MANGLA on the Hooghli - Page 3 - Ships Nostalgia
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MANGLA on the Hooghli

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  #51  
Old 8th April 2013, 18:46
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Hugh Ferguson Hugh Ferguson is offline  
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Having got into position between the 4 buoys I thought it about 4 hours to complete the moor.
I do not recall the cabled being crossed!?!?
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  #52  
Old 8th April 2013, 19:47
Aberdonian Aberdonian is offline  
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Here is the Southbank moored with apparently crossed cables.
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File Type: jpg Southbank at Hooghly Buoys 1955.jpg (145.9 KB, 87 views)
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  #53  
Old 8th April 2013, 22:11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aberdonian View Post
Here is the Southbank moored with apparently crossed cables.
Definitely I would say, so I must be mistaken, but I cannot really see why it should have been considered necessary
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  #54  
Old 10th April 2013, 07:38
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Seem to think that the moorings at Buj Buj (?). On the explosive berth that the for'd cables weren't crossed had more of a breast lead on them there.
Please note wouldn't swear to this though. Rgds.
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  #55  
Old 10th April 2013, 15:35
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I think the reason they were not crossed at Buj Buj was that the distance fore and aft between the buoys did not permit it. As there was only one explosives berth, all longer ships had to moor without crossed moorings, but, most probably shorter ships would use the traditional crossed moorings.
The biggest delay on mooring was the separation of the chains at the connecting links.
If the link had to be cut out, it was necessary to send for the burning boat to get the necessary equipment to the ship.
The sequence of mooring connections was:
1: Hang Off starboard anchor.
2: Tie up with headlines and stern lines conventionally
3: Connect the starboard chain to the river chain
4: Hang off the port anchor
5: Send a pair of two shackle lengths each of chain from the port anchor onto the chain boats for the aft moorings
6. Connect the port chain to the river chain
7. Slack the forward chains and ropes to allow the ship to move astern.
8. Bring the ends of the aft chains up through the hawse pipes, if fitted, or through the ordinary rope leads if not, and make fast around the bits in the same manner as a rope, while making the other end of each chain fast to the river chain.
9. Tighten the forward chains to bring tension onto the after chains.

The mooring boats were totally hand powered and chain was brought up by a large crew working a traditional capstan.

Ian
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  #56  
Old 10th April 2013, 17:46
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Ian, many thanks. That's cleared my recollections of the mooring operations. Rgds.
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  #57  
Old 10th April 2013, 19:24
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But remember to leave the clear run for the after tackles with a good lead to the mooring winch (if the surge came and the tackles hadn't taken enough slack in, the sparks really flew). a four fold coir could part like a whisper if you weren't careful.
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  #58  
Old 18th April 2013, 14:04
noel grayson noel grayson is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Philthechill View Post
"Nobby", if I may be so familiar! How long did all this take? I was only "on the buoys", (Maipura I think), once and can't remember how long it took to do all that incredibly laborious, (and extremely hot!!!), work!

The ship was, of course, under main steam so we engineers just carried-out our normal watches.

However I DO seem to remember it taking several hours of very hard work. Salaams Phil
Phil. Remind me who "Philthechill" is!
This could take anything up to six/seven hours, and then, if the bore was really heavy, take another six hours to un moor and move to Kidderpore. By heavy, I mean the aft mooring bits being ripped out of the deck! Ah, happy memories. Salaams, Nobby
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  #59  
Old 18th April 2013, 14:07
noel grayson noel grayson is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hugh Ferguson View Post
Having got into position between the 4 buoys I thought it about 4 hours to complete the moor.
I do not recall the cabled being crossed!?!?
Sorry Hugh, Cables always crossed
Salaams "Nobby" Grayson
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  #60  
Old 18th April 2013, 14:44
noel grayson noel grayson is offline  
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Originally Posted by Philthechill View Post
Steven! Wonderful idea!!!

There is no doubt "Mangla" and "Mathura" were the best "Brock" ships-----ever!!!! Well-worthy of being painted!!!

"Pem" (Captain Phil Pembridge----lovely man), used to refer to these two ships as "Brock's stately homes".

He was right!

Brilliant engine-room, an actual surfeit of electrical-power, (a first for ANY ship-surely!!!), with their superb Allen alternators and Bellis and Morcombe, (spelling?), turbo-alternator handling ALL electrical-power at sea.

Superb Foster-Wheeler "D" type (?) boilers. Absolute joy to manoeuvre with those big, chrome-plated vertical wheels-----the list of "pluses" for we engineers was endless.

I well-remember, after a particularly long "docking-in-Kidapore" and post tying-up/shutting-down, being saught-out by "Pem" and congratulated on "excellent-manoeuvering, Phil----thank you!".

"Mangla" was my last Brock ship before being posted to the ACL ships.

I look forward to seeing the finished painting as she was definitely my favourite!

I actually have a painitng of "Mangla" I commissioned from a chap in Liverpool called Ossie Jones. He's painted her leaving Colombo. He asked me if there was anything I would likem included in the painting to give me that little bit "extra" to make the painting just that little more "personal".

I mentioned the old "Sam" boat ("Valiant Faith") which had been tied-up at the breakwater for many years. He researched the ship and sure enought there, in the background, is the rusting hulk of the "Faith".

I REALLY look-forward to seeing the painting of "Mangla" tying-up at the buoys. Hoogli Bridge in the background or will you be painting her looking down-river? Salaams, Phil
Im sure the "Sam" boat referred to was the "Valiant Enterprise" but at my tender age, I may b wrong (Unlikely!!) Salaams Nobby
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  #61  
Old 21st April 2013, 10:45
Philthechill Philthechill is offline  
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Red face Whoops!

Quote:
Originally Posted by noel grayson View Post
Im sure the "Sam" boat referred to was the "Valiant Enterprise" but at my tender age, I may b wrong (Unlikely!!) Salaams Nobby
Hello Nobby!

First! Who am I?

I am actually Phil Roe and we met in Middlesborough, 1968.

I was 3/E, coasting on "Mahseer". You were aboard, (wearing your "Super's" hat!!!), seeing the skipper (Laurie De Lands----spelling?). You were probably doing a tour of the ship seeing what shape she was in and I was leaning over the rail-------(smokoe-------honest), and you, being the gentleman you are, stopped, introduced yourself and, during a mutual "admiration of the beautiful ship oveer the dock", ("Mangla"), I said how I'd love to sail on her.

You said, much to my surprise, (as I couldn't imagine anyone wanting to leave such a handsome vessel), that deep-sea engineers were wanted as all hands had left the previous voyage.

You forwarded my name to "the-powers-that-be". I paid-off "Mahseer" 2/1/69 and signed-on "Mangla" 6/1/69.

I did two wonderful trips on her before being sent to stand-by "Atlantic Conveyor" being fitted-out at Swan-Hunters. Subsequently I sailed on her and "Causweay".

You are correct re. the "Valiant Enterprise"------where I got the "Faith" from I can't imagine!

I have a book about every "Sam Boat" built and what happened to them, (the subjects people choose to write about--------luckily!).

The "Valiant Enterprise" was built as the "Harold T. Andrews" in 1944. She was taken-over by several owners before being finally abandoned in Colombo in 1960.

She was eventually towed-out to sea and allowed to sink on 23/2/67. Burra salaams, Phil

Last edited by Philthechill; 22nd April 2013 at 09:30..
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  #62  
Old 22nd April 2013, 11:04
noel grayson noel grayson is offline  
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Originally Posted by Philthechill View Post
Hello Nobby!

First! Who am I?

I am actually Phil Roe and we met in Middlesborough, 1968.

I was 3/E, coasting on "Mahseer". You were aboard, (wearing your "Super's" hat!!!), seeing the skipper (Laurie De Lands----spelling?). You were probably doing a tour of the ship seeing what shape she was in and I was leaning over the rail-------(smokoe-------honest), and you, being the gentleman you are, stopped, introduced yourself and, during a mutual "admiration of the beautiful ship oveer the dock", ("Mangla"), I said how I'd love to sail on her.

You said, much to my surprise, (as I couldn't imagine anyone wanting to leave such a handsome vessel), that deep-sea engineers were wanted as all hands had left the previous voyage.

You forwarded my name to "the-powers-that-be". I paid-off "Mahseer" 2/1/69 and signed-on "Mangla" 6/1/69.

I did two wonderful trips on her before being sent to stand-by "Atlantic Conveyor" being fitted-out at Swan-Hunters. Subsequently I sailed on her and "Causweay".

You are correct re. the "Valiant Enterprise"------where I got the "Faith" from I can't imagine!

I have a book about every "Sam Boat" built and what happened to them, (the subjects people choose to write about--------luckily!).

The "Valiant Enterprise" was built as the "Harold T. Andrews" in 1944. She was taken-over by several owners before being finally abandoned in Colombo in 1960.

She was eventually towed-out to sea and allowed to sink on 23/2/67. Burra salaams, Phil
lHello Phil
Now I remember you! Was it really 1968 where have all the years gone?
Mangla was a lovely ship, I only coasted her, but "my" ship was the Manaar. I was senior app on her maiden voyage , and subsequently sailed as 3/O 2/O and C/O She was the first Brock ship to be fitted with gravity davits (such modern design!) Pity they didn't think of that in 1815 with regard to stern gypsies and mooring cables!
Great to hear from you
Salaams
Nobby
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  #63  
Old 22nd April 2013, 11:17
noel grayson noel grayson is offline  
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Originally Posted by Stephen J. Card View Post
Dear Brocklebankers!

I am planning a painting of MANGLA and the idea is to show her coming to the buoys in Garden Reach. I have a number of questions regarding the mooring proceedure and I am hoping... well, rather certain that all of my questions can be answered here on SN.

I have read the various posts here on the Brocklebank forum re mooring at Garden Reach but I need to clarify a few points.

1. Garden Reach. Did vessels moor on both sides of the Reach ie North bank and South bank or did they favour one side... perhaps South (Calcutta) side?

2. When coming to the buoys did vessels always stem the stream coming to the buoys which meant turning round if required or possibly was a tug used to assist? Or did they always turn and face down stream so as to stem the bore?

3. The stronger bore was during the springs. Did that mean a less complicated moor when the bore was not expected to be strong?

4. How long was the usual port stay in Calcutta?

5. Cargo worked from barges... from both sides of the vessel or did they favour any particular side?

6. I have read the accounts of the moor required on the Hooghli. I would have thought that vessels trading up there would have kept cable at the after end of the vessel to avoid having to break the cables forward and hauling same down aft. Must have been a real work up and make a real mess of the paintwork!

Many thanks all your help.

Stephen
Dear STephen
Have finally found your painting in Maritime Art.
What a painting! Many many congratulations. How I wish I could paint like that. How could I obtain a copy?
All good wishes
Noel
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  #64  
Old 11th January 2014, 01:08
Tony Ellerbeck Tony Ellerbeck is offline  
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Mangla was my first ship having joined as a deck apprentice in Tilbury in '60. A wonderful ship!
Garden Reach always reminds me of the bells of the night watchmen that could be heard onshore at the top of each hour.
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  #65  
Old 31st March 2017, 18:11
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Mangla was also my first ship. Joined in Las Palmas June 17th, 1968. Great ship!
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