He came back with a more sedate cooking show called "Take Kerr" around 1980. A few years ago he was doing something more like the old Galloping Gourmet.
I remember him,at the end of his show he would taste the food and a look would come over face as if he was being s=====ed off by a Yokohama Hooker just out of camera shot
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  #621  
Old 22nd September 2011, 16:03
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Originally Posted by ALAN TYLER View Post
I also had this cookery book when I took my ticket in 1968, unfortunately it was never returned after I lent it to a 2nd cook. It was a very good cookbook, I wonder where mine ended up!!!
Having a drink with a mate I mentioned Repertoire de la Cuisine,a chefs printed notebook (you have to know how to cook already to use it,it`s like an aide memoire as we classical trained chefs say!)Well he was so classy he nicked it!Years later I joined the Clan Malcolm as AP/CO opened my desk drawer,I had a little cubbyhole of my own in the Pursers Office,and found my book still with my mates name in it the cheeky sod.
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  #622  
Old 22nd September 2011, 16:08
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Originally Posted by degsy View Post
Hi Brian I never sailed on the passenger boats, and did'nt get away to sea till 1969. Is Sadie you talk of did she work in Caledonian an alehouse on Lime Street in the sixties long gone now if its the same guy she also worked in the Big House (Vines)
Sadie did indeed work in the Big House
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  #623  
Old 22nd September 2011, 16:18
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Originally Posted by sinbadbooth View Post
John, I believe we sailed together as 2nd & 3rd Mate on NAESS TALISMAN (Capt. George Paton) 1967-8. A Panamax Bulkcarrier, worldwide trading, wonderful. I retired 7.6.2010 as Marine Superintendent at one of Libya's main oil & gas exporting Terminals. Talking about food! I joined my 1st ship in 1962, a P.& O. cargo ship, a seperate menu for each meal, probably 7 courses, but the number of different names that could be given to similar types, for example of cooked potatoes, always surprised me. The food on NAESS TALISMAN was not very good but on my next ship, NAESS SOVEREIGN, it was good. I served on ARISAIG & CRINAN. The food & life on modern oiltankers, and no doubt most other ships is pretty awful. Regards David Booth.
would that be George Paton from Anlaby Hull by any chance?
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  #624  
Old 22nd September 2011, 18:30
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Merchant Navy Fare

Alan Ward,

I'm sorry for the delay, but I have only just read your reply
to my query about Harrisons chopped kidney in gravy.

The name was definitely not kidney turbigo.

After all these years I am wondering if this was served
in Palm Line rather than Harrisons.

The thing is that nobody else seems to remember it,
which makes me think I may have dreamed it.

Were you in Harrisons after your ventures into the
joys of the West Coast?

If so when and what ships if you will pardon my nosiness.

Cheers and best regards,

Peter (Pat) Baker
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  #625  
Old 23rd September 2011, 00:39
TonyAllen TonyAllen is offline  
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Pat its funny you mentioned kidneys,I have never liked it but my wife made a big frying pan full the day before yesterday for her evening meal, and 3 plastic containers for the freezer,she called it Kidneys and freb Tony
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