Bankline in the 50's.... - Page 20 - Ships Nostalgia
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Bankline in the 50's....

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  #476  
Old 30th May 2011, 16:52
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Alan Rawlinson Alan Rawlinson is offline
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Haircuts

In the 50's, the Sparky on the M.V. " IRISBANK " ( ' Boppy ' ) Bethel, who was a VERY independent character decided on what must have been one of the first Mohican haircuts. It was a cracker. The Master was a strict disciplinarian ( Capt.Palmer). The first meal in the saloon was a hoot, with everyone waiting for a reaction, but nothing particular happened. It made me realise, that Marconi sparkies could 'get away' with things that the rest of us could not.
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  #477  
Old 3rd July 2011, 08:32
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Alan Rawlinson Alan Rawlinson is offline
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engine characteristics - viewed from the top!

Switched over to the ' 50's ' with comments on engines as the " masters we've sailed with " thread got off course!

On reflection, am I right in thinking the engine I remember with the tough little bouncy springs on top were the twin screw B & W ones - ala Irisbank? The Doxford opposed piston engines I think had rubber bands flailing up and down with the top pistons - right?

I do realise this is a deck man showing his huge ignorance of all things mechanical, but what the heck. It was a long time ago. I hope it makes up for it to say that I for one was in awe of the beauty of the beast - thundering and thrashing, they were a sight to behold.
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  #478  
Old 3rd July 2011, 15:46
Joe C Joe C is offline  
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As another "deck man" I thought the main difference between the Moraybank (Doxford) and the Irisbank was that the Iris had two engines,one and a spare!
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  #479  
Old 4th July 2011, 11:07
McMorine McMorine is offline  
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Doxford Upper Pistons.

The "Rubber Bands" you are talking about, were the water and oil hoses, for the upper piston cooling, which occasionally used to rupture and thrash about, throwing water/oil all over the top platform and anyone who happened to be below.
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  #480  
Old 6th July 2011, 16:44
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Alan Rawlinson Alan Rawlinson is offline
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shipmates from long ago............

Thanks to SN and the bankline site, I have caught up with a few ' old ' (in both senses of the word) shipmates. Would like to claim a record, unless anyone can better it - now talking regularly to one Steve Cutlack who I last saw in Nov 1950, i.e. nearly 61 years ago! when we were apprentices together on the S S Hazelbank, clinker an all... There have been others - all power to the internet, I say.
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  #481  
Old 6th July 2011, 23:13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan Rawlinson View Post
Thanks to SN and the bankline site, I have caught up with a few ' old ' (in both senses of the word) shipmates. Would like to claim a record, unless anyone can better it - now talking regularly to one Steve Cutlack who I last saw in Nov 1950, i.e. nearly 61 years ago! when we were apprentices together on the S S Hazelbank, clinker an all... There have been others - all power to the internet, I say.
Alan.think that you can claim the record,tho we must have been at LNS together ,you as a senior getting the likes of me to spit and polish your boots and press the rings in your trousers.

Anyway anyone out there from Maplebank 52-54..
jim
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  #482  
Old 7th July 2011, 05:38
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Alan.think that you can claim the record,tho we must have been at LNS together ,you as a senior getting the likes of me to spit and polish your boots and press the rings in your trousers.

Anyway anyone out there from Maplebank 52-54..
jim
Hallo Jim,

The old brain must be going - or maybe its the booze, but have corrected the years to 1951 which was the year I left LNS ( Only 1 ahead of you) So I last saw Steve Cutlack only 60 years ago! We now both live in the rainforest - him in Cairns,Queensland, and me in the cold variety in Cornwall.

Haven't run across any old Maplebankers, except yourself when we must have passed on the gangway in Bromboro. In recent years I have been in touch with John Whiteside ( Liverpool) who was the mate on our trip, and also John Beale, who was my fellow apprentice, and now resides in Frinton.
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  #483  
Old 7th July 2011, 12:22
McMorine McMorine is offline  
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Bankline in the 50's

Anyone out there that sailed on the Westbank, September 1959 signed on at Bromborough and signed off in London April 1960. My first voyage. Skipper was Captain Ellarby, now no longer with us.
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  #484  
Old 7th July 2011, 16:53
Johnnietwocoats Johnnietwocoats is offline  
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Anyone out there that sailed on the Westbank, September 1959 signed on at Bromborough and signed off in London April 1960. My first voyage. Skipper was Captain Ellarby, now no longer with us.
I can let you know that Captain Ellerby's next ship was the Eastbank.
Also the 2nd Mate, Mr Arthurs, next ship was the Eastbank. July 1960 until July 1961.
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  #485  
Old 7th July 2011, 18:32
China hand China hand is offline  
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Anyone out there that sailed on the Westbank, September 1959 signed on at Bromborough and signed off in London April 1960. My first voyage. Skipper was Captain Ellarby, now no longer with us.
I joined her at Charlton buoys, London; 19 April 1960. Came out in one of Sergeants boats, my Dad came with me to the accom ladder, we looked up and I saw my first Seacunny. I asked who was that man with the beard: memorable quote from Dad " a man who has forgotten more about sailorising than you will ever learn, now get up there".
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  #486  
Old 7th July 2011, 18:51
Johnnietwocoats Johnnietwocoats is offline  
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I joined her at Charlton buoys, London; 19 April 1960. Came out in one of Sergeants boats, my Dad came with me to the accom ladder, we looked up and I saw my first Seacunny. I asked who was that man with the beard: memorable quote from Dad " a man who has forgotten more about sailorising than you will ever learn, now get up there".
I started writing a book a few years ago....before i was introduced to SN...

Here is my memory (Taken from my book) of joining my first Ship (Eastbank) in Rotterdam....

We were taken to the ship by boat and as I climbed up the Pilot ladder to the deck I saw one of the Indian crewmembers at the top ready to help. This was the first time I had ever seen a coloured person and as I climbed over the gunnels and stepped on the deck of a foreign going ship for the first time I was hit by the enormity of it all. The smell of the Copra was much more pungent and we were being buzzed by the infamous Copra Beetle. They were enormous and plentiful and as I was to learn later they got in everywhere. Even the bread baked on the ship had to be surveyed before you ate a slice to ensure that some had not been baked in the bread.
Everyone else seemed to know where to go but I had to led by David to the Boat Deck and then into the Apprentices cabin. David had his own Cabin as the senior Apprentice and I shared with Lefty. We had our own bathroom and Study room and it seemed to me that we were relatively well off. The transfer from one crew was very fast, as the Officers who were being relieved had to catch the night Ferry back to England. They had been on board for fourteen months and didn’t want to stay a minute longer. David went to see the Chief Officer and we were soon into our working gear and turned too. Again I was with David who took me round with him to the various parts of the ship and introduced me to the various crewmembers.
The 13th July 1960 was a day I learned a lot of new things. I was introduced to the first Moslem I had ever met. I also met a Sikh and a Hindu. I learned words like Serang, Tindall, Cassab, Seacunny, and Topaz. The Serang was the Bosun, the Tindall was the Bosun’s mate, the Cassab was the Lamp trimmer, and the Seacunny was the quartermaster and the Topaz the person who cleaned up after everybody. I learned later that he was a low caste member of Indian society and that was the job he would do for the rest of his life. Untouchable to some people. There was one on deck, one in the Engine room and one to clean up the crew’s quarters which were in the after part of the ship.
I had my first Curry and Rice meal. Curry was on the Menu every day and I learned to like it. I met my first Dutchman who was working on the ship as a longshoreman and I climbed my first mast. I also learned that as the junior Apprentice I was the lowest form of marine vegetation as Syd Mallory the Mate so aptly described me. He also told me that I was a Bogtrotter and that as I was Irish I was inferior to most other human beings who resided in the United Kingdom. I took most of this as a compliment and never let it bother me. I was so keen to do well that I never stopped asking questions.
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  #487  
Old 8th July 2011, 15:33
McMorine McMorine is offline  
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Originally Posted by China hand View Post
I joined her at Charlton buoys, London; 19 April 1960. Came out in one of Sergeants boats, my Dad came with me to the accom ladder, we looked up and I saw my first Seacunny. I asked who was that man with the beard: memorable quote from Dad " a man who has forgotten more about sailorising than you will ever learn, now get up there".
I9 April 1960 was the day I signed off, Disharge book is stamped Dock Street E.1. The Skipper then was Captain Williamson.
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  #488  
Old 8th July 2011, 18:30
China hand China hand is offline  
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I9 April 1960 was the day I signed off, Disharge book is stamped Dock Street E.1. The Skipper then was Captain Williamson.
Ja, mine also Alex. Was certainly the same day. We went from London to Hull where the deep sea Master, Capt. Ellarby, joined.
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  #489  
Old 8th July 2011, 23:31
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I9 April 1960 was the day I signed off, Disharge book is stamped Dock Street E.1. The Skipper then was Captain Williamson.
Was on the EASTBANK Aug 56- Nov 56 being sent home to sit for second mates Capt. mendus
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  #490  
Old 9th July 2011, 12:56
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Alan Rawlinson Alan Rawlinson is offline
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Was on the EASTBANK Aug 56- Nov 56 being sent home to sit for second mates Capt. mendus
Very fond memories of the Eastbank - 2/0 from June 58 to Feb 59 with Capt Barry Mitchell - round the world trip. C/O was John Hawkes ( RIP) Paid off in Newcastle, and relieved by 2/0 from Brentwood , Gordon Scott -Morris, who was later GM of the Port of Bristol - briefly.

Anyone remember him?

This trip was remarkable for me because I had the unusual and rather pleasant experience of shouldering most if not all of the navigation. Very satisfying. ( If you make the landfall, that is!). The Master would often make an appearance at noon, but soon retire to his quarters without completing noon sights. The Mate, for some reason, was contributing rarely with star sights, and the 3/0 as was often the case, was learning the ropes.

Would be interesting to hear if any other members had this experience?

Last edited by Alan Rawlinson; 9th July 2011 at 16:22.. Reason: more details
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  #491  
Old 5th August 2011, 17:05
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Alan Rawlinson Alan Rawlinson is offline
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Conjurs up the feeling - which is what it's all about.....

Don't know why, but the Eastbank figures in these threads greatly. I had a memorable trip in her as 2/0 circa 58/59. No problems and plenty of laughs coupled with a feeling of satisfaction and ' job well done '.

Maybe we should start an ' Eastbank ' club - I know Jim was in her ( to coin a phrase!)

On a completely different note, and as it's been a bit quiet on the Bank line site lately, I visited some of my chums company sites, and was shocked to see how little was the activity compared to our Bank Line section. Anyone in doubt, have a look at the BI site.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnietwocoats View Post
I started writing a book a few years ago....before i was introduced to SN...

Here is my memory (Taken from my book) of joining my first Ship (Eastbank) in Rotterdam....

We were taken to the ship by boat and as I climbed up the Pilot ladder to the deck I saw one of the Indian crewmembers at the top ready to help. This was the first time I had ever seen a coloured person and as I climbed over the gunnels and stepped on the deck of a foreign going ship for the first time I was hit by the enormity of it all. The smell of the Copra was much more pungent and we were being buzzed by the infamous Copra Beetle. They were enormous and plentiful and as I was to learn later they got in everywhere. Even the bread baked on the ship had to be surveyed before you ate a slice to ensure that some had not been baked in the bread.
Everyone else seemed to know where to go but I had to led by David to the Boat Deck and then into the Apprentices cabin. David had his own Cabin as the senior Apprentice and I shared with Lefty. We had our own bathroom and Study room and it seemed to me that we were relatively well off. The transfer from one crew was very fast, as the Officers who were being relieved had to catch the night Ferry back to England. They had been on board for fourteen months and didn’t want to stay a minute longer. David went to see the Chief Officer and we were soon into our working gear and turned too. Again I was with David who took me round with him to the various parts of the ship and introduced me to the various crewmembers.
The 13th July 1960 was a day I learned a lot of new things. I was introduced to the first Moslem I had ever met. I also met a Sikh and a Hindu. I learned words like Serang, Tindall, Cassab, Seacunny, and Topaz. The Serang was the Bosun, the Tindall was the Bosun’s mate, the Cassab was the Lamp trimmer, and the Seacunny was the quartermaster and the Topaz the person who cleaned up after everybody. I learned later that he was a low caste member of Indian society and that was the job he would do for the rest of his life. Untouchable to some people. There was one on deck, one in the Engine room and one to clean up the crew’s quarters which were in the after part of the ship.
I had my first Curry and Rice meal. Curry was on the Menu every day and I learned to like it. I met my first Dutchman who was working on the ship as a longshoreman and I climbed my first mast. I also learned that as the junior Apprentice I was the lowest form of marine vegetation as Syd Mallory the Mate so aptly described me. He also told me that I was a Bogtrotter and that as I was Irish I was inferior to most other human beings who resided in the United Kingdom. I took most of this as a compliment and never let it bother me. I was so keen to do well that I never stopped asking questions.

Last edited by Alan Rawlinson; 5th August 2011 at 17:07..
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  #492  
Old 27th November 2011, 11:23
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Nauru in the 50's

Here's a snap of the c/o - John Whiteside, diving from the bridge wing of the Maplebank at Nauru during loading in 1957. It's just asking for a caption!
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  #493  
Old 3rd December 2011, 17:18
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The old " Forresbank" burning

Here's a dramatic picture of the Forresbank burning and about to strand on the S African coast The subsequent enquiry determined that the lid to the oil settling tank had been left off, which caused an overflow on to the hot manifold below, and causing the loss of the ship in 1958. ( Kindly provided by the 2/0 at the time - John Beale)
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  #494  
Old 3rd December 2011, 19:26
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Originally Posted by Alan Rawlinson View Post
Here's a dramatic picture of the Forresbank burning and about to strand on the S African coast The subsequent enquiry determined that the lid to the oil settling tank had been left off, which caused an overflow on to the hot manifold below, and causing the loss of the ship in 1958. ( Kindly provided by the 2/0 at the time - John Beale)
Alan,that is nearly what happened on the maplebank off new orleans in oct 1952 with the addition that the crew had put their dobi on the rails in the fiddley and they had fallen on to the manifold and then the oil from the settling tank completed the picture ,lucky we were only a few hours away from the port fire boats which came to our rescue,but at least we got a couple of weeks in Todd Johnson drydock and had a ball on one months wages£5.16 8.
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  #495  
Old 3rd December 2011, 20:15
rcraig rcraig is offline  
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In an earlier thread it was said that the apprentices on the "Eastbank" had a study room. Where? Can't remember it. Did I spend two years on her and miss it...? Did dementia come in that early?
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  #496  
Old 3rd December 2011, 23:32
Johnnietwocoats Johnnietwocoats is offline  
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In an earlier thread it was said that the apprentices on the "Eastbank" had a study room. Where? Can't remember it. Did I spend two years on her and miss it...? Did dementia come in that early?
I spent a year on her 60 to 61..

I believe that the Study Room was right next door and forward of the Apprentices Two berth Cabin on the Starboard side on the Boat Deck..

The Washroom was on that side as well

The senior Apprentice's cabin was on the Port Side...

Hope my memory is good....
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  #497  
Old 4th December 2011, 10:09
IRW IRW is offline  
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The 'Study Rooms' as I remember them used to be full of ullage tapes and oil thermometers as well as various stencils plus other gear. Iain Wemyss
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  #498  
Old 5th December 2011, 07:40
Ian Harrod Ian Harrod is offline  
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The 'Study Rooms' as I remember them used to be full of ullage tapes and oil thermometers as well as various stencils plus other gear. Iain Wemyss
Exactly as I remember the Study. Also work clothes that could stand up by themselves!
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  #499  
Old 12th December 2011, 09:09
Amsilla Amsilla is offline  
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Mrs Amsilla Naidoo

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And I remember in about 1953-54 sailing on Bank Line's last sailing ship between Calcutta and Durban. What do you mean I'm talking nonsense?!
See the very proof before your eyes on the attached picture.
My late dad was the purser on board the Bankline's "Isipingo". He was a South African Indian-he was called Chris by his mates although his christian name was Krishna Reddy. Not sure whether you knew him.
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  #500  
Old 26th December 2011, 00:07
rcraig rcraig is offline  
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My late dad was the purser on board the Bankline's "Isipingo". He was a South African Indian-he was called Chris by his mates although his christian name was Krishna Reddy. Not sure whether you knew him.
Sorry. Just noticed your post. I did not know him but it may be that some on the site would know and possibly have sailed with him.
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