Ships engineers after seagoing - Ships Nostalgia
10:30

Welcome
Welcome!Welcome to Ships Nostalgia, the world's greatest online community for people worldwide with an interest in ships and shipping. Whether you are crew, ex-crew, ship enthusiasts or cruisers, this is the forum for you. And what's more, it's completely FREE.

Click here to go to the forums home page and find out more.
Click here to join.
Log in
User Name Password

Ships engineers after seagoing

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 29th October 2019, 13:00
KeithGladman KeithGladman is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 1
Smile Ships engineers after seagoing

I have met a few people who have done some time at sea. Generally those who carried on in engineering. I moved intyo gas turbine control systems.
What areas did others move into after seagoing?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 29th October 2019, 16:01
kewl dude's Avatar
kewl dude kewl dude is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Other Merchant Fleets
Department: Engineering
Active: 1960 - 1976
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,619
My Dad sailed the Great Lakes 1937-1971 as an engineer when he retired @ age 58. Dad always wanted to go sail offshore, but his wife, my Mother, vehemently objected so he never did. Ashore he spent two years doing everything to his home and environs he was unable to do while he was sailing. Then casting about for something to do he joined Radisson Hotels as Chief Engineer and worked another fifteen years before retiring again.

I grew up spending the bulk of summer school vacations onboard with my Dad. Against my Dad's better wishes - No Son of Mine Will Ever Sail - my Mom used her industry connections to arrange my original Merchant Marine Document. At the time one needed a letter of a job commitment from a Great Lakes shipping company to obtain said USCG original document.

I sailed the lakes 1960-1966 going from Coalpasser/wiper to third assistant engineer. When 'Nam came along there was a severe Marine Engineer shortage, so severe that ships were loaded and crewed but unable to sail due to a lack of Marine Engineers.

September 1966 the MEBA - Marine Engineers Beneficial Association - union rep came aboard in Buffalo, NY. He brought with him front pages from San Francisco newspapers picturing loaded ships with 'Nam cargo rafted together in San Francisco Bay. He waved the US Flag around - figuratively speaking - so I quit that day and sailed offshore until 1976 post 'Nam. When I came ashore and went to work for Westin Hotels.

I began as an hourly Maintenance Engineer, 1978 I was promoted to a newly created position of hourly Assistant Chief Engineer, 1981 I was the first to be appointed to the newly created salary position of Energy Manager. Later I was Chief Engineer, Life Safety and Energy Manager.

1990 vested in three Westin pensions, hourly, salary and 401K I left Westin and opened my own successful one person Computer Tutor business. I was the only independent Computer Tutor - some colleges offered computer instruction - in my area encompassing about a half million population, and very busy.

2002, with then a lot of computer tutor competition and qualified to begin taking Social Security I did so. I then volunteered at two local non-profits as photographer, newsletter editor and webmaster at a surfing museum and antique gas and steam engine museum, until I quit @ age 72. My 79th birthday will be December this year.

Greg Hayden
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 29th October 2019, 17:56
ART6's Avatar
ART6 ART6 is offline   SN Supporter
Super Moderator
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1958 - 1970
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 3,485
Ashore to my grief upon marriage and a baby on the way (well after the wedding!). Then deputy chief engineer in a power station in London. Then down to Sussex to become principal mechanical engineer of a county council, tasked with privatising their plant and vehicle maintenance division of 1,400 vehicles. On then to become the engineering director of a company expanding into waste disposal, and moving on again to be technical director of a PLC building biofuels plants.

On again to form my own company with four colleagues, and taking contracts to build two new and large biofuels plants and an organic wastes process plant before being part-acquired by an USA multinational. When the multinational decided to pull the plug and concentrate on their core business I too pulled the plug and retired (at the young age of seventy-two).

I never understood how all of this happened because I just flowed with the tide, but it seems that a chief's ticket had some value in those days?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 29th October 2019, 19:19
norm.h's Avatar
norm.h norm.h is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1955 - 1960
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 228
First job ashore [1960] was as a maintenance fitter in a chemical works making silicones. Stayed there for 3 years.

Then went as a maintenance fitter to a brand new power station in South Wales.
Stayed there for 6 years, rising to shift chargehand, until getting promotion to maintenance foreman at another new power station in Oxfordshire.

Stayed there for 22 years, until taking voluntary redundancy aged 57.

Then spent 12 years as a volunteer advisor at the local Citizen's Advice.
Since then just dossing and enjoying retirement.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 29th October 2019, 22:01
Pat Kennedy's Avatar
Pat Kennedy Pat Kennedy is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 14,086
When I worked in Cammel Lairds in the 60s and 70s, most of the ship repair fitters were ex marine engineers,and my brother Jimmy was one of them.
After a few years at sea with Blue Funnel and Cunard, he came ashore to get married and immediately got a start in Lairds, becoming chargehand after a year or two. We often worked together, me up the crane, lowering pistons and other shiny things through the engine room skylight, to Jimmy and his crew down the pit.
After Lairds folded, Jimmy went to work in Unilever as a plant fitter, then on to the Pharmaceutical firm, Squibbs, again as plant fitter.
He retired at 65 having spent his whole working life "playing with Meccano"
__________________
"Life is a waste of time, and time is a waste of life. Get wasted all the time, and you'll have the time of your life!"

Last edited by Pat Kennedy; 29th October 2019 at 22:44..
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 29th October 2019, 23:33
Basil's Avatar
Basil Basil is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1962 - 1964
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 4,302
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat Kennedy View Post
When I worked in Cammel Lairds in the 60s and 70s, most of the ship repair fitters were ex marine engineers,and my brother Jimmy was one of them.
After a few years at sea with Blue Funnel and Cunard, he came ashore to get married and immediately got a start in Lairds, becoming chargehand after a year or two. We often worked together, me up the crane, lowering pistons and other shiny things through the engine room skylight, to Jimmy and his crew down the pit.
After Lairds folded, Jimmy went to work in Unilever as a plant fitter, then on to the Pharmaceutical firm, Squibbs, again as plant fitter.
He retired at 65 having spent his whole working life "playing with Meccano"
As a collegue said: "I never did a day's work in my life." Meaning he liked his job.

In my second profession, I took my BiL for a ride in a TriStar simulator. His verdict: "The best Atari game I've ever seen!"
Gave me food for thought did that . . . .
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 29th October 2019, 23:42
Basil's Avatar
Basil Basil is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1962 - 1964
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 4,302
Quote:
Originally Posted by ART6
it seems that a chief's ticket had some value in those days
As, indeed, it should, then and today!

Bas - Part A Second class
It was a bit annoying that we weren't permitted to even take the exams until we had the sea time. (My apprenticeship was light & medium) In civil aviation, a candidate may take the senior licence (Airline Transport Pilot Licence) exams and be issued with a frozen ATPL until the requisite hours are achieved.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 29th October 2019, 23:44
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 6,923
Likewise, I've never done a day's work in my life. I've enjoyed the whole bang-shoot!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 29th October 2019, 23:54
Wallace Slough Wallace Slough is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Other Merchant Fleets
Department: Navigation
Active: 1963 - 2010
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 1,833
Here here Barrie! You sound like a retired pilot!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 30th October 2019, 00:27
OilJiver OilJiver is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1973 - 2009
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 993
Quote:
Originally Posted by Basil View Post
..a bit annoying that we weren't permitted to even take the exams until we had the sea time....
For all the maths/physics type stuff I agree Bas. But pretty essential for sure to get plenty hands on/operational stuff done before being eligible to sit exams for CoC.
Always remember DTI examiner explaining to me about the drop in standard of candidates up for first (Class 4) tickets…
”not their fault these young boys….you remember how it was when we were boys?....we study hard for 4 years, at end of which we know fcuk all!...Now they barely get study half that time….now they know double fcuk all!...”
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 30th October 2019, 01:01
Basil's Avatar
Basil Basil is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1962 - 1964
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 4,302
Quote:
Originally Posted by OilJiver View Post
For all the maths/physics type stuff I agree Bas. But pretty essential for sure to get plenty hands on/operational stuff done before being eligible to sit exams for CoC.
Always remember DTI examiner explaining to me about the drop in standard of candidates up for first (Class 4) tickets…
”not their fault these young boys….you remember how it was when we were boys?....we study hard for 4 years, at end of which we know fcuk all!...Now they barely get study half that time….now they know double fcuk all!...”
Sorry if I've misunderstood but I meant that you could pass the exams but the certificate would not be issued until you had the BoT required sea time.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 30th October 2019, 01:42
makko's Avatar
makko makko is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1979 - 1998
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
My location
Posts: 5,831
I did my time and certs up to 2/E. Then ashore, various things and an engineering project consultancy business. Mechanical expert/site engineering converting a dual fuel power station to coal, ISO 9001 in a velvet manufacturer, CAD/CAM instructor in B'head, Water treatment (Chief Designer) 5 years. Now Regional Engineer Lat Am/Senior Adjuster for a worldwide adjusting firm. Still keep my hand in with Hull & Machinery and ship inspections. Just the other week, investigating an allision incident at an LNG terminal here in Mexico.

Both daughters in University: No.1 studying law in Mexico (5 years) and No.2 just started Psychological Science in Italy. Maybe, Job done!

Job & knock! Is that the signal for Smoko?! No time for retirement though, 57 years old. They will have to drag me screaming off to the netherworld.

Cheers,
Dave
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 30th October 2019, 07:45
kewl dude's Avatar
kewl dude kewl dude is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Other Merchant Fleets
Department: Engineering
Active: 1960 - 1976
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,619
I didn't think about it when I was writing. Original 3 A/E 1966, 2 A/E 1968, 1 A/E 1970- C/E 1972. But I never sailed Chief. 1-I was to young for a desk job & 2-as 1 A/E I earned at least twice and sometimes 3 times that of the C/E. By contract C/E was not paid OT, but all assistants were.

Greg Hayden
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 30th October 2019, 09:54
Basil's Avatar
Basil Basil is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1962 - 1964
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 4,302
Quote:
Originally Posted by kewl dude View Post
I didn't think about it when I was writing. Original 3 A/E 1966, 2 A/E 1968, 1 A/E 1970- C/E 1972. But I never sailed Chief. 1-I was to young for a desk job & 2-as 1 A/E I earned at least twice and sometimes 3 times that of the C/E. By contract C/E was not paid OT, but all assistants were.

Greg Hayden
On my first ship we were on 'B' articles which paid overtime (cf 'A' articles which didn't but had a higher basic - allegedly)
B&W 4-stroke with large pitted exhaust valves which really needed to go ashore for grinding and THEN lapping in.
2/E set me to lapping them in - which was well nigh impossible - but I was happy to stand, earning overtime, increasing upper body strength and ruining my lungs (smoked then). Unfortunately, the CE found out about this waste of funding and put a stop to it
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 30th October 2019, 11:22
Engine Serang Engine Serang is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1970 - Present
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,130
[QUOTE=kewl dude; I never sailed Chief.

Greg Hayden[/QUOTE]

I did, and it's not all its made up to be.

Demanding Masters
Useless Seconds
Kranky Thirds
Drunken Leckys
White Crew
And the nightmare goes on. Burra Sahib's head is uneasy.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 30th October 2019, 12:03
Varley's Avatar
Varley Varley is offline   SN Supporter
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Active: 1971 - 2011
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 9,760
I would prefer drinking or piss artist to drunken.

Not an estate altogether reserved for those with less than four rings.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 30th October 2019, 12:31
Engine Serang Engine Serang is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1970 - Present
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,130
What will we do with the Piss Artist sailor
What will we do with the Piss Artist sailor
What will we do with the Piss Artist sailor
Earliy in the morning.


Doesn't quite have the ring about it.


And as for Sparky ??????
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 30th October 2019, 12:37
Varley's Avatar
Varley Varley is offline   SN Supporter
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Active: 1971 - 2011
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 9,760
You didn't mention Sparky so I thought better of reminding you.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 3rd November 2019, 04:19
Basil's Avatar
Basil Basil is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1962 - 1964
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 4,302
Quote:
Originally Posted by Engine Serang View Post
I did, and it's not all its made up to be.

Demanding Masters
Useless Seconds
Kranky Thirds
Drunken Leckys
White Crew
And the nightmare goes on. Burra Sahib's head is uneasy.
Useless Seconds - Had one on my first trip to sea. I was a bit shocked when the Chief referred to him when speaking to me, a little junior, as 'A big cnut!'

Drunken Leckys - Had one of those.

White Crew - Only ever sailed with British crew. Recollect complaining to someone, over cocktails, about Liverpool crew. He said I should try a London crew before I complained about any others
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 4th November 2019, 03:42
Irvingman Irvingman is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1973 - 1991
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 413
Quote:
Originally Posted by Basil View Post
. As, indeed, it should, then and today.
I started with Denholms in 1973, leaving as Chief deep sea in 1991. Unfortunately by that time shore based engineering had moved on, specialisation was required, electronics and computerised systems were the norm, H&S practices ashore were very different and just using common sense wasn't seen as sufficient. I felt that I'd been left behind and was seen as a "jack of all trades and master of none".
After 12 months of failed interviews and umpteen unanswered CV's I took myself off to the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne and sat their degree in Marine Technology, graduated and was accepted for the first job I applied for.
Was it the degree or just the timing? - Not sure.
Ended up as Engineering Project Manager looking after capital projects for a multi-national food manufacturer (you've probably drunk their coffee!)
I certainly feel I could have held that and earlier posts with the practical knowledge and approach to work gained as a seagoing Chief Engineer. The acedemic knowledge gained at University, while of interest, was hardly ever called upon in the positions I held.
The only area where I struggled was learning to moderate my language when dealing with f***wits!!!
John

Last edited by Irvingman; 4th November 2019 at 03:46..
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 5th November 2019, 14:29
D1566's Avatar
D1566 D1566 is offline  
Senior Member
Department: Engineering
Active: 1978 - 1990
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 259
Did about 5 years at sea after cadetship, then spent the last 30 years in the oil industry
__________________
Martin Perry
Professional Chancer.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 17th January 2020, 15:57
KernowJim's Avatar
KernowJim KernowJim is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1980 - Present
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 116
I did a 4 year apprenticeship shoreside in Aberdeen and then managed to get a job as 5th Engineer Deep Sea in 1980.
6 Years and a 2nd Engineers ticket later I decided that the shorter trips and increased wages the offshore industry offered was the way forward and so commenced working on Dive Ships.
10 years later, after getting married I decided, well the wife did!, that working nearer to home would be better and so got a job as Chief Engineer on the local Bunker Tanker. After the children were born I became a house husband for 6 years and then worked as a self employed Rig Mechanic for a local firm on Geotechnical Drilling Ships.
Still with the company, 13 years later, and working ashore as a Vessel Supervisor.
Just can't cope with being away from the sea or ships for any length of time.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 18th January 2020, 00:40
george e mitchell george e mitchell is online now  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1962 - 1970
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 120
ANOTHER Aberdonian, SERVED 5 year apprenticeship in the Aberdeen shipyard, John Lewis. Joined Shaw Savill as junior engineer, in 1962.
Left 1971 after sailing as 2nd eng for three years, Made redundant as the merchant navy was in serious decline.

I decided to join the oil industry with an American supply boat company in Yarmouth. Did one trip as 2nd then Chief for my second trip,

Was sent to standby four new anchor handlers all 8000 H,P being built in HULL,

I spent 2 years sailing as chief on these vessels.working out of my home HOME PORT Aberdeen,

I was promoted to PORT ENGINEER looking after hull and engine maintenance, drydocking etc

That company was taken over and they wanted me and my family to locate in Singapore.
I rejected this as my wifes parents and mine were elderly and required support which we did

I joined a pipe hauler as Chief Engineer, that lasted a year then she sent to ROTTERDAM to be converted into a diving support ship, STAR CANOPUS
I spent 6 months during the conversion month / month then sailed as chief engineer.

To get more regular time at home I decided to get a job on the oil rigs.
TWO WEEKS ON ,TWO WEEKS OFF. my first rig was the Tharos, stood by the building in Japan, did tow to UK then stayed there for two years,

REturned to Korea, stood by rig ,did tow and was chief engineer on that rig for 15 years
Then transferred to another sister rig that needed bringing up to UK requirements Stayed there 11 years

My wife was diagnosed with a terminal illness and given six months at most.

The company offered me leave of absence, which I declined That was year 2000 I became her carer till she died in 2014

In between time did part time rig survey work in the Moray firth, 3 day surveys. when required for the next two years,

Then became full time carer for my wife, after her death I started doing elderly peoples gardens and paint fences round about my house etc,

Which I still do to passaway the time, Im now 79 and it keeps me going

All the best to all for 2020,

Last edited by george e mitchell; 18th January 2020 at 00:53.. Reason: correct spacing
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 18th January 2020, 05:32
spongebob's Avatar
spongebob spongebob is offline
Spongebob
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1957 - 1961
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 9,010
I came ashore to get married and took a temporary job as a technical sales clerk in the Auckland Branch of NZ's biggest engineering importer ,John Chambers and son , whose agencies included Babcock boilers , Gardner diesels, spirax steam traps, Bailey meters and controls, Laurence Scott electric motors,
Tange steam engines, Dowson and Mason incinerators , Esse stoves to name a few.
My job was to handle phone sales of electric motors and attent to anyone straying on to the show floor .
I worked for one week before taking a week off to get married and on return I was offered a course at Bailey Meters Sydney to train as an instrument engineer.
This lasted for twelve months by which time I had sorted out various miss applications and reached the limit of sales under the stringent import licensing system then in place.
I had worked myself out of a job so the next plan was for me to go to Spirax UK to train as a steam trap expert but the course did not start for some months so in the meantime I was loaned to Babcock NZ who had offices in the Same building and to fill in for a sales engineer who has gone on long term sick leave.
I was thrown in to the deep end there , having to prepare sales tenders for boiler plant against client and consultants specifications while facing opposition from NEI-John Thompson , Foster Wheeler , Cochran of Annan etc but soon won through on a contract to re- boiler a large Auckland Hospital and others.
By this time the engineer on sick leave had resigned and I was offered the Babcock job in late 1961.
There I stayed until 1976 when a 'Hobson's Choice' promotion saw me opt out and join another engineer- merchant in the electrical and machine tools field.
I became Auckland branch manager after a couple of years until head hunted by Babcock back to my old job. One that I had enjoyed and had ever missed.
Babcock UK's take over by FKI saw the closure of many overseas branches of the company and I joined our private boiler manufacturing company as Babcock licensees and a director until retirement in 1994.
A mundane career but one I enjoyed over the years but after 26 years in retirement I must admit that I now know more about gardening than I do about steam!
__________________
spongebob,

Last edited by spongebob; 18th January 2020 at 05:37..
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 29th January 2020, 22:32
george e mitchell george e mitchell is online now  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1962 - 1970
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 120
SpongeBob
.
Like you I have been retired for over twenty years, I also know more about gardens NOW than I do about Motor and Steam,

But I do keep my hand in my Motor knowledge by maintaining my twenty year old car, and the grand childrens older runabouts For my steam time im
in charge of the electric kettle for making tea or coffee, and as for elect work, keep my late wifes ten year old disability scooter in good nick.

Give it a run down to the shop at least once a month. in case I ever need it myself one day.

ALL THE BEST / GEM.

Last edited by george e mitchell; 29th January 2020 at 22:48..
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off




Support SN


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.