Bankline in the 50's.... - Page 21 - Ships Nostalgia
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Bankline in the 50's....

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  #501  
Old 26th December 2011, 14:57
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jimthehat jimthehat is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rcraig View Post
Sorry. Just noticed your post. I did not know him but it may be that some on the site would know and possibly have sailed with him.
I have contacted the poster by PM as I may have been on the Isipingo at that time.

jim
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  #502  
Old 16th March 2012, 23:03
Aberdonian Aberdonian is offline  
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Calcutta

Here is a postcard I picked up in 1955 in what is now known as Kolkata, The City of Joy.

I think the vessel moored at the buoys is the Southbank (?).

Aberdonian
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  #503  
Old 17th March 2012, 19:19
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Alan Rawlinson Alan Rawlinson is offline
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hooghly pic

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aberdonian View Post
Here is a postcard I picked up in 1955 in what is now known as Kolkata, The City of Joy.

I think the vessel moored at the buoys is the Southbank (?).

Aberdonian
Looks like that class, but the radar mast abaft the bridge is missing... Not sure when it was fitted, but we had it in 1960 even if the radar did play up most of the time!
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  #504  
Old 17th March 2012, 20:05
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John Campbell John Campbell is offline  
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Originally Posted by Alan Rawlinson View Post
Looks like that class, but the radar mast abaft the bridge is missing... Not sure when it was fitted, but we had it in 1960 even if the radar did play up most of the time!
I did my first trip on the "Southbank" signing on 15.5.53
and she definitely had a radar then which worked spasmodically and was only switched on by Capt Smith alone. The VDU was mounted facing aft, the only time I have seen one so fitted. Smith gave the poor Sparks a hard time and it was not easy effecting repairs as most of the Radar gubbins was fitted into a cupboard in the alloway on the Master's deck.


Great picture of Hoogly Calcutta - I remember it so well tied up to those buoys and the standbys for the bore tides. I never felt well in that place and was taken ashore very ill with dysentry for ten days in luxury - a private ward in a big hospital off the Maidan. I was visited by Capt. Gale after a couple of days who gave me a severe bollocking for not writing home. He would not listen to my excuse as i had no pen,paper or stamps. I then got a "bearer"who was a wizened old man who slept on an old rag in the corner of the ward. This fellow was a sort of topas I suppose. I soon learnt that it was my duty to pay this fellow for doing my dobey etc. and on App,s wages I was not too happy. However Dr Gangooly visited and took care of my expenses.
Then the Mate, Tom Orford, sent for me and instead of TLC I was on the dreaded night shift and struggling with the dreaded clusters etc.

\thanks for the memory Alan = pure nostalgia.
JC
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  #505  
Old 18th March 2012, 08:06
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Alan Rawlinson Alan Rawlinson is offline
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Hooghly capers

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Campbell View Post
I did my first trip on the "Southbank" signing on 15.5.53
and she definitely had a radar then which worked spasmodically and was only switched on by Capt Smith alone. The VDU was mounted facing aft, the only time I have seen one so fitted. Smith gave the poor Sparks a hard time and it was not easy effecting repairs as most of the Radar gubbins was fitted into a cupboard in the alloway on the Master's deck.


Great picture of Hoogly Calcutta - I remember it so well tied up to those buoys and the standbys for the bore tides. I never felt well in that place and was taken ashore very ill with dysentry for ten days in luxury - a private ward in a big hospital off the Maidan. I was visited by Capt. Gale after a couple of days who gave me a severe bollocking for not writing home. He would not listen to my excuse as i had no pen,paper or stamps. I then got a "bearer"who was a wizened old man who slept on an old rag in the corner of the ward. This fellow was a sort of topas I suppose. I soon learnt that it was my duty to pay this fellow for doing my dobey etc. and on App,s wages I was not too happy. However Dr Gangooly visited and took care of my expenses.
Then the Mate, Tom Orford, sent for me and instead of TLC I was on the dreaded night shift and struggling with the dreaded clusters etc.

\thanks for the memory Alan = pure nostalgia.
JC
Hi John,

You've got me going now, and all the memories of lying out in the Hooghly are flooding back! (Pun intended)

I had a surreal experience on the Inchanga in 1951 when detailed off for the night shift when lying out on the buoys. The ship was crawling with repair wallahs and a myriad of unknown bodies as usual. In the small hours of the morning, I went into our double cabin where my fellow Apprentice was sleeping, and I sat on a chair near the door for a few minutes break, and in the dark, I should add. I felt someone brushing silently past me, but could'nt be sure and dismissed it as imagination. Only in the morning, did my chum notice that his watch was missing from the table beside his bunk....

I was always fascinated by the skill of the boatmen in the river, crabbing their way across the river to the landing stage. Always fancied trying my luck at it! Would probably have ended up at Sand Heads!!

Last edited by Alan Rawlinson; 18th March 2012 at 08:31..
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  #506  
Old 18th March 2012, 12:56
Joe C Joe C is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan Rawlinson View Post
Hi John,

You've got me going now, and all the memories of lying out in the Hooghly are flooding back! (Pun intended)

I had a surreal experience on the Inchanga in 1951 when detailed off for the night shift when lying out on the buoys. The ship was crawling with repair wallahs and a myriad of unknown bodies as usual. In the small hours of the morning, I went into our double cabin where my fellow Apprentice was sleeping, and I sat on a chair near the door for a few minutes break, and in the dark, I should add. I felt someone brushing silently past me, but could'nt be sure and dismissed it as imagination. Only in the morning, did my chum notice that his watch was missing from the table beside his bunk....

I was always fascinated by the skill of the boatmen in the river, crabbing their way across the river to the landing stage. Always fancied trying my luck at it! Would probably have ended up at Sand Heads!!
I remember when we were waiting in the Hooghly overnight on the Irisbank to dock in the morning,the Greek ship,also waiting in the river,woke up to find they had no mooring ropes!
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  #507  
Old 18th March 2012, 15:20
Andy Lavies Andy Lavies is offline  
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Eternal vigilence needed when at anchor at Diamond Harbour, too, on the way up to Calcutta, if you didn't want to lose everything portable from the deck.
Andy
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  #508  
Old 18th March 2012, 16:16
bri445 bri445 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aberdonian View Post
I think the vessel moored at the buoys is the Southbank (?).

Aberdonian
Enlarging the photo, you can see the S and the T and it's the right number of letters. I'm convinced, anyway!
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  #509  
Old 18th March 2012, 17:02
Aberdonian Aberdonian is offline  
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Southbank

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Originally Posted by bri445 View Post
Enlarging the photo, you can see the S and the T and it's the right number of letters. I'm convinced, anyway!
Thanks for your keen-eyed confirmation bri445. Much appreciated.

Aberdonian
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  #510  
Old 18th March 2012, 17:26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Lavies View Post
Eternal vigilence needed when at anchor at Diamond Harbour, too, on the way up to Calcutta, if you didn't want to lose everything portable from the deck.
Andy
Strange, 2 years on the isipingo never lost anything deliberate or by theft,BUT on the far east run mooring ropes and zinc ingots had a habit of going astray,and once on the ettrickbank had a good offer if i turned a bline eye whilst the de gausing geat took a walk.

jim
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  #511  
Old 18th March 2012, 19:39
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John Campbell John Campbell is offline  
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Alan here,s
another abiding memory of my first trip to Calcutta was the sight of the Hindu workers spitting their red stained saliva, after chewing their betel quid, all over the bulwarks. Those betel nut vendors selling dabs of lime and biddies were fascinating as they set up shop in some corner of the deck... Remember how the crew smoked their biddies?

Another memory was the strange chanting of the stevedore gangs as they used their hooks to push those huge bales of gunnies into position. When I think of those huge bales swinging around with the winches clattering and the union purchase going I remember few accidents but then there were no health and safety regulations, just the general practice of seamen
The contraption slung over the stern bulwarks to provide a loo for the workers was yet another memory . Never again will we see such sights

Last edited by John Campbell; 18th March 2012 at 19:42..
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  #512  
Old 18th March 2012, 21:04
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Alan Rawlinson Alan Rawlinson is offline
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Hold chants

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Originally Posted by John Campbell View Post
Alan here,s
another abiding memory of my first trip to Calcutta was the sight of the Hindu workers spitting their red stained saliva, after chewing their betel quid, all over the bulwarks. Those betel nut vendors selling dabs of lime and biddies were fascinating as they set up shop in some corner of the deck... Remember how the crew smoked their biddies?

Another memory was the strange chanting of the stevedore gangs as they used their hooks to push those huge bales of gunnies into position. When I think of those huge bales swinging around with the winches clattering and the union purchase going I remember few accidents but then there were no health and safety regulations, just the general practice of seamen
The contraption slung over the stern bulwarks to provide a loo for the workers was yet another memory . Never again will we see such sights
My strongest memory of the chanting in the holds was on the night shift in Chittagong as the gangs struggled to get the big bales up under the beams. Can still hear the rhythm. Just like sea shanties, they have continued down the years to the modern day because I re cently watched a documentary about the Sunderabans area, and the familiar chant was in use. Don't suppose it sounds quite the same swinging containers into position, though!

P.S. The ' thunder boxes ' over the stern are widely used on the Gulf Dhows still, but not sure how that is viewed by all the authorities - health n safety mob etc...
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  #513  
Old 18th March 2012, 21:39
John Dryden John Dryden is offline  
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I sailed with C/O George Milne on both the Olivebank and Shirrabank and he would often join the deck crew chanting away when doing some heaving,interspersed with some choice English words of his own.
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  #514  
Old 19th March 2012, 16:14
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John Campbell John Campbell is offline  
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Another memory - the wallah with a huge bundle of magazines - mostly months old copies of Daily Mirrors and the occasional "dirty Book" How that poor soul negotiated the trips out to the ships at Garden Reach on the sampans and then up the accommodation ladder. Those Daily Mirrors would pe passed around for months afterwards if anyone of us had a rupee to spare. There was also the dobey wallah who would come back with shirts and shorts stiff with starch.
I still have a nest of tables and a lamp stand purchased and sent home by Ram Jam Punchabi -kind soul.
And of course I had my Burtons leather bound
JC
JC
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  #515  
Old 19th March 2012, 16:51
Joe C Joe C is offline  
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Apparently the Swahili chants in Mombasa were a code to warn the gang members who were busy nicking the toys and similar,from Japan which were on their way to South Africa,that the stevedores were closing in on them.
After we had discharged the timber and trees from the lower holds the empty boxes we had to clear up showed they were pretty successful.
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  #516  
Old 19th March 2012, 17:10
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Alan Rawlinson Alan Rawlinson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe C View Post
Apparently the Swahili chants in Mombasa were a code to warn the gang members who were busy nicking the toys and similar,from Japan which were on their way to South Africa,that the stevedores were closing in on them.
After we had discharged the timber and trees from the lower holds the empty boxes we had to clear up showed they were pretty successful.
Joe, Can't remember which ship it was, but discharging cardboard boxes of lovely silk and coloured fabric items from the Far East in Durban on a nice sunny morning with extra special care on the security i.e. apprentices plus a shore guard. Despite this the stevedores managed to go ashore at the end of the shift, singing and hollering, happy as can be, and wearing the ' goods' as a means of pilfering. Multicoloured tops and dresses, plus the usual 2 left or right shoes.
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  #517  
Old 19th March 2012, 17:32
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Originally Posted by Alan Rawlinson View Post
Joe, Can't remember which ship it was, but discharging cardboard boxes of lovely silk and coloured fabric items from the Far East in Durban on a nice sunny morning with extra special care on the security i.e. apprentices plus a shore guard. Despite this the stevedores managed to go ashore at the end of the shift, singing and hollering, happy as can be, and wearing the ' goods' as a means of pilfering. Multicoloured tops and dresses, plus the usual 2 left or right shoes.
yes can still see the the dockers all going ashore with brand new sandels on their feet, only place they could not get into was the strong room at the aft end of nos 3 tweendeck.
seem to remember the chant went something like...aos,aos aos as they dug their hooks into the gunnies,just over three to the ton.

jim
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  #518  
Old 19th March 2012, 18:11
Johnnietwocoats Johnnietwocoats is offline  
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Originally Posted by Alan Rawlinson View Post
Looks like that class, but the radar mast abaft the bridge is missing... Not sure when it was fitted, but we had it in 1960 even if the radar did play up most of the time!
Hi Guys
Here ii a much clearer photo of the Southbank. I noticed that this one doesn't have the white stripe around the ship at deck level.
The Radar mast is plain to see.
I sailed on the Eastbank in 1960. Brought back lots of memories...
JTC
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  #519  
Old 19th March 2012, 19:34
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Alan Rawlinson Alan Rawlinson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Campbell View Post
Another memory - the wallah with a huge bundle of magazines - mostly months old copies of Daily Mirrors and the occasional "dirty Book" How that poor soul negotiated the trips out to the ships at Garden Reach on the sampans and then up the accommodation ladder. Those Daily Mirrors would pe passed around for months afterwards if anyone of us had a rupee to spare. There was also the dobey wallah who would come back with shirts and shorts stiff with starch.
I still have a nest of tables and a lamp stand purchased and sent home by Ram Jam Punchabi -kind soul.
And of course I had my Burtons leather bound
JC
JC
How about the little tailors that would come aboard in Calcutta and sing out " sew, sew, turn collar" offering so called references from satisfied customers, many of them spoof signed, like Mickey Mouse, or Donald Duck.
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  #520  
Old 19th March 2012, 23:26
Aberdonian Aberdonian is offline  
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Then there was the guy who removed corns from feet. He came on board carrying a little cloth roll containing simple steel instruments along with a small leather disc which I took to be a suction pad.

The older officers spoke highly of his skilful treatment.

Aberdonian

Last edited by Aberdonian; 19th March 2012 at 23:29..
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  #521  
Old 20th March 2012, 11:21
Joe C Joe C is offline  
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Alan,do you remember those little Indian/Burmese cheroots you used to smoke until you went to your locker where you kept them and found it crawling alive with "beasties".Back to the roll-ups!
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  #522  
Old 20th March 2012, 16:14
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Back to pilfering...Late 50's-60's, where did the teams of Gurkha security guards come aboard? Real little hard nuts with lead and copper wire weighted bamboo rods. Always kept to themselves doing their own cooking etc. patrolled the deck in pairs 24/7
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  #523  
Old 20th March 2012, 16:58
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Back to pilfering...Late 50's-60's, where did the teams of Gurkha security guards come aboard? Real little hard nuts with lead and copper wire weighted bamboo rods. Always kept to themselves doing their own cooking etc. patrolled the deck in pairs 24/7
The guards were a feature of calcutta I presume all ships not just bank line.

jim
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  #524  
Old 20th March 2012, 18:46
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Alan Rawlinson Alan Rawlinson is offline
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Burmese elephant

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Originally Posted by Joe C View Post
Alan,do you remember those little Indian/Burmese cheroots you used to smoke until you went to your locker where you kept them and found it crawling alive with "beasties".Back to the roll-ups!
Vaguely - can remember the 50 a day habit! ugh...

Talking about Burmese cheroots - we called at Rangoon occasionally on the Inchanga, and also on the Irisbank when I bought a teak elephant on a plinth with a young calf. Must have cost me many tins of fags because it took up a whole suitcase on it's own when the Bank Line kindly flew us all home from Bathurst with unlimited baggage! Still got it in the garage....
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  #525  
Old 20th March 2012, 22:12
notnila notnila is offline  
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Originally Posted by jimthehat View Post
The guards were a feature of calcutta I presume all ships not just bank line.

jim
While in Culcutta on the"Temple Lane"(Lambert Bros)we had a single Gurkha Guard.He'd appear periodically at the Officers Pantry with a pint pot to be filled with tea.That was 1963.

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