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  #1  
Old 27th September 2009, 19:28
henry62 henry62 is offline  
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TUGBOAT Forager

Hi People am doing family research and was wondering if anybody could help me with information about tugboat forager it was sunk in the clyde on 23rd may 1962 while it was pulling a ship into dock my grandfather was on it that day and was missing presumed drowned aswell as another crew member ,but unfortunately thats as far as i seem to get i cant seem to find any newspaper clipings ,photos or further information about that accident that day ,if anyone could give me any information or put me in the right direction to find some i would be grateful.
Thanks
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  #2  
Old 27th September 2009, 21:35
WillieG WillieG is offline  
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I believe this was the ship involved.:

http://www.clydesite.co.uk/clydebuil...ip.asp?id=2387

I'm sure there will be others with more info

Good luck,
Willie
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  #3  
Old 28th September 2009, 08:15
BillH BillH is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by henry62 View Post
Hi People am doing family research and was wondering if anybody could help me with information about tugboat forager it was sunk in the clyde on 23rd may 1962 while it was pulling a ship into dock my grandfather was on it that day and was missing presumed drowned aswell as another crew member ,but unfortunately thats as far as i seem to get i cant seem to find any newspaper clipings ,photos or further information about that accident that day ,if anyone could give me any information or put me in the right direction to find some i would be grateful.
Thanks
FORAGER ( ) (1947 - 1962)
O.N. 180395. 244g. 106.7 x 26.7 x 11.6 feet.
T.3-cyl. (16”, 26” & 43” x 30”) engine manufactured by George Fletcher & Company Ltd., Derby. 175 NHP.

2.12.1944: Launched as EMPIRE BECKY by Henry Scarr & Ltd., Hessle, (Yard No.S 463), for the Ministry of War Transport, London.

30.1.1945: Completed.

1.2.1945: Handed over to Steel & Bennie Ltd., as managers.

1947: Sold to Steel & Bennie Ltd., for 25,000, and renamed FORAGER.

23.5.1962: Capsized and sank whilst assisting and colliding with the British vessel HORORATA (12,090g./42) in the R. Clyde at the entrance to King George V Dock. Two of her crew were lost.

5.6.1962: Raised and offered for sale “as lies”.

1962: Sold to Societa Rimorchiatori Napoletani, Italy, repaired and renamed MASTINO.

1984: Sold to Palermo Salvatore e Cia. S.N.C., Naples, for demolition.

18.6.1984: Work commenced.
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  #4  
Old 28th September 2009, 14:06
henry62 henry62 is offline  
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Forager

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Originally Posted by WillieG View Post
I believe this was the ship involved.:

http://www.clydesite.co.uk/clydebuil...ip.asp?id=2387

I'm sure there will be others with more info

Good luck,
Willie
Thanks for your help i have gone to the link you put in that is one big boat that it was towing
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  #5  
Old 28th September 2009, 14:07
henry62 henry62 is offline  
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Originally Posted by BillH View Post
FORAGER ( ) (1947 - 1962)
O.N. 180395. 244g. 106.7 x 26.7 x 11.6 feet.
T.3-cyl. (16”, 26” & 43” x 30”) engine manufactured by George Fletcher & Company Ltd., Derby. 175 NHP.

2.12.1944: Launched as EMPIRE BECKY by Henry Scarr & Ltd., Hessle, (Yard No.S 463), for the Ministry of War Transport, London.

30.1.1945: Completed.

1.2.1945: Handed over to Steel & Bennie Ltd., as managers.

1947: Sold to Steel & Bennie Ltd., for 25,000, and renamed FORAGER.

23.5.1962: Capsized and sank whilst assisting and colliding with the British vessel HORORATA (12,090g./42) in the R. Clyde at the entrance to King George V Dock. Two of her crew were lost.

5.6.1962: Raised and offered for sale “as lies”.

1962: Sold to Societa Rimorchiatori Napoletani, Italy, repaired and renamed MASTINO.

1984: Sold to Palermo Salvatore e Cia. S.N.C., Naples, for demolition.

18.6.1984: Work commenced.
Thanks for the information its alot more than i have been able to find

Last edited by henry62; 28th September 2009 at 22:37..
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  #6  
Old 30th September 2009, 13:17
henry62 henry62 is offline  
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Im wondering if anyone would be able to help me with who or where could i contact for more informaion about the accident itself and photos of forager itself
Any help would be appreciated .
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  #7  
Old 4th October 2009, 22:28
caledonia caledonia is offline  
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Forager

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Originally Posted by henry62 View Post
Im wondering if anyone would be able to help me with who or where could i contact for more informaion about the accident itself and photos of forager itself
Any help would be appreciated .

Try the following link. Not sure if you need to register to get into the site though.

http://www.clydesite.co.uk/clydeship...31&posted=2008
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  #8  
Old 5th October 2009, 22:20
henry62 henry62 is offline  
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Smile Forager

Thanks for the link appreciate it very much ,will let you know if it is successful for information with regards to forager .
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  #9  
Old 6th October 2009, 12:45
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eriskay eriskay is offline  
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For henry62 :

You have already had responses from others to your question but I thought I might add just a little more. A tragic Clydeside loss, to be repeated again in more recent time with the loss of the tug 'Phantom' and three of her four-man crew in a position not so far from where the 'Forager' went over.

On that fateful morning, I was working on the Elderslie Drydocks & Ship Repair Yard's riverside quay wall, adjacent to Yarrow Shipbuilders, and across river from the Braehead Power Station, when the New Zealand Shipping Company's large refrigerated freighter 'Hororata' hove into sight, moving slowly up the river, with a tug fore and aft.

The aft tug, serving as 'rudder', was the Steel & Bennie tug 'Forager'. As you can see from the photograph I posted on the Clydesite forum, which 'Caledonia' has linked you into, the incident happened abeam of the Yarrow Yard.

The 'Hororata' was lightship and riding high out the water, propeller threshing ineffectively. Just as the tow passed the end of the Elderslie Wall, a strong gust of wind caused the large slab-sided freighter's stern to yaw over towards the Yarrow shipyard. This sudden movement caused the stern wire to go over the tug's deck and superstructure, pulling her over completely in a matter of seconds.

It was a horrifying sight and, although it lasted only for a very short time, and 46 years have elapsed since then, I can still play it back in my mind in slow motion as though it had taken minutes rather than seconds. It was not a sight and incident to be forgotten, especially with two of her crew having lost their lives - one of which it turns out was your own grandfather.

For the next week or two, it was horrific to come to work and gaze out at the wreckage in the river where there was a danger of her slipping off the 'ledge' on which she had settled and settling in the deeper midsection of the river-bed, blocking what was at that time a very busy River Clyde.

The 'Hororata', incidentally, the largest refrigerated freighter in the world when she was built, had an interesting war career. Surviving being torpedoed and even getting a mention in the House by Sir Winston Churchill, she lasted until 1967, but tragically her notoriety was not finished there. In January 1966 she collided with and sank another tug that had been assisting her as she approached Cardiff. This was the tug 'Iselgarth', lost off Penarth, and taking with her three of her six-man crew.

I hope this adds to your information concerning this tragic event and your own personal loss. Incidentally, membership of the Clydesite forum is free and if you choose to join you will have access to a fine photograph of the 'Forager' which, under the circumstances, I am sure the owner would not be averse to you having a copy. Worth a try anyway and best of luck.

Angus Mac Kinnon

Last edited by eriskay; 6th October 2009 at 12:48.. Reason: grammar and spelling correction
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  #10  
Old 7th October 2009, 21:40
henry62 henry62 is offline  
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Smile Forager

Hi Eriskay
Firstly thankyou very much for getting in touch about something that has had such a vivid impact on yourself ,the information that you have given me helps fill in alot of blanks .I would like you to know that my username henry62 was my grandfather, his name being Henry Tait he lived on the Isle of Bute originally from holytown ,unfortunately i never knew him as he died 2 years before i was born .
I will be looking on the site you mentioned am just waiting to get registered and hopefully will be able to get a copy of the picture you mentioned .
i hope remembering this hasnt caused you any upset ,and i thankyou again very much for this as it give me more of a picture of what happened to him .
Gratefully Yours
Rab Tait
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  #11  
Old 8th October 2009, 00:05
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eriskay eriskay is offline  
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Rab Tait :

Nice touch, Rab, adopting the name and year of the grandfather that you were not to know due to a tragic maritime tragedy. I hope you are successful in getting a photograph of the tug. If you put the name 'Forager' in the search system in SN Gallery you will see another view of her looking upriver, towards the Blythswood shipyard, next door to Yarrow Shipbuilders. That was about the time that the Blythswood Yard was going into terminal decline and as you will see the berths were all empty and cranes lying idled when that shot was taken. (This image was posted on 12th January 2006 by 'clydebuiltbob')

No - relaying the story for you did not cause me upset, it just rekindled a great sadness from many years ago, having watched first hand the inexorable destruction of life and vessel by a greater force. You don't forget this sort of sickening experience.

Thanks for responding and good luck with your search.

Angus Mac Kinnon

Last edited by eriskay; 8th October 2009 at 08:35.. Reason: typo corrections
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  #12  
Old 16th October 2009, 15:49
henry62 henry62 is offline  
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Forager

Hi I have been trying to find out if the bodies of my grandfather and the other crew member who went down with the tug forager were ever recovered or not ,but cant seem to find the information to tell me this ,i was wondering if anyone could maybe point me in the right direction to find out more if possible i would be grateful for any help with this .

Thanks

Last edited by henry62; 16th October 2009 at 15:53..
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  #13  
Old 27th October 2009, 21:37
Robert Robert is offline
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Tug Forager

Hi HENRY IF YOU CAN GET HOLD OF A BOOK CALLED EMPIRE TUGS BY W.J.HARVEY AND K. TURRELL. THERE IS INFO ON THE TUG PLUS A PHOTO OF THE TUG BEING RAISED . AFTER SINKING IN THE RIVER CLYDE . ROBERT
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  #14  
Old 27th October 2009, 22:03
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eriskay eriskay is offline  
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For Rab Tait :

I think you can take it for granted that the bodies were recovered within a day or so of the incident - they were trapped down below - and there were divers assigned to the wreck very quickly. (She had to be secured as a priority incase she might slip off the ledge she settled on and settle in the deeper and central part of the river)

I think a review of the Glasgow newspapers for that week (Glasgow Herald, Record and Evening Times) would probably contain some announcement once the bodies were recovered - that would be normal. An alternative suggestion, contact the Glasgow Humane Society (Glasgow Green, Glasgow, G40 1BA) and check with George Parsonage who, at the time of the incident in question, as a young man, worked with his famous father, Ben Parsonage on rescuing and saving people who got into trouble on the river. Think this tragedy would have been dealt with by the Clyde Navigation Trust, but there is a good chance that the Humane Society records might contain the information you seek.

Angus Mac Kinnon
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  #15  
Old 2nd November 2009, 21:59
henry62 henry62 is offline  
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Thanks once again angus for your information ,i have been on the other site you said about and now have some pictures of the tug which is really great to have and now with this extra information you have given me i will see if i can get the rest of the information i would like to put it all together .

Once again Thanks very much
Rab
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  #16  
Old 2nd November 2009, 22:21
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eriskay eriskay is offline  
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You're very welcome, Rab, I hope you eventually get the remaining details of this Clydeside tragedy, repeated again more recently when the tug 'Flying Phantom' was lost on the River in December 2007 - and not very far from where the 'Forgager' was lost.

Angus
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  #17  
Old 2nd November 2009, 23:34
Santos Santos is offline  
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Angus,

I am genuinely touched by your kindness to henry62 and your help to him. It is only through first hand knowledge from people like yourself that these tragic incidents are recognised and people can truely understand the dangers that seamen faced whether deep sea or as in this case a tug working locally.

Thanks for helping henry, Angus and for releasing to us your feelings and how the accident affected you personally.

Chris.

Last edited by Santos; 2nd November 2009 at 23:45..
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  #18  
Old 3rd November 2009, 13:13
henry62 henry62 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert View Post
Hi HENRY IF YOU CAN GET HOLD OF A BOOK CALLED EMPIRE TUGS BY W.J.HARVEY AND K. TURRELL. THERE IS INFO ON THE TUG PLUS A PHOTO OF THE TUG BEING RAISED . AFTER SINKING IN THE RIVER CLYDE . ROBERT
Hi Robert

Thankyou for this info i will have a look for that , it would be really good to have along with the other bits i have been lucky enough to get from people on here being really helpful to me ,i am now getting to know something abut the life of my grandfather.
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  #19  
Old 4th December 2009, 20:35
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For Henry62 :

Loss of the Clyde Tug S.S. 'Forager' on Wednesday 23rd of May 1962

Apologies for the time it has taken, but I can now provide further details taken from the press of that time. We have covered most of the details of that tragic day already, but here is additional and supplementary information, some of which I was not aware of myself until undertaking this latest research, and which I am sure will be of interest to you.

The two Clyde tugs (owners Steel & Bennie) that were assisting the large NZSCL refrigerated cargo-liner Hororata upriver that day were the Forager at the stern, and Wrestler on the bow. The steam-engined Forager was under the command of Skipper James Bonner and her companion-tug Wrestler was under the command of Skipper Hugh Cooke.

Although she normally carried a complement of eight, on this occasion the Forager was down to seven men due to a last minute illness. On board :

Skipper - James Bonner, 51, Polmadie Road, Glasgow
Chief Engineer - James Cavanagh, 30, Weir Street, Greenock (51 years)
Mate - Malcolm Crow (36 years)
2nd Engineer - Henry Tait, 1, Minister's Brae, Rothesay, Isle of Bute (53 years)
Seaman - Frank Somerville, Bearhope Street, Greenock (38 years)
Seaman - Michael McMonagle, 70, Burnhead Street, Greenock (22 years)
Fireman - Joseph McFadden, 14, Hillend Place, Greenock (51 years)

The tow-line crossed over Forager's hull, fouling with her mast and funnel, turning the small ship over on her side very rapidly. Immediately, water started to enter the stricken vessel through open hatches, exacerbated by the backwash from the threshing propeller of the large Hororata.

Skipper James Bonner, Mate Malcolm Crow and young sailor Michael McMonagle (whose father, ironically, was on the companion tug Wrestler), seeing that she vessel was going to sink, jumped overboard and hung on to lifebelts that had been thrown down into the water by crewmen of the Hororata. Chief Engineer James Cavanagh and Fireman Joe McFadden had been on their way topside when the tug went over and they were submerged in the inflowing surge of water, but managed to find an open grating through which they reached the surface and grabbed lifebelts.

Chief Bonner had only just a few minutes earlier been relieved by 2nd Engineer HenryTait, who was now trapped down below.

Frank Somerville was trapped down below in the crew's accommodation.

Robert Donnelly, 3, Grove Street, Cowcaddens, Glasgow, a boatman employed by the nearby Blythswood Shipyard, heard the commotion on the River, and boat's sirens blowing off, and immediately set off at maximum speed from the yard jetty with his boat to render any assistance he could. As he arrived at the scene he saw three survivors had managed to clamber on to the uptuned side of the stricken vessel and walk down her length alongside her keel, arriving just as he nosed his boat in so that they were all able to step on board the rescue boat. Donnelly quickly transferred the men to the tug Brigadier that was standing by the scene.

Another boatman, David Inglis, with the help of three of the crew from the tug Brigadier also joined in the fight to save the men in the sinking. The Brigadier's crewmen involved in this valiant rescue attempt were James McGorra, Willie Rodger and Skipper Hugh Cooke. David Inglis, a Partick man, along with one of the Brigadier's crew then stepped on board the hull of Forager, determined to make every effort humanly possible to reach and rescue the two missing crew members trapped down below, one in the Engine Room, the other in the Accommodation. As she filled with water, the Forager came back on an almost even keel but their efforts were thwarted by the cascading torrent of water still flooding the vessel.

The Brigadier raced away with the five survivors to King George V dock where ambulances were waiting to rush them to a hospital.

Meantime, over the next two days, it was established that the tug was lying in 16 feet of water and sitting precariously on the edge of the mid-river deep-water channel and therefore any further attempts to retrieve the bodies of the two crewman still trapped on board would only put the lives of the divers involved at further risk if she suddenly rolled into the trench in the strong current. For this reason, no attempt was made until the vessel was raised, on Tuesday 5th of June 1962, and taken upriver to King George V dock. At this time, police removed the bodies of Henry Tait (53 years) and Frank Somerville (38 years), 12 days after they perished in this tragic incident.

Frank Somerville who had just newly joined the Forager, having been out of work for some three months, lived for the sea according to his Mother, Helen.

Henry Tait, Second Engineer, who died in the Forager's Engine Room, had already survived death during WWII when the Minesweeper in which he was serving was struck by a mine. According to a relative, "His ship was struck by one of our own mines in the Irish Sea. Luckily there was a Destroyer in the area and he and the rest of the crew were safely taken off the stricken vessel and on board the naval ship. Now this terrible thing has happened."

Mr. Tait, a married man with four grown-up sons, had been at sea all his life. After the war, he worked as a stoker on board Clyde pleasure steamers, then changed over on to the tugs.

Two weeks before the tragic events on the Clyde, he and his wife, Agnes, had moved into a new tenement house in Rothesay, on the Isle of Bute.

There are numerous photographs in the contemporary Glasgow newspapers showing crewmen and rescuers, and the wreck at Scotstoun with the tugs Flying Merlin and Flying Wizard standing by.

Kind regards,

Angus Mac Kinnon

Last edited by eriskay; 4th December 2009 at 20:43..
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  #20  
Old 4th December 2009, 21:59
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Coincidentally, another tug was in trouble on the same day as the 'Forager'.

This was the tug 'Tollman' that was pulled over by her towrope when towing a Finnish ship out of drydock (Hull)

My understanding (unsubstantiated) is that only her Master and the Acting Mate survived, and two engineers and a young deckboy of 15 years were lost, all three being from Hull.

Anyone able to ratify?
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  #21  
Old 5th December 2009, 04:20
Doug Shaw Doug Shaw is offline  
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Angus, you are quite correct (and, incidentally, that was an excellent piece of research you posted). The tug Tollman did sink on the same day in 1962 and there is more information on the sinking in another thread, which you will find here.

Regards
Doug

Last edited by Doug Shaw; 5th December 2009 at 04:23..
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  #22  
Old 5th December 2009, 09:42
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Loss of Tugs 'Forager' and 'Tollman' in 1962

Thank you, Doug, I don't recall the Hull incident at the time, yet when I was researching the Clyde incident yesterday I found it was covered the following day in the Scottish newspapers. What a tragic day for the tuggies that day.

Angus.
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  #23  
Old 5th December 2009, 10:02
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I seem to remember that the Hororata was involved in the capsizing of another tug in S.Wales...? ? ?

Jim
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  #24  
Old 5th December 2009, 10:07
Billieboy Billieboy is offline  
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Jim, I think that was in Cardiff about 1957-8 Queens dock.
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  #25  
Old 5th December 2009, 14:45
BillH BillH is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by todd View Post
I seem to remember that the Hororata was involved in the capsizing of another tug in S.Wales...? ? ?

Jim
Perhaps this is the incident in mind?

ISELGARTH
O.N. 162155. 152g. 90.0 x 24.0 x 11.2 feet.
Two, C.2-cyl. (15" & 32" x 24") engines manufactured by Plenty & Son Ltd., Newbury, driving twin screws. 112 nhp. 8 tons bollard pull. 9 kts.
31.1.1949: Launched as GWENT by Charles Hill & Sons Ltd., Bristol (Yard No. 354) for the British Transport Commission.
6.1949: Completed. Registered at Newport.
1963: Transferred to the British Transport Docks Board.
14.7.1963: Purchased by R. & J. H. Rea Ltd., London, and later renamed ISELGARTH. Re-registered at Cardiff.
01:55hrs - 15.1.1966: Collided with her tow, HORORATA, 12,090g. /42, off Penarth Head. Three crewmen were lost and three others were picked up by PLUMGARTH.
6.2.1966: Raised by T. H. Brown & Sons Ltd., Bristol, and subsequently placed in a drydock in Cardiff for inspection. Whilst the drydock was being drained ISELGARTH slipped off her blocks and landed in the bottom of the dock. Again she was refloated and the dock successfully drained.
Following inspection she was declared beyond economical repair and was sold to A. F. Knill & Company Ltd., Cardiff, for demolition.
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