Wooden Bridge Fronts - Page 2 - Ships Nostalgia
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  #26  
Old 12th July 2019, 10:20
Stephen J. Card's Avatar
Stephen J. Card Stephen J. Card is offline  
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Some apprentices or cadets used to enjoy doing the 'brightwork'. When you enjoy doing something it ceases to be work!
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  #27  
Old 12th July 2019, 11:54
genejay2 genejay2 is offline  
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I was an apprentice on "MT SHELL" sailing out of Durban during either 1978/79 when I did all the weather doors-sanded down, linseed oiled, then several coats of varnish-Thought I had done a marvelous job, only to have the company scrap her about a month later-also did not think that my "labour of love" was slave labour-all that fresh air and sunshine was great-plus it kept the First Mate off my back.
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  #28  
Old 12th July 2019, 14:24
OilJiver OilJiver is online now  
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Heavy wooden weather deck doors do look great when well preserved Genejay.
Not so great when shipping green stuff though!
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  #29  
Old 12th July 2019, 15:44
onestar onestar is offline
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I sailed on the Shell Tanker Standella, built in 1934 (?). The entire bridge was of wooden construction, the wooden deck forming the deckhead of the Master' s accommodation below. We had only magnetic compasses which was the reason for this form of construction.
Concerning ships magnetism, permanent magnetism is induced from the Earth's lines of force. Strength and nature of this magnetism depends largely on the direction in which she was orientated whilst under construction and the magnetic latitude.
Deviation is caused by many variable factors which require the compass to be swung annually, or at least that was what it was!
The "balls" referred to earlier are the quadrantal spheres, which can be moved in or out, or even slewed under certain circumstances while doing compass adjustment.
I was qualified to adjust compasses, but that was a long time ago!
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  #30  
Old 13th July 2019, 10:39
Davie M Davie M is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stein View Post
The interior of plastic and steel yachts are still largely wood, a living material that people deem more pleasant to touch than any man-made material. Why this should be so, I believe nobody has satisfactorily explained.
Hi Stein, The reason that lots of different linings are used on the inside on small grp and steel hulls is not only making the inside more comfortable but it also hides a multitude of cables and pipe work.
It also provides, to either hold insulation in situ or cover the rough foam outer layer depending on which type is used to insulate with.
Having experienced first hand sailing in a small steel yacht over many years the problem with condensation can be a real menace more so that with grp. I solved the grp problem with cork floor tiles glued to the grp.
With the steel I used rockwool so it required an inner lining if only to stop it collecting dust, not good enough said wife so lined with with t&g American white ash. Ended up with a wooden boat inside a steel hull.
Davie
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  #31  
Old 13th July 2019, 12:04
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If the apprentices/cadets were doing all this woodwork what was the carpenter doing?

Frank
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  #32  
Old 13th July 2019, 12:27
seaman38 seaman38 is offline  
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Originally Posted by duquesa View Post
I sailed on ships as one of four and sometimes two apprentices. We were happy and well looked after. Good company and much attention was paid to our education although this did depend to a degree on the C/O or 1/O. However, it was part of our voyage routine to maintain the "brightwork" including two large gangways to the highest standard.. We all took huge pleasure in so doing and the results were a delight. No varnish work ever looked better. If the company appeared to be or were gaining cheap labour, it never occurred to any of us at that time. Wonderful days.
The 'Liner' company I served my time with (50's) all the C/O's had the same attitude, to get as much work out of the cadets, who were not paid overtime, as possible to save paying the deck crew overtime. Up every morning 0630 hours to wash down the bridge, boat deck and prom deck regardless of weather, so the few passengers had clean places to walk, set out a dozen heavy steamer chairs, all before 0800, change into uniform for an 0800 breakfast and be back on deck in working gear by 0830. No apprentices kept sea watches as that meant they would be considered idle, rather than continuing their education of ship construction by close up work of chipping and painting. No time off for studying, knock off 1800 in the saloon by 1900, back on deck at 2000 to stow steamer chairs, then study if you could keep your eyes open.

In port down WCSA temps 90 -100f down the hatches cargo watching making sure no cargo overstowed or over carried, keeping an eye on 20 - 30 tough stevedores (versus 1 x 16 yr old) to prevent them pilfering pilfering, normal stretch down a hatch 14 -18 hours with 30 minute meal breaks. Then off course there was the derrick and jumbo work, not saying I didn't enjoy it at the time, we knew no better. It was only after joining other companies you saw how it should be done.

After finishing my time my next deep sea ship was one of Ropners, cadets got paid overtime and in the afternoon, I taught them chartwork, semaphore, morse and aldis lamps and other subjects. If they wanted to, in the evenings they would go on the foc'le and I would send them messages on the all round morse lamp, if no ships in the vicinity. The accommodation was good, the food was good and the Masters and C/O's (apart from one) had an interest in their officers and cadets progress.
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  #33  
Old 13th July 2019, 12:39
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I ordered teak to make two gangway rails. The teak arrived the same day Chippy was going away on leave. So, set to work make them. Shaping, fixing onto the gangway. No problem. The Old Man said I was the highest paid Chippy in the fleet!

I did five years in Technical School, The Bermuda Technical Institute. Apart from the usual, maths, physics, Eng language etc we did Metal Work Shop, Metal Technology, Wood Work Ship, Metal Technology and Technical Drawing. I did a little bit of coastal navigation at night school. I did an O Level ART with Distinction.... I didn't do any art classes. :-)

It was the five years at the Tech that was most useful for a career at sea.
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  #34  
Old 13th July 2019, 15:41
Engine Serang Engine Serang is offline  
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The Bermuda Technical Institute, you couldn't make it up.
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  #35  
Old 13th July 2019, 16:45
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Ah, but you might have been confused if you saw the address.... DEVONSHIRE!

1965. All schools were desegregated. Went from a 100% white school to a 95% black school. We didn't think about race. The only thing that was crammed down our throats was 'O- LEVELS'. Half of the teachers were black and the other were white... all UK.

The Head was from Lancashire. Years later he was retired and I was Harbour Master. The former Head was given a small temp job in the office. One morning he came in late. I went to his little room and said grumpily, "Crawford! YOU ARE LATE!!!!"
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  #36  
Old 13th July 2019, 17:15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seaman38 View Post
The 'Liner' company I served my time with (50's) all the C/O's had the same attitude, to get as much work out of the cadets, who were not paid overtime, as possible to save paying the deck crew overtime. Up every morning 0630 hours to wash down the bridge, boat deck and prom deck regardless of weather, so the few passengers had clean places to walk, set out a dozen heavy steamer chairs, all before 0800, change into uniform for an 0800 breakfast and be back on deck in working gear by 0830. No apprentices kept sea watches as that meant they would be considered idle, rather than continuing their education of ship construction by close up work of chipping and painting. No time off for studying, knock off 1800 in the saloon by 1900, back on deck at 2000 to stow steamer chairs, then study if you could keep your eyes open.

In port down WCSA temps 90 -100f down the hatches cargo watching making sure no cargo overstowed or over carried, keeping an eye on 20 - 30 tough stevedores (versus 1 x 16 yr old) to prevent them pilfering pilfering, normal stretch down a hatch 14 -18 hours with 30 minute meal breaks. Then off course there was the derrick and jumbo work, not saying I didn't enjoy it at the time, we knew no better. It was only after joining other companies you saw how it should be done.

After finishing my time my next deep sea ship was one of Ropners, cadets got paid overtime and in the afternoon, I taught them chartwork, semaphore, morse and aldis lamps and other subjects. If they wanted to, in the evenings they would go on the foc'le and I would send them messages on the all round morse lamp, if no ships in the vicinity. The accommodation was good, the food was good and the Masters and C/O's (apart from one) had an interest in their officers and cadets progress.
Always did hear stories of apprentice hardship in a certain company down WCSA!! In my pre sea college we had an officer who had served years there and he was forever saying: If you guys have any idea of going into that outfit, forget it.
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  #37  
Old 15th July 2019, 19:53
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Ian J. Huckin Ian J. Huckin is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barrie Youde View Post
#11

The principle, surely, is that there's no accounting for taste!

Some see beauty in large modern cruise liners and private moror-yachts (generally known as gin palaces); while others, at least equally in pursuit of pleasure, abhor such things. One man's meat is another man's poison.
I always worked on the assumption that one man's meat was another man's meat...given half the chance!!!
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  #38  
Old 15th July 2019, 20:23
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Originally Posted by Ian J. Huckin View Post
I always worked on the assumption that one man's meat was another man's meat...given half the chance!!!
Or these days, One man's beef is another man's cunningly disguised horse.
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  #39  
Old 15th July 2019, 21:24
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Robert Hilton Robert Hilton is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barrie Youde View Post

The principle, surely, is that there's no accounting for taste!

Some see beauty in large modern cruise liners and private moror-yachts (generally known as gin palaces).
Motor yachts are now sex barges. We called them that in the 50's.
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  #40  
Old 16th July 2019, 19:39
Davie M Davie M is offline  
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Originally Posted by Robert Hilton View Post
Motor yachts are now sex barges. We called them that in the 50's.
Coming from Morningside we generally have dinner at sex
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  #41  
Old 16th July 2019, 20:51
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Pat Kennedy Pat Kennedy is offline  
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Originally Posted by Frank P View Post
If the apprentices/cadets were doing all this woodwork what was the carpenter doing?

Frank

Hardly woodwork Frank.
More like painting and decorating I would have thought, and on some ships it was pure makee workee like polishing the ship's bell on the focsle with cotton waste and Rose's Lime juice, which was favoured by many Blue Flue bosuns to keep the deck boy out of mischief in the afternoons.
Pat
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