Maskeliya and Maturata - Ships Nostalgia
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Maskeliya and Maturata

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  #1  
Old 21st May 2019, 17:24
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Maskeliya and Maturata

Am I correct in thinking that the amidships superstructure was built as
it was with cut down at after end down due to possible stability problems? I seem to recollect a posting that the GM was getting a bid dodgy when lightship. Any info would be most welcome.
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  #2  
Old 22nd May 2019, 17:25
Philthechill Philthechill is offline  
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Exclamation Do you mean----

-----immediately aft of the boat deck?

Wasn't that where the deep-tank was? I seem to remember loading that tank with "edible oil" from Ceylon in 1961. What a cargo that was with its finicky temperatures to keep it fluid but not 'scorched'. Then arriving back home in Winter------nightmare!!

"Maskelia" certainly was a bit 'tender' when coming out of the Verolme(?) drydock in Antwerp-----but then weren't ALL ships like that? Phil
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Old 22nd May 2019, 19:05
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Compare MASIRAH and MASKELIYA. Same class? I would suggest if there was a stability it was with the MASIRAH and the design was change to improve MASKELYIA? That makes sense. If there was a real stability problem, why not lower the wheelhouse... far too high!

Note the master's accommodation of MASKELYIA is extended forward. MASIRAH has a promenade around the front. MASKELYIA did but at some point rebuilding.

What about passenger accommodation? Did they carry passengers? Perhaps a decision not to have as many passengers or not to have as many as the other ships.

Not very helpful. No building information so can't compare.... apart from a couple of photos.

Stephen
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Old 22nd May 2019, 22:15
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I cannot answer the specifics relating to GM but I can say that having spent a year on Maturata and coasted Maskeliya in the winter they could certainly roll. More so than any other Brock's ship that I sailed on even when fully loaded.
Stephen, Maturata and Maskeliya were sisters but the Masirah class was built later and was larger. There was certainly no passenger accommodation on the Maturata and her sister and as far as I can remember there was nothing on the Masirah class either but I am much less familiar with them as I did not sail deep sea on that class.

Last edited by Tony Selman; 22nd May 2019 at 22:18..
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Old 22nd May 2019, 23:22
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Thanks Tony.

Well, that's that. Back to the drawing board!

Stephen
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Old 23rd May 2019, 07:54
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On the "Officer Deck" on "Makrana" there were 4 very posh double
passenger cabins on the Port Side. Stbd side was Second Mate for'd
down the ranks to Apprentices aft and the Port side had the Mate for'd then passenger cabins.


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Old 23rd May 2019, 08:49
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Went foreign twice on Mawana (which class was she?) including her maiden voyage in 1958. I've no recall of her being other than a decent ship in bad weather.
In my experience, the worst for rolling was Marwarri - my last ship - she was a terror. The 'inclinometer' (is that the word?) outside my cabin would click as the pointer hit the stops. Poor old Marwarri had bad rust - her plates were so thin that bunker oil dribbled down the hull. The 'chipping' was stopped in Calcutta - the hammers were penetrating the hull . . . The Superintendent flew out and ordered new plates fitted to the bows. When she rolled, the bulkheads in the stern corners the wireless room would part company and in came the rain. One clear night I got a glimpse of the stars through the gap. Arthur Orum supplied a stirrup pump so that we could clear the water from the motor cupboard - but it did not work . . . the washer had failed.
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Old 23rd May 2019, 17:47
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Maturata and Maskeliya were a class of their own; and had a smaller beam than the normal Brocks 63' 04". (Maipura, Matra Mahseer and Manaar were 72') As I understand they were tea trade specific by design - named after tea estates in Ceylon - but could never carry a cargo of tea alone because of their stability. They were tender to say the least. Altering course in the Red Sea when heading to bunker in Djibouti caused Maskeliya to list at least 5 degrees in flat calm conditions. Both times on that class, I did one trip on each as apprentice, they were loaded with a bottom of ore, manganese or kyanite, in a couple of holds prior to jute, gunnies and tea for the homeward trip (plus crushed bones, bales of rubber, manhole covers, and a vintage Rolls Royce on one trip). I don't recall hearing anything about the accommodation design being compromised to help the GM. Noel "Nobby" Grayson may have more info on that. The one well known change was the removal of the a/c winches at Maskeliya's No 4; the 1st a/c winches on British tonnage. They were replaced with the Clark Chapman Silent Steam.
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Old 23rd May 2019, 20:52
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I coasted on the Masirah, and as far as I recall there were few passenger cabins on upper deck. Reason I recall was during party times in Middleborough the "girls" used one as a changing room!
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Old 23rd May 2019, 20:54
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The two prototype AC winches were supplied by Clarke Chapman as a trial, apparently successful as Brocklebank went all AC with Mangla.
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  #11  
Old 23rd May 2019, 20:55
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Possibly the cut down upper deck were designed as such due to the lack of beam in comparison with others in the fleet.
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Old 24th May 2019, 12:09
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Quote:
Originally Posted by japottinger View Post
The two prototype AC winches were supplied by Clarke Chapman as a trial, apparently successful as Brocklebank went all AC with Mangla.
I did hear that someone had to stand by the contactor room at No 4 when working cargo to reset the breakers (or whatever) when they popped - a very frequent event from hearsay. Brocklebanks reverted to 220 DC and all steam winches before Mangla and Mathura were built a/c with electric winches. I had "fun" with my 50 c/s record player on Maturata and Maskeliya as they were 60 c/s.
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Old 25th May 2019, 06:38
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Masirah/Maskeliya

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen J. Card View Post
Compare MASIRAH and MASKELIYA. Same class? I would suggest if there was a stability it was with the MASIRAH and the design was change to improve MASKELYIA? That makes sense. If there was a real stability problem, why not lower the wheelhouse... far too high!

Note the master's accommodation of MASKELYIA is extended forward. MASIRAH has a promenade around the front. MASKELYIA did but at some point rebuilding.

What about passenger accommodation? Did they carry passengers? Perhaps a decision not to have as many passengers or not to have as many as the other ships.

Not very helpful. No building information so can't compare.... apart from a couple of photos.

Stephen
Hi Stephen

Masirah was the larger of the two.
Joined Maskeliya as 'fiver' December 1958. 2 voyages
With CE Ron Iliffe and 2nd George Snaith it was one of the best ships I sailed on in 17 years with the MN
No passenger acc. although I seem to recall an 'owner's' suite.
I also recall a young lady from Seychelles sailing home from UK that first voyage.
Quite amazing how the old 'grey matter' responds ... nothing to do with the young lady
Really what SN is all about, brilliant

Thanks guys
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  #14  
Old 25th May 2019, 09:30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen J. Card View Post
Compare MASIRAH and MASKELIYA. Same class?

Stephen
Totally different class. Maskeliya 470' loa; 57' beam: Masirah 497' loa; 63' 04" beam. Two level (stepped) boat deck on Maskeliya, single level on Masirah. The one similarity was the domed funnel which on Maskeliya from hearsay may have been a prototype for the Cunard Ivernia class passenger boats. Oh! and the bipod masts.
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Old 25th May 2019, 11:08
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The domed funnel design was earlier I believe. Tss OLYMPIA from Alex Stephen, 1953. The Cunarders had it from Brown's 1954. ARCADIA... 1953. NEVASSA and OXFORDSHIRE from 1955. BRITANNIA too! MASKELYIA 1954.

I would suggest ARCADIA had it first. Must have been popular... and worked well too. I knew FRANCONIA very well and never saw an oily smoke curing down the sides of the funnel... even when stopped or at sea.

Last edited by Stephen J. Card; 25th May 2019 at 11:19..
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