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  #1  
Old 11th March 2009, 00:25
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DICK SLOAN DICK SLOAN is offline  
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Favorite Engines

What was your favorite engines to work and why.... while at sea
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  #2  
Old 11th March 2009, 02:00
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The Crossley two strokes. they were a low maintainance Engine and easy to work on. They were also very reliable
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  #3  
Old 11th March 2009, 02:17
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Sulzer RND (8RND90)
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  #4  
Old 11th March 2009, 05:25
Beartracks Beartracks is offline
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Sulzer RLB90 Last of the Loop Scavenged Sulzers. I preferred them to the RTA's that replaced them even though the latter where far more fuel efficient because of their increased bore stroke ratio.
Beartracks
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  #5  
Old 11th March 2009, 06:52
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"What was your favorite engines to work and why.... while at sea"

Work on at sea?

Steam Turbines

Never worked on a steam turbine at sea. Typically the USCG/ABS required turbines be torn down for inspection each five years. Often nothing was done except perhaps adjust diaphragms for wear.

Greg Hayden
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  #6  
Old 11th March 2009, 08:45
J Boyde J Boyde is offline  
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Sulver. Dont remember the model but there is a photo of the engine of the Komata in test in 1947 in the SN. She really earned her life
Jim B
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  #7  
Old 11th March 2009, 08:51
chadburn chadburn is offline  
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To work on at sea?. It has to be a "kiss" Triple Expansion, why? not having to enter a hot crankcase with all the hazards it posed while the ship was rolling around.
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Last edited by chadburn; 11th March 2009 at 09:04.. Reason: word re-alignment.
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  #8  
Old 11th March 2009, 09:54
Fieldsy Fieldsy is offline
 
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Sulzer every time.

Least favourite?

Pielstick - by a country mile.
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  #9  
Old 11th March 2009, 12:07
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Steam turbines every time, never saw the inside of one. Well not at sea. Thanks to Mr Parsons.
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  #10  
Old 11th March 2009, 12:12
Peter Fielding Peter Fielding is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DICK SLOAN View Post
What was your favorite engines to work and why.... while at sea
Anything that didn't need to be worked on at sea, so yes, steam turbines.
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  #11  
Old 11th March 2009, 15:56
Beartracks Beartracks is offline
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All that litters is not Gold.

I by far prefer diesels to Steam Turbines. I served in ships powered by both as well as Liberties Fort type ships and Great Lakers powered by nineteenth century type Triple Expansion Steam Engines (which I loved the best)I was Chief Engineer in a number of steamers in a class built about twenty five years ago for express containerized service to Australia and New Zealand from US East Coast and Gulf Coast ports. The vessels (still in US Coast wise trade and now operated by Horizon Lines)have since operated in multiple trades. I'm informed they are kept in tip-top shape by Horizon the current operator.

I was chief in these ships both for Farrell Lines in the Australian/New Zealand Trades as well as US Lines in US inter coastal/Pacific Rim Far East Trades and found their Westinghouse Turbine Main and Auxiliary Units to be less than dependable as well as poorly designed and configured. When I was in American Marketer ex Austral Ensign the 1500 KW Turbo Generator ran away and tried to crack the sonic barrier after the First Mike "Iron Mike" Baylor slowed the forced draft fans down at FWE Honolulu. Mike had to lean over the turbine casing to manually shut off the steam when the tachometer was just about pegged. He told me it was definitely a spiritual experience. We found problems with the governor steam valve stem as well as the over speed trip latching device. After a fascinating afternoon of experimentation we devised methods of putting the Turbo Unit on of off Line with out having it self destruct. I set a precedent that either the First or myself were to be present during either evolution. I called the home office and also sent a long detailed technical message to the Superintendent Engineer but was told not to call the Classification Society as to quote that gentleman "They'll make us tie the F____G class of ships up". He told me he'd take care of this. Six months after my Honolulu runaway incident the Turbo Generator on the American Merchant a sister ship ran away in Long Beach California and blew shrapnel all over the engine room. Nobody shut the steam valve on that one because nobody had balls as big as "Iron Mikes". Thank God nobody was killed but the Mate did get his neck nicked by a flying turbine blade. I wonder what that bastard was doing in the engine spaces to begin with. It's enough to make one paranoid.

When the American Merchant was the Austral Endurance the quill shaft tying the high speed gear to the intermediate gear on the low pressure side of the cross compounded reduction gear unit failed by shearing in the torsional plane. This was caused by metal fatigue because some "Rocket Scientist" at Westinghouse designed a critical right at the most economical range of the operating RPM. The ship was a day out of Auckland NZ home bound when this happened and was out of service for six months getting the reduction gear unit re-built. Thank God no lives lost in this one either but I'm sure it got the Chief's attention. His name was Billy Leete and he's a good pal of mine. I used to call the US Line Engineering Superintendent who said he was going to fix the over speed problem on the Generator unit Mister McFoul. I didn't call him McFoul to his face but he did constantly use the "F" word a lot. Just about every other word if I remember correctly.

Respectfully submitted;
Hugh D Curran CDR USNS (ret)
former Chief Engineer SS Austral Ensign SS Austral Endurance and SS American Marketer
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  #12  
Old 11th March 2009, 17:01
JoK JoK is offline  
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Skinner Uniflows. Never had to open them except for regulatory.
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  #13  
Old 11th March 2009, 21:04
blurb10 blurb10 is offline  
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DOXFORDS, DOXFORDS,DOXFORDS.....
fOR EASE OF ACCESS AND RELIABILITY...

(40 YEARS EXPERIENCE AS A MARINE ENGINEER AND IN SHIP REPAID.
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  #14  
Old 11th March 2009, 23:45
Beartracks Beartracks is offline
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I wish to post a couple of replies I received from my old boss and friend Don Burnham, Don was the Engineering Superintendent of Delta /Grace Lines out of New Orleans for many years.
Don Burnham to me, Smith, MEBA-Retirees
show details 4:45 PM (43 minutes ago)

Reply1

Westinghouse for years used in commercials the phrase, "You can be sure if it"s Westinghouse.", to which we would add; "Yeah, you can be damned sure. Sure you're going to have problems." I caused me no end of embarrassment that the president of Westinghouse at one time was named Donald Burnham. No relative. We had three ships at Delta Line with Westinghouse equipment. Those ships gave us more problems than the rest of the fleet.
The turbo-gens always had problems with gland seal water getting in the LO. They also had that cup-valve system for the TG governors. A relief Chief Engr took one of the ships out, knowing nothing of the idiosyncrasies of the TGs. When the cycles started falling, he put both TGs on line. Left orders not to centrifuge the oil with the TG on the line, so you can see where this is going. When the vessel was sailing from Paranaqua, the ship took a heavy roll, No.1 TG sucked water into the LO system and wiped ALL the bearings and cycles took a further dip, so this "Chief Engineer" ran down into the engineroom and stops the main engine to raise the cycles!! Now, all of you know stopping the engine has no effect on the cycles, BUT, it sure had an effect on the Captain, who called the Chief on the phone and begged him to give him some turns!! The were sailing through rocks that looked like crocodile teeth. They went into Santos for repairs. Captain was a good friend and was still shaking when I got to Santos.
GE turbines, generator, electrical equipment, the whole brand I have great faith in.
And I still have a love affair with the dear departed Doxford. It was a challenge and I think we both won.
Fraternally,
Donald C. Burnham

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Don Burnham to Lagniappe2, me, James, meba-retirees
show details Mar 9 (2 days ago)

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Hugh -
That Doxford engine was truly loved by a lot of us. I never imagined walkways and lights in the crankcase of an engine!
I spent almost a year on the MS Trans-Gulf, owned and operated by Mississippi Valley Barge Line. It was their only ship. Formerly the Esso Little Rock, Sun Hull 191, she was delivered 1/1941. converted at Alabama DD to a half-assed self-unloader bulk carrier with large deck cranes and a belt system alongside the holds which never worked. Engine was 5 cyl 32" x 40"/55", 8250 BHP Sun-Doxford. That engine was the biggest thing I ever saw. Remember, this was 1965.
I had my brand new Chief Engineer, Steam license and a Third Diesel, and temporarily left Delta Line because I wanted to raise my Motor License to Chief. Then I got on the ship and the only thing on it that was diesel was the main engine! Three boilers. Two turbo-generators exactly like those on an East Coast C-2. Emergency generator was a one-cylinder recip. steam like a Liberty ship generator. Pumps were steam recips or electric centrifugal. And I was the only one onboard who had a Steam License of any sort.
I had made an agreement with the Valley Line Company Rep, who was also the purchasing agent, Port Steward, Port Engineer, you name it, for that ship to be signed on as Observing Chief Engineer, to avoid any hassle with the USCG later on. This pissed the Captain off to a huge extent. Every time we signed on or paid off he would *****, "Chief Engineer. You ain't nothin' but a Third." So he and I got off to a wonderful start.
The above mentioned Co. Rep. would fly ahead to Bombay, Alexandria, Rio, Santos, wherever we were going and grease the skids, so to speak. We got quite friendly. He once told me how little money it took to get priority treatment in most ports. In Rio, we putt-putted in right to the dock while several Delta Line ships laid at anchor. Delta Line had a major office in Rio, but we got to the dock ahead of them.
Me and the other two "Wipers" pulled pistons from 0800 to 2400 in Rio, when I would clean up and run ashore to do some research on the local fauna. Regularly, my good friend the Captain would make remarks at meals about how he was going out to Copacabana to the nightclubs and he would take care of the girls for me, Mr. Chief Engineer. It all evened out when we got to Houston and I paid off with more than the Captain. That SOB was really pissed then.
We spent Christmas at sea and there were no decorations aboard so I made a little Christmas tree. I found a large recip. pump water chest valve and stuck the handle from a toilet plunger into it. Drilled holes at different angles into the handle. I wrapped some welding rods with aluminum foil strips that I had cut one side of to appear like needles, and stuck them in the holes. The Captain went nuts when he saw that and said he now knew I was really stupid. When his wife came aboard the ship in Houston and said how darling and clever the tree was and asked if she could take it home, I magnanimously gave it to her, knowing the Captain would be haunted by it.
I swear, that engine would run on anything. The engine was rigged by Esso as a test engine with heated fuel and steam jacketed oil lines, to try different fuels. We would regularly bunker in Barbados where the oil was blended to around 1500 Redwood. I discovered about two days out of Barbados that no one had remembered to turn the steam back on and we were running on cold oil just fine, thank you. Everytime I think of that ship, I hear the "Chunk-Chunk" of her reciprocating 6 foot diameter scavenging air pump echoing throough the ship's house.
Don
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  #15  
Old 11th March 2009, 23:50
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Macphail Macphail is offline  
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Smile

The best engine I ever sailed with was on the Venetia of Harrison Clyde, 1975, Sulzer RND90 built by IHI Aioi Japan. Main problem was gutting out the upper and lower scavenge spaces and the large amount of reed valves.

I have only sailed on one steam ship, (Kettle and Fan), the big work load in port was a survey on the HP steam drum, therefore the steam turbine was an easy number, plus the fact that 40% of the fuel energy went to the sea via the condenser. Not an engineering challenge just sit back and enjoy it.

John.
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  #16  
Old 12th March 2009, 00:40
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Knowing next to nothing about ships engines, I preferred the ones where you could actually see something going up and down, and the big thick rubber bands that appeared to be doing the work. (Doxford ?) I still like to think of all those engine room crowd winding up the elastic band every night.
My brother who was a marine engineer, loved the steam turbines as found on Blue Funnel 'H' class ships, and also had nice things to say about the diesel/electric engines as found on the Liverpool Pilot Boats, where he served his apprenticeship.
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  #17  
Old 12th March 2009, 09:00
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Satanic Mechanic Satanic Mechanic is offline  
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Steam turbines - Stal and Mitsubishi
Rock Crushers - MAN B&W 6 S70 MCC
Gene's - steam - Stal, diesel Wartilla and the new Hyundai HIMSENS

Don't ever mention Pielsticks, Hedemoras or Paxmans in my company
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  #18  
Old 12th March 2009, 10:07
WilliamH WilliamH is offline  
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My favorite engines were the ones on the aeroplane taking me on leave.
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  #19  
Old 12th March 2009, 10:43
Fieldsy Fieldsy is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Satanic Mechanic View Post
Steam turbines - Stal and Mitsubishi
Rock Crushers - MAN B&W 6 S70 MCC
Gene's - steam - Stal, diesel Wartilla and the new Hyundai HIMSENS

Don't ever mention Pielsticks, Hedemoras or Paxmans in my company
Paxmans - there's a name I'd forgotten. They were the gene's on the ship I did my first three trips on. More prone to water and oil leaks than anything I ever worked on.
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  #20  
Old 12th March 2009, 11:06
Leccy Leccy is offline  
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Originally Posted by R58484956 View Post
Steam turbines every time, never saw the inside of one. Well not at sea. Thanks to Mr Parsons.
I bet you saw plenty of boiler insides though !
Leccy
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  #21  
Old 12th March 2009, 12:57
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Leccy, never went inside a boiler furnace, on P&O we carried a boilermaker and on Cunard never ever had boiler problems, at least on the ship I sailed on.
Only excitment was when BOT had safety valve testing, and when they had gone, screw the SV back down again. Not exactly H&S.
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  #22  
Old 13th March 2009, 21:27
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What about the nine cylinder goteverken with exhuast valves.(It's been a few years, spelling don't look right)
But they were good.
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  #23  
Old 13th March 2009, 23:52
marshynzs marshynzs is offline  
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Sulzer RND, Sulzer RD, in that order,and by a considerable distance.
Steam Turbines/ Turbo Electric, Steam Recip.
B&W GF, Doxford.
Nice to see that Pielstick and Paxmans are as revered as ever!!!!!!
With the past history and reputations of those engines it beggars belief that shipowners would still install such equipment on their ships.
I expect someone on SN will have a good word to say about them although on second thoughts possibly not!!
You may wonder why Doxfords is some way down my list of preferred modes of propulsion,i had two spells on LB types,both elderly and especially so in one case (1939).Both vessels were twin fives and of course on HFO.
Having previously been on B&W four stroke engines those Doxfords were a bit of a revelation masses of impressive moving parts an compared to a Buchi blower very quiet.The volume of work in maintaining those engines was considerable,all units would be overhauled on the NZ/Aus coast plus inspection and adjustments on bottom end and side rod bearings,in short a big work up.For all the work we still had a great time on the NZ coast plus the invaluable experience i gained in the crank case!!!
My first experience of Sulzers was on a coastal run from Swansea to Avonmouth.From the moment that engine fired up i was greatly impressed by the sound and by the whir of the gears,it jist sounded precision and i became hooked on them.I sailed on Sulzers by five different licencees and found them to be first class in all respects,thats not to say they were completely trouble free but nothing too significant.I came ashore in 1968 and had the job of maintaining them and had the job of maintaining them for 16 years.As i have mentiond ,the best engine by far (this should provoke a few comments)!!!!
Marshynzs
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  #24  
Old 14th March 2009, 00:43
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The engineers train of thought is that there are no favourites, .like a bottle of the critter, some are better than others.
The problem I found with the Pielstick was all the potential for leaking joints.
The Doxford was the hoses on the LBD.
The MAN on the big G’s where OK at low revs, normal power, failure.
Understand and treat the engine with respect and you will get a fair return

All the best,
John.
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  #25  
Old 14th March 2009, 00:55
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I must agree with marshynzs with regard to Sulzers but for purely sentimental reasons I'd have to put Doxford LBDs on an equal footing.

Derek
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