Merchant Navy Fare - merged threads - Page 13 - Ships Nostalgia
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Merchant Navy Fare - merged threads

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  #301  
Old 15th August 2007, 12:28
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andysk andysk is offline   SN Supporter
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Aaaah !

Kromeskis a la Russe

Pigs in Blankets

Clan Line Spew aka sandwich spread

Connyonnie (sp ?)

One egg a day, and picking the lock on the galley doors for more to hard boil in the bridge kettle at night.

Being on Hector Heron away from the usual routes meaning an (almost) unlimited feeding rate.

Watching the PCO, out of his brain one lunchtime, go face first into the tomato soup, then stagger off to his cabin with his shorts on back to front (how he achieved that nobody ever found out !) He was a good feeder though !

Aaah ! memories
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  #302  
Old 15th August 2007, 12:41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chouan View Post
"Kromeskies a la Russe" for example.
Or Oxtail Jardinaire! = Cows a r s e in the garden!!!!

Steve.
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  #303  
Old 15th August 2007, 13:38
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The things we ate onboard. Menus.

I still remember (with fondness) a breakfast dish which consisted of chopped up kidney in a rich brown sauce served on fried bread.

I have tried for years to order it in whilst eating out, asking chefs if they had a name for it, and trying to find a recipe.

Can anybody out there help? An ex Harrison Chief Steward or Chief Cook could probabaly help.

Peter (Pat) Baker.
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  #304  
Old 15th August 2007, 13:42
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Probably "devilled kidneys", it was offal but I liked it too.

John T.
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  #305  
Old 15th August 2007, 13:51
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Haven't we already had a thread on this subject under 'Merchant Navy Fare', I seem to recall many of the delicacies mentioned there.
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  #306  
Old 15th August 2007, 13:52
Peter Fielding Peter Fielding is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter (Pat) Baker View Post
I still remember (with fondness) a breakfast dish which consisted of chopped up kidney in a rich brown sauce served on fried bread.

I have tried for years to order it in whilst eating out, asking chefs if they had a name for it, and trying to find a recipe.

Can anybody out there help? An ex Harrison Chief Steward or Chief Cook could probabaly help.

Peter (Pat) Baker.
Sounds a bit like what B.I. used to dish up as "Kidney Turbigo." (Kidneys that have been through the turbine?)
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  #307  
Old 15th August 2007, 14:23
K urgess K urgess is offline
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Always good to revisit a favourite subject, awateah2.
One of the first questions was always "Is she a good feeder?".

I did see a tin of devilled kidneys in Tesco's once. Probably been removed now under some Euro PC directive or other. I'll have a hunt next time I volunteer to brave the battleground.

Just like the army marches on it's stomach it applies even more to afloat. Our foraging trips for fresh tucker were a bit more limited.
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  #308  
Old 15th August 2007, 15:08
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Totally agree , so if we re-open the original thread it avoids repetition but rekindles memories
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  #309  
Old 15th August 2007, 15:46
WilliamH WilliamH is offline  
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When I was on Cory's ore carriers, Knightsgarth, Monksgarth and Dukesgarth, curry and rice was always served at breakfast time. Also on the Knightsgarth the highlight of the week, Saturday tea time we had salmon and chips, i.e half a tin of salmon usally still in the round form as it had come out of the can with chips.
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  #310  
Old 15th August 2007, 20:39
clankie clankie is offline
 
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Ah hhhh I can see and smell it now, devilled kidneys, aka s**t on a raft.
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  #311  
Old 15th August 2007, 20:44
alexmackinnon alexmackinnon is offline  
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Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by clankie View Post
Ah hhhh I can see and smell it now, devilled kidneys, aka s**t on a raft.
Hi Clankie, I remember the first time I heard it called s**t on a raft, I almost choked on it.
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  #312  
Old 15th August 2007, 20:44
clankie clankie is offline
 
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Ah hhhh I can see and smell it now, kidney turbigo, aka s**t on a raft or "babies heads" also known as steak and kidney pudding.

Last edited by clankie; 15th August 2007 at 20:48..
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  #313  
Old 15th August 2007, 20:47
ARRANMAN35 ARRANMAN35 is offline  
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Devilled Kidneys

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marconi Sahib View Post
Always good to revisit a favourite subject, awateah2.
One of the first questions was always "Is she a good feeder?".

I did see a tin of devilled kidneys in Tesco's once. Probably been removed now under some Euro PC directive or other. I'll have a hunt next time I volunteer to brave the battleground.

Just like the army marches on it's stomach it applies even more to afloat. Our foraging trips for fresh tucker were a bit more limited.
Hi, No longer stocked by Tesco, have been told that Morrisons have them, Happy hunting.
Archie.
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  #314  
Old 15th August 2007, 22:17
sparkie2182 sparkie2182 is offline  
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snake and pygmy pie.............

and on the brock boats............

indian crew curry................there was always a "less powerfull" european version available, but the bandhari always supplied the nuclear powered indian curry for the more discerning palates........straight from the crew mess.......

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  #315  
Old 15th August 2007, 22:50
Derbyroy Derbyroy is offline  
 
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MN Fare

Surely all hands here assembled must have been told at signing on ANY
Ship , That the food was "Sunday dinner Every day" and " Christmas Dinner Every Sunday", at least thats what we were promised .........
Most Tankers were great some of the Cargo vessels left a lot to the imagination.
But Steak on Saturday afternoons was best..
regards
Derby
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  #316  
Old 15th August 2007, 23:22
sparkie2182 sparkie2182 is offline  
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with cunard it was pub lunch on saturday..............

and steaks for dinner...............


yum
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  #317  
Old 15th August 2007, 23:58
K urgess K urgess is offline
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Although the food was great on VLCCs, including free wine, you could tell the day of the week by the menu most of the time.
If it was steak it was either Thursday or Sunday.
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  #318  
Old 16th August 2007, 12:39
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I did once order devilled kidney for lunch in a very upmarket pub.

This turned out to be a couple of whole kidneys fried (or grilled) in some sort of hot spices.

Whilst it was quite decent it was not a patch on the s..t on a raft of glorious memory.

I am still hoping that somebody will be able to supply us all with a recipe.

Peter (Pat) Baker.
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  #319  
Old 16th August 2007, 13:16
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Hi Pat ...

Here's one : http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/da...oa_85068.shtml

Not sure how many Cooks would have done it this way, it's probably a bit upmarket for most of them of my acquaintance !

I did stay at a great B&B in Osmington Mills (near Weymouth) a few years ago, she served them for breakfast without warning, nobody else was very happy, but I thought it was great, and managed four portions !

Cheers

Andy
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  #320  
Old 20th August 2007, 13:26
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Andy,

many thanks for your reply, and the recipes.

They sound great and I will definitely try them.

However, the dish I am thinking of was chopped kidney in a rich brown sauce (beefy) and served on fried bread rather than toast.

I will live in hope that we may all receive that recipe eventually.

As I said earlier and old Harrison Line Chief Steward or cook may supply this.

Regards,

Peter (Pat) Baker.
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  #321  
Old 20th August 2007, 14:00
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I sailed with a chief steward - John "Raviolli" Rout - in Kuwait Shipping Company - what a character!
Apparently on one ship he put on Sausage 'n Mash for evening dinner and the Old Man took offence and said it was a dinner only fit for peasants - "Ravi" then repeated this meal (after I'd joined) but called it Peasants Delight! - I was on the quick 15 meal break then back to get the Portishead traffic list - so read the menu as Pheasant Delight - "Ummm - I'll have some of that" thought I.
What a disappointment.

Regards,

Steve.
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  #322  
Old 20th August 2007, 14:10
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Folks

Most dishes/fare has been mentioned and it's a great thread. Different companies had their different specialities; the recipe for the MN renowned 'Cheese Beanos' varied from both company and cook. But has anyone heard of "chuck Wagon Grinder"?

This was a dish associated with Shell tankers - well when i was there anyway in mid eighties. Not sure if it's known outside of MN circles? It consists of:

1.Half a bread bap (made fresh on board), this is then slightly grilled (i prefer to grill both sides as it keeps it crispy). A spreading of butter is optional.
2. A circle of processed ham is placed on this.
3. Then a ring of pineapple (drained of juice) placed on the ham.
4. Spoon an even layer of freshly made coleslaw on top (not too drenched with mayo).
5. Grate some chedder cheese on top.
6. Then place under the grill untill the cheese is bubbling and slightly brown in colour.

Is your mouth watering? It's good folks, believe me.

Mick S

Last edited by Mick Spear; 20th August 2007 at 14:12..
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  #323  
Old 20th August 2007, 16:30
Chouan Chouan is offline  
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Whelan View Post
Seeking receipe for Panagalty, spelling may be incorrect.
My mother's (Gateshead), and grandmother's (Hartlepool) version:
Potato, onion, corned beef, sliced and layered in a dish, well seasoned with salt and pepper, covered with stock and then cooked in an oven until the potatoes are done. Ideally served onto slices of bread to soak up the sauce. I never had it at sea.
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  #324  
Old 20th August 2007, 22:17
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Ron Stringer Ron Stringer is offline
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Panacalty

Don't know the correct spelling either but if you Google "panacalty" you come up with more recipes than you will cook in a month. Mostly the same ingredients, with only minor variations.

Enjoy.
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  #325  
Old 20th August 2007, 22:33
Chouan Chouan is offline  
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek Roger View Post
Hugh ;
I sailed with Les and he was a good feeder ! Not from Dundee though as I was living in Dundee at that time and would have remembered . Les was an "English " but a good lad nonetheless .

Brocklebanks crewed the Mahout from Newport News by sailing us all over to New York on the Queen Elizabeth . ( an error of judgement on the part of head office ; we had a ball ! ) I was 5th Eng at the time and the 3 rd mate was Alex Smith from St Monance in The Kingdom of Fife . He became a very good shipmate . He Andy Brett ( from Dundee ) and myself were all at the same Cabin Class table ; we had to wear our uniforms at meal times to impress the fare paying passengers !

First day at breakfast we were looking at the Menu and Alex Shouts out " Steward you've given me the wrong menu ; this is the luch menu ! Steward takes a look and says " No sir this is the breakfast Menu "
Alex says " Breakfast ??? Who ever heard of Oinion Spoup for Breakfast ???
Much hilarity ensued . Alex then said " keep your soup and bring me a Kipper "

The Old Man ; Chief : Mate and 2nd Eng . all were in first class ; the rest of us in Cabin except the Chippy and apprentices who travelled tourist . Talk about the British Class Distinction . ( I was OK with it when I became Chief ! )
Happy Days Derek
The "Officers' Club" at the American owned Alcoa loading facility at Paranam in Surinam was for Masters and Mates only, so snobbery is not only British.
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