H series Shell tankers - Ships Nostalgia
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H series Shell tankers

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  #1  
Old 23rd March 2012, 15:14
NicoRos NicoRos is offline
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H series Shell tankers

These rusty old Shell tankers will once more be revived. Very skilled modellers have managed to built scale 1:130 replica's of these well known ships. The Dutch flag Kosicia's drawings have been used.
The work is still in progress and a lot has yet to be done before the exact replica's can be launched. All are fully radio controlled, but will be usually used for display only.
The total number will 15, Dutch and UK customers, who can choose from their favourite names.
E.t.a. will be approx august. They will be marketed marginally.
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  #2  
Old 24th March 2012, 15:03
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mikeg mikeg is offline  
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Shell's H Boats

Had a shock when you said Shells 'H Boats' were going to be revived! Okay that said I quite liked my trips aboard the Halia.
Kudos to those skilled modellers, I'm really looking forward to seeing the 1:130 replicas.
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  #3  
Old 11th April 2012, 16:42
barney b barney b is offline  
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How can one get a chance to buy one?
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  #4  
Old 11th April 2012, 16:49
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Dry dock job to fit a new propeller. The model looks like a photo of the orginal.

Last edited by R58484956; 10th February 2013 at 16:53..
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  #5  
Old 11th April 2012, 17:03
james hansell james hansell is offline  
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sailed on the Hemiplecta in 1964,last voyage before it was transfered to Australia Shell,paid off in Yokahama Japan, be pleased to hear from any old shipmates. jim
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  #6  
Old 11th April 2012, 22:08
NicoRos NicoRos is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barney b View Post
How can one get a chance to buy one?
The time that the models will go on transport will be announced on the picasa album.

https://picasaweb.google.com/1036923...kxfjnY3B0M0B_w
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  #7  
Old 18th July 2012, 12:53
Frank Lawlor Frank Lawlor is offline  
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I did my first 2 trips on the Hastula. Sailed from Rotterdam up the coast of Norway around April 66. It paid off in Hull, but I stayed on for the next trip to Venezuela, and went up the East coast of the USA, and then down the St Lawrence to Montreal. Ended up paying off in Cardiff I think.
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  #8  
Old 6th February 2013, 22:11
Tom Priestnall Tom Priestnall is offline  
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Hyala and Hinea for me!.
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  #9  
Old 7th February 2013, 09:30
tom roberts tom roberts is offline  
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Sailed on the Hyria mid 50s as s.o.s 7 months trips up and down the east coast Americas B.A. to Perth Amboy other ports Corpus Christi, Curacoa, ,Bush Terminal Brooklin among other.Had a good time. Not a bad feeder as I recall.Love the model would like one maybe I could point out my cabin port side nearest the stern, single berth first ship I was ever on that I had one.
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  #10  
Old 10th February 2013, 15:42
calvin calvin is offline  
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mine halia lightening ops round uk waters and continent
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  #11  
Old 1st May 2013, 10:39
Dave Hone Dave Hone is offline  
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Was in the Helcion, Helisoma, Haminea, Hyria & Hadra in the '60's. Average trip was about 7 - 9 months. Good days, we saw a lot of the world and it always seemed safe to go ashore anywhere (apart from Viet Nam but that's another story!)
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  #12  
Old 1st May 2013, 14:39
jonjo777 jonjo777 is offline  
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hi i sailed on the hindsia from singapore in the sixties
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  #13  
Old 11th May 2013, 23:19
Jim Glover Jim Glover is offline  
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Sailed on the Hemiplecta as 4/E 1973ish Field Days every day The water book was the most important piece of documented information .2/E used to go bananas if you used too much water .Now all they are concerned about is accident reports,permit to work and every piece of paper document going .Still believe the old days were the best coming off watch and having a few ice cool beers with your mates .
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  #14  
Old 12th May 2013, 01:37
oldman 80 oldman 80 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NicoRos View Post
These rusty old Shell tankers will once more be revived. Very skilled modellers have managed to built scale 1:130 replica's of these well known ships. The Dutch flag Kosicia's drawings have been used.
The work is still in progress and a lot has yet to be done before the exact replica's can be launched. All are fully radio controlled, but will be usually used for display only.
The total number will 15, Dutch and UK customers, who can choose from their favourite names.
E.t.a. will be approx august. They will be marketed marginally.

I never worked for Shell other than periodically ending up on Charter to them.
The model however I believe I recognise clearly. I sailed on an ex- Shell H class (I believe) back in the mid 1970's as Chief Officer. She was called the ss. Siam and was at that time, one of two, (ss Bangkok being the other), owned by Thai Ocean Transport Co., (TOTCO). She was a Thai Tanker Training ship, (purchased from Shell and Chartered back to them) managed and operated by Denholm Ship Management (U.K.). She was a Jumbo-ised version of the original Shell "H Class", having been cut in half and a new additional section inserted abaft the midship castle, increasing her deadweight to somewhere in the region of 70,000 tonnes, if my memory serves me correctly. A "free flow" tanker she was, which had both its upsides and downsides.
As for the "Rusty" description, well yes she certainly was that, except for the new section inserted during the jumbo-isation process.
As C/O I vividly recall the incredibly rusted and seemingly paper thin bulkhead between the pump room and cargo spaces forward of it. ( the pump room was immediately forward of the aft accommodation block and E.R.) The corrosion in that vicinity was "alarming", and I recall the Master of the vessel giving me clear instructions that at twilight each morning, I was to ensure the E.R. and aft accommodation was still where it should be, and that it had not "dropped off" during the hours of darkness.
He further added, I was to call him immediately, - if it had.
Despite that factor, she was an incredibly happy ship, manned to the hilt, as each DSM deck and engineer officer, had a Thai Military (Navy) counterpart/understudy who was there being trained in Tanker Operations. They were a great bunch of guys. For my part, it was both a privilege and a pleasure, to have been involved in that particular training project.
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  #15  
Old 12th May 2013, 05:25
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BlythSpirit BlythSpirit is offline  
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I would think it nigh on impossible to jumboize a 19,000 DWT vessel to 70,000DWT. Shell did it with Z class ships from 38,000DWT
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  #16  
Old 12th May 2013, 08:42
oldman 80 oldman 80 is offline  
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Originally Posted by BlythSpirit View Post
I would think it nigh on impossible to jumboize a 19,000 DWT vessel to 70,000DWT. Shell did it with Z class ships from 38,000DWT
Well as I said I was never a shell guy. You may well be right and it could have been a Z class vessel - I'm not sure - it was a long time ago now. However the looks are very similar, as depicted by the model shown in posting No.1.
Irrespective though, for some reason the "H" class sticks in my mind - so clearly one of us has got the "Z" and the "H" classes mixed up.
Quite apart from that, one thing is obviously common to both the Z and the H class of Shell tanker, (and probably a few more besides) namely, significant Corrosion and Wastage, on a fairly extensive scale.
Additionally, in those days Shell were considered little more than being amongst the worlds most major environmental vandals. They were also most probably the first to latch on to the concept of selling off their old junk tonnage to third world, would be operators, complete with a guaranteed "charter back" contract. That way they could continue to operate (by then) inferior, sub standard, past their use by date tankers, under the "umbrella" of foreign operators.
When incidents occurred, such as major oil spills, groundings etc., etc., then the arrangements outlined, concealed who was really behind it all, - but not for long though !!!
The practice was soon exposed for what it really was, and then, and only then, did Shell set about cleaning up it's act - quite dramatically so, if my memory serves me correctly. It was a fairly lengthy and protracted process still not completed by the end of the 1980's, and perhaps not entirely - even today.
Were the Shell "Z" class vessels "free flow" ships ?
If so, then you are probably right, although "Z" does not stick in my mind - whilst "H" does - for some obscure reason.
(I'm sure the ss.Siam's original plans had an "H" as the first letter of the original vessels name - but I could be wrong though).

Edit:- Your "From 38000 Dwt" certainly sounds right - or thereabouts.

Last edited by oldman 80; 12th May 2013 at 08:52.. Reason: Afterthought.
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  #17  
Old 12th May 2013, 18:28
Manchester Manchester is offline  
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Originally Posted by oldman 80 View Post
Well as I said I was never a shell guy. You may well be right and it could have been a Z class vessel - I'm not sure - it was a long time ago now. However the looks are very similar, as depicted by the model shown in posting No.1.
Irrespective though, for some reason the "H" class sticks in my mind - so clearly one of us has got the "Z" and the "H" classes mixed up.
Quite apart from that, one thing is obviously common to both the Z and the H class of Shell tanker, (and probably a few more besides) namely, significant Corrosion and Wastage, on a fairly extensive scale.
Additionally, in those days Shell were considered little more than being amongst the worlds most major environmental vandals. They were also most probably the first to latch on to the concept of selling off their old junk tonnage to third world, would be operators, complete with a guaranteed "charter back" contract. That way they could continue to operate (by then) inferior, sub standard, past their use by date tankers, under the "umbrella" of foreign operators.
When incidents occurred, such as major oil spills, groundings etc., etc., then the arrangements outlined, concealed who was really behind it all, - but not for long though !!!
The practice was soon exposed for what it really was, and then, and only then, did Shell set about cleaning up it's act - quite dramatically so, if my memory serves me correctly. It was a fairly lengthy and protracted process still not completed by the end of the 1980's, and perhaps not entirely - even today.
Were the Shell "Z" class vessels "free flow" ships ?
If so, then you are probably right, although "Z" does not stick in my mind - whilst "H" does - for some obscure reason.
(I'm sure the ss.Siam's original plans had an "H" as the first letter of the original vessels name - but I could be wrong though).

Edit:- Your "From 38000 Dwt" certainly sounds right - or thereabouts.
Oldman 80 you certainly seem to live in a dream world. I sailed on "Siam" in 1982 and it was originally Shell tanker "Dorcasia" an all aft tanker which has never been jumboised!
Her sister ship was called "Mena" another Shell "D" class ship. They were both managed by Shell and crewed by Shell personnel. Nothing at all to do with Denholms (thank God).
Suggest you go back to sleep.
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  #18  
Old 13th May 2013, 00:17
oldman 80 oldman 80 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Manchester View Post
Oldman 80 you certainly seem to live in a dream world. I sailed on "Siam" in 1982 and it was originally Shell tanker "Dorcasia" an all aft tanker which has never been jumboised!
Her sister ship was called "Mena" another Shell "D" class ship. They were both managed by Shell and crewed by Shell personnel. Nothing at all to do with Denholms (thank God).
Suggest you go back to sleep.
NO, YOU ARE WRONG !!!!! VERY WRONG.
You may have sailed on a "Siam" in 1982, but it was not the "Siam" I refer to - it was probably her replacement. The one I refer to was scrapped before 1980.
The one you sailed on may have been, indeed probably was, Shell Managed - Denholm's management / training agreement having been completed long before the era you are shouting your mouth off about, so rudely, so arrogantly, and with such obvious ignorance.

The s.s. Siam you are talking about is an entirely different vessel.
The Siam I am referring to did not survive until 1982 - she was scrapped in the latter part of the 1970's, and probably in mid-late 1977 or thereabouts. ( I believe, in fact am almost certain, TOTCO replaced her with another vessel and named her "Siam" also.
The Siam I refer to was as follows :-
Registered in Bangkok.
Official Number:-164987 or 169987 (the stamp is smudged)
GRT 33635
NRT 21374
SHP 14790
The ss Siam I refer to was very much a Denholm Managed Ship, (Group 3 - I think, - Superintendent David Livingstone. )
I signed on her on 26th July 1975 in Whangerei N.Z. ( D. Naismith was Master) Articles closed/reopened Dubai 1st Sept 1975 and change of Master to Malcolm Cameron. I signed off her in Teesport on 21st January 1976.
Go on - now tell me I was not employed by DSM.
I agree, thank god you were not engaged by Denholm - You wouldn't have lasted long if you had been.
You clearly have some problems !!
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  #19  
Old 13th May 2013, 00:32
Hugh Wilson Hugh Wilson is offline  
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Oldman80,

Off topic I know, but I see you sailed with a good friend of mine, Malcolm Cameron. Unfortunately Malcolm died 3 years back after struggling with prostate cancer for some time. Sadly, his eldest son died of the same illness only one year later. As far as I know, Joan, his wife is still living in Buckie.

Hugh
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  #20  
Old 13th May 2013, 00:58
oldman 80 oldman 80 is offline  
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Originally Posted by Hugh Wilson View Post
Oldman80,

Off topic I know, but I see you sailed with a good friend of mine, Malcolm Cameron. Unfortunately Malcolm died 3 years back after struggling with prostate cancer for some time. Sadly, his eldest son died of the same illness only one year later. As far as I know, Joan, his wife is still living in Buckie.

Hugh
Oh - that is sad news indeed.
I last had some contact with Malcolm (in Buckie) around 2001, but it was only quite briefly - some email exchanges.
His wife joined the Siam along with two of his children, when I was signing off in Teesport. We met quite briefly. I think she and the children remained on board until he completed his tour of duty - in Fos I think.
That bloody cancer - it got me too - but I have survived mine - thanks to some excellent surgeons etc., - here in Australia. Had I not migrated here, I am certain I would not be around today. In that respect, Australia has been amazingly good to me, indeed, unbelievably so.

Kindest Regards,
and I hope this finds you in good health.
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  #21  
Old 13th May 2013, 05:06
Ian Brown Ian Brown is offline  
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I was 2nd mate on the 'Bangkok' and we took her over from French Shell in Singapore and she had been the 'Isocardia'
She was jumbo-ized with a terrible change in beam just ford of E/R.

The auto-pilot and original rudder just couldn't keep her on a straight course and if you had a ship on a course that would pass close you had to put a man on the wheel to steady her up.
The cargo system was free-flow.
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  #22  
Old 13th May 2013, 05:58
oldman 80 oldman 80 is offline  
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I was 2nd mate on the 'Bangkok' and we took her over from French Shell in Singapore and she had been the 'Isocardia'
She was jumbo-ized with a terrible change in beam just ford of E/R.

The auto-pilot and original rudder just couldn't keep her on a straight course and if you had a ship on a course that would pass close you had to put a man on the wheel to steady her up.
The cargo system was free-flow.
That sounds pretty much to me like the identical sister of the DSM managed ss. Siam - of the mid 1970's era.
Those Thai trainees certainly benefited from the total DSM experience, as indeed did TOTCO itself.
Not only did they learn and experience practical on board tanker practice, but they also learned a serious lesson about Shell and their second hand junk tonnage marketing policies.
They learned that if subjected to those policies again at any time in the future, then they should not decline the offer, but they should be absolutely certain that Shell be contracted to manage their own crap tonnage (past it's use by date) for themselves.
By the time Siam and Bangkok were scrapped DSM had trained those guys very well - the whole "complete tanker package" - in fact. Those guys had experienced it first hand for themselves, and they could therefore, by then, I suspect, stand very much on their own two feet and keep their heads above water - so to speak.
That was Denholm Training at its best - total and complete, in every sense of the word. How to do it and how not to do it. It's what they set out to do, and that's what they did by the end.
To keep crap tonnage running takes the very best the industry has to offer - make no mistake about that.
The names of most of those Thai guys have escaped my memory - as they were rather strange and complicated names. Not so however, the most infamous of them all, I reckon. Extra 2/0, and I have reason to believe, subsequently C/O Chitporn Tanti - something or other.
My god was he a character and a half - the type most would welcome on any kind of vessel, I suspect. Oh boy could he relate a good story - from the days he flew migs for the Thai Fleet Air Arm equivalent (I suppose). That of course was prior to being disciplined for his "in flight" escapades, and being sent to sea to learn tanker ops with DSM, - allegedly as part of his "punishment".
Good old Chitporn - people like him really do "brighten the horizons" sometimes.
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  #23  
Old 13th May 2013, 06:57
oldman 80 oldman 80 is offline  
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Just had another memory recall as a result of #21 above.
Yes Siam had been French at some time in the past.
She still had on board in the Bosuns store the mandatory (under French legislation) lead lined coffin - just in case.
The chinese crew did not like that at all - it was a bad omen in their book.
By comparison, under Red Ensign legislation - well just a piece of old canvas sufficed.
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  #24  
Old 13th May 2013, 09:04
davidrwarwick davidrwarwick is offline  
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Could it have been Isomeria, sister ship of Isocardia (Bangkok), also jumboised, built 1956 scrapped 1975.

More details :-

http://www.helderline.nl/tanker/339/isomeria+(1)/

Dave
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  #25  
Old 13th May 2013, 19:57
Manchester Manchester is offline  
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Ok, grovel time again! Sincere apologies to Oldman 80. I now realise the "Siam" I sailed on was a replacement for the "Siam" you sailed on. The one I was on appears to have been bought by TOTCO in 1977 - so a slight confusion when you said you were on it in the mid 70's.
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