Social & Cultural Revelution of Mao tse Tung - Page 2 - Ships Nostalgia
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Social & Cultural Revelution of Mao tse Tung

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  #26  
Old 22nd March 2007, 23:42
Hague Hague is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by makko View Post
Probably was, if it was the same Master, as this was the last voyage of the Phrontis (ex-Pembrokeshire) for OTT. We were laid up in Singapore pending sale of the vessel. I joined Antwerp 26-12-81 and signed off Singapore end 02-82.

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Dave
Probably was as he was a senior Ch.Off ('P' boat) when I sailed with him around 64/65 which implied he was around 45. Command did not come early in 'The China' unless you were destined for a shore job when you were given a 'token' command of 'Tantalus', 'Talthybius' or some victory. Even then you were 39/40.
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  #27  
Old 23rd March 2007, 01:15
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BF were famous for Dead Mens shoes. 4E twenties, 3E thirties, 2E forties and CE fifties and retirement! Although there were exceptions, especially for shoreside jobs, they would give the guy a trip as 2E for example to keep his credentials up. On the other hand there were the bad boys, kept as fourths or thirds to keep them in line. However, was a great company - I was third generation. My Grandfather was a bosun (sunk twice and inerned Milag Nord), my father and me engineers.

regards,

Dave
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  #28  
Old 23rd March 2007, 08:04
DURANGO DURANGO is offline  
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Originally Posted by rothesian View Post
Been raking my memory - I think the ship was the Perseus around 1967/68
I sailed with J C Rae when he was mate on the Maron 1964
I was A.B. in the Perseus in 62 on the Japan express service, got into Blue funnel by chance as i come from London , i paid off sick in Shanghai from an old tramp in jan 62 spent a month in the seamans hospital, from the ward you could see the docks and the famous A.H. on the dock shed roofs , great shipping company sadly all now long gone .
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  #29  
Old 23rd March 2007, 08:05
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Originally Posted by makko View Post
BF were famous for Dead Mens shoes. 4E twenties, 3E thirties, 2E forties and CE fifties and retirement! Although there were exceptions, especially for shoreside jobs, they would give the guy a trip as 2E for example to keep his credentials up. On the other hand there were the bad boys, kept as fourths or thirds to keep them in line. However, was a great company - I was third generation. My Grandfather was a bosun (sunk twice and inerned Milag Nord), my father and me engineers.

regards,

Dave
You must be very proud Dave. Blue Funnel Bosuns were legendary and respected throughout the British Merchant Navy as such. Very few achieved this rank less than 45 and then only if they were destined for the shore gang.
I sailed with Paddy Proctor, Joe Cavanagh, Jack Cleary and also the younger generation like Angus Cummins, Vic Blower .
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  #30  
Old 24th March 2007, 10:50
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Sad to think of the decline in the'China Boats'. Remember so many able officers quite happy to hold on th the belief that times would never change and content with the unbelievably slow promotion. Unfortunately, too many Chief Officers I actually sailed with never saw command in the company. Fortunately, I saw the 'writing on the wall' in 67 and went elsewhere. But saying that, the training offered initially in the Odyssey Works (OB & Co) and then at sea amongst the finest Bosuns and ABs the the British Merchant Navy could muster was second to none. Later, on entering the world of 'Knives,forks and tea cups' the officers were also of a caliber unlike I found elsewhere.
Brgds
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  #31  
Old 24th March 2007, 17:22
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Originally Posted by Hague View Post
Sad to think of the decline in the'China Boats'. Remember so many able officers quite happy to hold on th the belief that times would never change and content with the unbelievably slow promotion. Unfortunately, too many Chief Officers I actually sailed with never saw command in the company. Fortunately, I saw the 'writing on the wall' in 67 and went elsewhere. But saying that, the training offered initially in the Odyssey Works (OB & Co) and then at sea amongst the finest Bosuns and ABs the the British Merchant Navy could muster was second to none. Later, on entering the world of 'Knives,forks and tea cups' the officers were also of a caliber unlike I found elsewhere.
Brgds
Quite true Hague. It was drummed into us as Cadets that we were Officers with all that it entails! There was no snobbery about it, you understood what was required of you and what was expected of you. On the Barber Blue Sea run, there were many times visitors from HO in New York and I think that they got a kick from coming on board. On one memorable occasion, they had the Middys with white gloves and the bosun piped them aboard! It was "authentic" and spoke reams about the company and values! During my cadetship, Eng Cadets were moved over to Iliad House. Meal times in the dining room were with ship´s silver and full service. The menu was designed to replicate the typical two or three mains etc on board.

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Dave
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  #32  
Old 24th March 2007, 19:17
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Cant imagine the 'Bangor Bull' or any of the other bosun's I sailed with piping anyone on board.Believe me Bosuns in BF were real VIPs ?
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  #33  
Old 24th March 2007, 19:37
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Cant imagine the 'Bangor Bull' or any of the other bosun's I sailed with piping anyone on board.Believe me Bosuns in BF were real VIPs ?
And quite rightly so Les, they didn't come any better.
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  #34  
Old 28th March 2007, 16:13
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Locked up at Shanghai

Apart from the 2nd Mate, there was also an Blue Funnel A.B. arrested in Shanghai, for (whilst drunk) drawing a pair of 'B_____'s (testacles) on a poster picture of Mao. He had to face a 'kangaroo' court and was sentenced to 2 years hard labour. He was a Welsh lad, and used to work on the Holyhead ferries. As far as I know he still lives in Holyhead.
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  #35  
Old 5th April 2007, 17:01
Geoff Bray Geoff Bray is offline  
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Chairman Mao
I have just returned from a trip to Beijing and you may all be interested to know that Mao's Tomb was closed until September for renovation. it appears that his body is deteriorating in his glass coffin,(they lower him into a refrigerator every night and raise him up every morning) Which you can only view from about 150 feet away, and that they may replace him with a plastic model. More like Disneyworld every day
They are busy getting ready for the Olympic Games
Best Regards
Geoff Bray
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  #36  
Old 6th April 2007, 15:54
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Do they still wear those blue boiler suits Geoff
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  #37  
Old 6th April 2007, 21:08
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Ron Stringer Ron Stringer is offline
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Chairman Mao Suits

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Originally Posted by Eggo View Post
Do they still wear those blue boiler suits Geoff
No they wear much the same clothing as people do here. I was in China several times prior, and tight up to the Tian An Men upheavals and everyone was dressed in blue. Went back about 8 months later and for the young people mini skirts and jeans were the rule in the bigger cities. A year after that and you wouldn't have known if you were in Hong Kong or the PRC. Even important Party officials were wearing Western dress.

The bicycles that choked the streets have been replaced by cars (which also choke the streets but in addition choke the life out of you with their exhaust fumes).
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  #38  
Old 10th April 2007, 16:31
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Here's some mementoes.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Poster.jpg (48.2 KB, 40 views)
File Type: jpg Mao Badge.jpg (89.5 KB, 32 views)
File Type: jpg Red book.jpg (28.2 KB, 40 views)
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  #39  
Old 11th April 2007, 01:19
cboots cboots is offline  
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Ah, Mao's little red book, now that invokes some memories. I sailed quite a bit with Hong Kong crews in the early seventies when a lot of the troubles were going on. I always took a copy of the Chairman's thoughts along with me on voyages and would make a point of leaving it open on my desk when I went on watch. Provided one remembered to turn over the pages every day, it did wonders for crew relations.
CBoots
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  #40  
Old 16th April 2007, 15:24
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On one trip to Shanghai, one of our deck lads was soft-soaping the 'commissar' who was responsible for our ship. He was saying how wonderful communism was, and extolling the virtues of Chairman Mao. This chit-chat obviously conned the commissar because the commissar organised a coach to pick-up the lads and take them on a tour of some local factories. The mate & skipper were going mad because there were no crew on board to do the work, and there was nothing they could do about it.
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  #41  
Old 16th April 2007, 19:23
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Originally Posted by Sow-Sow-La View Post
On one trip to Shanghai, one of our deck lads was soft-soaping the 'commissar' who was responsible for our ship. He was saying how wonderful communism was, and extolling the virtues of Chairman Mao. This chit-chat obviously conned the commissar because the commissar organised a coach to pick-up the lads and take them on a tour of some local factories. The mate & skipper were going mad because there were no crew on board to do the work, and there was nothing they could do about it.
That could be a more appealing tour for seamen than it sounds like, if those factories have a female workforce.
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  #42  
Old 17th April 2007, 15:23
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In 1974 or there abouts the Great leader was still doing the things that were obviously falsified. Was a photo of him swimming in the Yangze River.
Still have the little red book that was given by those people that used to visit the ship for english lessons (a Scottish crew) must have been difficult for them. Tsingtoa was an ex German section and the visit to the brewery was great. Still did it the German way and was great beer. That and the shrimp in the freindship store were worth the visit ashore. Was very backward with limited eletrical power and at night was near black.
Had the soldiers roaming about the ship and on guard at the bow, stern and gangway.
Remembered we were all mustered in the crew mess while they searched the vessel and checked our "papers"
Good to see it over the stern and a few hours later were in Japan was as differant as night and day.
A great powerhouse now but I won't be going back.
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  #43  
Old 18th April 2007, 15:16
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Trevorw Trevorw is offline  
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When I was on "Glengarry" in 1958, we had to get the crew lists translated into Chinese characters in Hong Kong before we went to Shanghai and Tsingtao. The Chied Officer was called Mackenzie, and his name translated perfectly into three Chinese characters, "Ma Ken Zie"
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  #44  
Old 18th April 2007, 15:38
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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And they thought I wasn't listening....

The beer at the Friendship Store in Shanghai, about 1974, was called "Seagull" and was also made to a German recipe - top stuff, I drank enough to join the Chairman in the Yangtze if he'd asked.

I did a few of the trips to those Shanghai factories mentioned by Sow Sow La (is that a Cantonese name or what?). The star attraction was a "Commune" outside the city which was nothing like the dope ridden "communes" of Europe at the time. This was a massive self-contained community which traded its product of light bulbs with other necessities made by communes elsewhere in the country.

Our guide, dressed in blue suit and muddy wellies, took us to the "showpiece" hospital and showed us around. She disappeared through a door then quickly reappeared, saying: "That is the operating theatre, but they're not operating so no point going in there." What a huge disappointment that was. The banquet that they laid on for us wasn't a disappointment though - magnificent! Funnily enough, all the bigwigs of the place showed up for that. That is where I learned that the soup is the last course eaten in Chinese cuisine - I've had arguments with western Chinese about that!

I also made a quick visit to Peking from a port near Tiensing which I can't recall the name of ("Beijing" is up there with "Mumbai" to this "running dog western reactionary" - never happen). Tiensing had just experienced a massive earthquake and everyone was living outside, too scared to go back into the buildings. The Big Guy had just died and they were installing him in the crypt at Tiananmen Square, but he was too fresh for us to have a look. The trip was organised by the Seamen's Club and cost us the price of the petrol and entrance to attractions like the Forbidden City, the Zoo (must see pandas) and a couple of great meals - peanuts for a bunch of well heeled "Paper Tigers".

Recently I read that the body of Chairman Mao is becoming a bit of a health hazard and they're thinking of replacing it with a plastic replica. What a pity Airfix has gone bust, we could have all had one.

John T.

PS I just realised that I read about the plastic Mao on this thread - must try harder.

Last edited by trotterdotpom; 18th April 2007 at 15:56..
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  #45  
Old 19th April 2007, 23:11
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Red China

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Originally Posted by trotterdotpom View Post
Wasn't there a Blue Funnel or Glen Line Master locked up in China during those dark days?

John T.
I was on the "Astynax" in 1954 and the trip before I joined her the Master, Godfrey Brown, was locked up when he had to go ashore and bail out some of the crew who had been "naughty boys". The crew were released but poor old Godfrey was locked up.

He was a lovely man from Northern Ireland but because of this experience on the next trip to Shanghai there was no shore leave allowed. I can't remember how long he was locked up for, but it wasn't for long.

On a different note, I have never seen Taku Bar mentioned in this thread. It was an anchorage port in Northern China which I visited several times in the early 50's.

Trader
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  #46  
Old 20th April 2007, 06:45
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Originally Posted by Trader View Post
I was on the "Astynax" in 1954 and the trip before I joined her the Master, Godfrey Brown, was locked up when he had to go ashore and bail out some of the crew who had been "naughty boys". The crew were released but poor old Godfrey was locked up.

He was a lovely man from Northern Ireland but because of this experience on the next trip to Shanghai there was no shore leave allowed. I can't remember how long he was locked up for, but it wasn't for long.

On a different note, I have never seen Taku Bar mentioned in this thread. It was an anchorage port in Northern China which I visited several times in the early 50's.

Trader
That must have been one anguished crew, no chance to tour People's Factory Number 121, or a chance to read Chairman Mao's little black book with some comely comradette.
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  #47  
Old 20th April 2007, 07:35
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Originally Posted by Trader View Post
I was on the "Astynax" in 1954 and the trip before I joined her the Master, Godfrey Brown, was locked up when he had to go ashore and bail out some of the crew who had been "naughty boys". The crew were released but poor old Godfrey was locked up.

He was a lovely man from Northern Ireland but because of this experience on the next trip to Shanghai there was no shore leave allowed. I can't remember how long he was locked up for, but it wasn't for long.

On a different note, I have never seen Taku Bar mentioned in this thread. It was an anchorage port in Northern China which I visited several times in the early 50's.

Trader
Trader,
Taku Bar was the anchorage for Hsingkiang and I believe I have mentioned it in a previous thread along with Chingwangtao etc. Memories are that the mosquitos , if that is what they were, were enormous. Last there in 61
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  #48  
Old 21st May 2007, 01:58
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universalskipper universalskipper is offline  
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Was in Shanghai anchorage the day cultural revolution started as I saw the changing of white uniforms & peak caps to plain drabs with red armbands of pilot, immigrations & customs. Pointed shoes were bourgeois and so was rolling stones/beatles hairstyle. Saw the "light n taught a lesson in life" experiencing the extremity of people's deprivity/exploitation in both Communist China and Democratic India, tripping between these two. I suppose everybody has own conclusion to this. History changes just like the way seaman & ships do nowadays lol.

Last edited by universalskipper; 21st May 2007 at 02:11..
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  #49  
Old 16th June 2007, 17:15
Taleso Taleso is offline  
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Arrow See "Crews From China, 1960s-1970s" under Ben Line

Incredible stuff! The thread "Crews From China, 1960s-1970s" under Ben Line is in a similar vein but you guys were right in the thick of the Hong Wei Bing right enough!

Taleso
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  #50  
Old 17th June 2007, 17:55
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We went to Chingwangtao to load coal for Japan in Feruary 1950. The war in Korea was on, then, and we took the Chinese soldiers very seriously. They stood us out on deck and searched our cabins. All radios were locked up in the radio room. As a cadet, I was given the job of counting all the pills in the medicine locker and was warned by the Mate not to make any mistakes. I wondered what the British government could have, or would have, done to help us if we had run foul of the authorities of the day.

We were glad to get out of there.
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