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  #176  
Old 14th September 2019, 16:58
Caffj Caffj is offline  
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Organisation: Merchant Navy
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Active: 1953 - 1962
 
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Hello Foca,
Nice to see you are still active and posting some very interesting posts.
Regarding Tom McCutcheon. Never got a reply from him.
Perhaps Western Ferries didn't forward my email on to him, Very disappointed.
The reason for this post is to ask what Booth Line ship Tom was a Master on. If you can remember then please let me know.

Thanks and regards,
Caffj
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  #177  
Old 7th November 2019, 10:22
Foca Foca is offline  
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Memories Past and Present

Pier 1 as we remember it and now.....I wonder if the "Turkey Hero Shop" is still open
Attached Images
File Type: jpg bklynwalk9e.jpg (210.4 KB, 15 views)
File Type: jpg bkwaterfront05.jpg (519.1 KB, 8 views)
File Type: jpg map_screenshot.jpg (23.2 KB, 14 views)
File Type: jpg 275px-BBP_Pier_1_hill_NYWw_jeh.jpg (15.4 KB, 4 views)
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  #178  
Old 7th November 2019, 11:39
P.Arnold P.Arnold is offline
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I remember those Hero Sandwiches. We regularly had them with a pint of milk. I recall them being of quite a size, with various fillings. Probably the forerunner of ĎSubwayí.
Canít remember the name of the shop though.
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  #179  
Old 7th November 2019, 17:10
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duquesa duquesa is offline  
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Booth Line

Quote:
Originally Posted by P.Arnold View Post
I remember those Hero Sandwiches. We regularly had them with a pint of milk. I recall them being of quite a size, with various fillings. Probably the forerunner of ĎSubwayí.
Canít remember the name of the shop though.
I did remember the name until a few years ago but it's gone now like a lot of other stuff!! I'll never forget the first time being taken over there for a Turkey Hero by a third engineer. I'd no idea at the time what I was heading for. Absolutely wonderful.
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  #180  
Old 7th November 2019, 17:13
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duquesa duquesa is offline  
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Booth Line

Looking at the first photograph, I am having trouble remembering those sheds on Pier 1. My recollection was a mainly open wharf area. However, as mentioned above, the grey cells are sometimes misaligned.
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  #181  
Old 10th November 2019, 16:48
Foca Foca is offline  
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Pier One Brooklyn

The quay side was as in the pictures, but there was a big open space behind the sheds
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  #182  
Old 11th November 2019, 09:59
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duquesa duquesa is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foca View Post
The quay side was as in the pictures, but there was a big open space behind the sheds
Yep been thinking about it and now remember the sheds. I think there must have been an open bit at the end of the sheds on the bridge end that we would have walked across when en route to the "hero"!!
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  #183  
Old 12th November 2019, 08:22
Mike Williamson Mike Williamson is offline  
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A Really Big River

Your posts always make we want to give the old lantern yet another swing. I last posted here a couple of years ago, but I keep coming back to dip into the memories, many of which are starting to fade.
Which is why I am so glad I took the trouble to write some of it down a few years ago and I make no apology for re-visiting it.
I hope you enjoy sharing a few of my memories - there are a few links embedded in the narrative which I hope you'll also get to.
Fair winds, shipmates...

http://mike-williamson.blogspot.com/...big-river.html

http://mike-williamson.blogspot.com/...klyn-1996.html
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  #184  
Old 12th November 2019, 09:26
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duquesa duquesa is offline  
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Brilliant. I remember Geoff Laws so well. Almost see him now sitting watching TV with Tom & Gerry.
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  #185  
Old 12th November 2019, 17:46
P.Arnold P.Arnold is offline
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Remember getting the metro over to NY.
Frequenting Toddís Steak House, Flaming Steaks, Radio City, Greenwich Village, and I think, Your Fatherís Moustache.
It seems on reflection, it was all food and drink.
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  #186  
Old 14th November 2019, 12:40
Foca Foca is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P.Arnold View Post
Remember getting the metro over to NY.
Frequenting Toddís Steak House, Flaming Steaks, Radio City, Greenwich Village, and I think, Your Fatherís Moustache.
It seems on reflection, it was all food and drink.
I remember the Your Father's Mustache Club well, used to have a banjo band playing then they used to show old black and white films...beer was served in jugs and you could buy a straw boater...... Also the Piano Bar close by which was a very nice place.
We were in Carteret one weekend not working and we went over to Greenwich Village by bus.....through Holland Tunnel. Remember going back in the early hours with the huge Sunday papers they used to have.
Carteret pier is no longer...but a Water Front Park, looks really nice. The old Army Navy at the end of road has gone replaced by modern houses
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  #187  
Old 14th November 2019, 13:43
P.Arnold P.Arnold is offline
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Ref #186 Foca,
Was It the same Fatherís Moustache that had a mannequin of a Scotsman in kilt, near the ladies toilet. If a customer lifted the kilt, a klaxon would sound and the area flooded by spotlight.
There used to be a YFMoustache near Blackpool,..... I think.
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  #188  
Old 14th November 2019, 14:23
P.Arnold P.Arnold is offline
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Foca yr #174 jogged another memory cell.... or two.

On the Valiente, we had a syndicate that purchased items in New York for sale to Lobras
departmental store and customs at Manaus and Customs at Leticia.
Any transshipment of goods from the UK to W. Indies for onward shipment, particularly UHT milk in those tri cornered cartons (like the Jubbly ones), that where damaged, they would be designated for dumping. Being recovered and making complete boxes, these found there way into a couple of supermarkets, that already stocked UK items. This was Ď68/69.
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  #189  
Old 14th November 2019, 14:31
P.Arnold P.Arnold is offline
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Leticia

Iím on a roll, itís raining.

Anybody remember the shipís power boat being launched at the Brazilian side of the border to head to the customs post at Leticia, Colombia, walking along a jungle trail with cigarettes and whiskey, returning with documentation to head back to the ship that had transited the borders and was waiting in Peru.
Three countries in probably 3-4 hours.
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  #190  
Old 14th November 2019, 17:24
Foca Foca is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P.Arnold View Post
Iím on a roll, itís raining.

Anybody remember the shipís power boat being launched at the Brazilian side of the border to head to the customs post at Leticia, Colombia, walking along a jungle trail with cigarettes and whiskey, returning with documentation to head back to the ship that had transited the borders and was waiting in Peru.
Three countries in probably 3-4 hours.
In the 60' we used to pick up one of the "Flora" flat bottom Mississippi punts, in Belem. which had a steel attachment on the bow for the sounding pole. As Second Mate I spent days out sounding with the pilots, at low river on the "Dunstan" which had deeper draft than the "V" boats, as well as doing to Border Clearance. We used to anchor at the Cleto Anchorage....Launch the Flora in the water and off we would go up to Benjamin Constant, with the traveler( Copy of all the bills od Lading)...First stop was the Post Office with any mails and to pick up mails. Then Basilian Customs, and finally the Peruvian Consul, who always took ages to find. By now the ship had moved up and anchored off Tabatinga. We cut across a Furo which brought us out just below Ramon Castilla the Peruvian Border post were we did the same again,then across to Tabatinga and present ourself to the Military Captain in charge before rejoining the ship...All this was done with a liberal gifts of whiskey and cigarettes to oil the passing. One Second Mate missed the Furo shortcut and ended going up the Javari till their fuel ran out and had to be towed back to the ship the next day.
In the 70's the company bought fiberglass boats, which were faster and a lot more comfortable. They were used a lot in the Caribbean on beach trips as well as the Frontier clearances and sounding.
If the ship was calling at Leticia we would do the clearance whilst alongside.....looking at aerial map of the frontier now Ramon Castilla has disappeared and Leticia is more or less silted up and the pontoon is gone.
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  #191  
Old 15th November 2019, 09:42
sternchallis sternchallis is offline
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They put one of the fibre glass boats complete with outboard on the last Benedict. The OM had 4 Directors chairs attached to a plywood base as he thought if the engine was opened up we would loose two people over the stern.
We took it out in the Port of Spain anchorage and caught the recently fitted prop on a submerged cable or anchor chain and had to be towed in by a pleasure crafts Gemini.
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  #192  
Old 15th November 2019, 16:31
P.Arnold P.Arnold is offline
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Ours was the fibreglass version.
Our trip through the Ďbordersí was the one stop on a beach near Leticia, the process seemed easy with the appropriate whisky and ciggies, and donít recall Peruvian customs until we arrived at Iquitos.
As we often carried 2 or 3 passengers, it was always looked upon as an event, and there was a buffet laid on for all, as the time of the boat returning wasnít predictable.
The big concern was the possibility of striking a submerged log or debris, the stuff that had brought many a damage to big brothers prop.
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  #193  
Old 15th November 2019, 17:28
Foca Foca is offline  
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Tabatinga

Quote:
Originally Posted by P.Arnold View Post
Ours was the fibreglass version.
Our trip through the Ďbordersí was the one stop on a beach near Leticia, the process seemed easy with the appropriate whisky and ciggies, and donít recall Peruvian customs until we arrived at Iquitos.
As we often carried 2 or 3 passengers, it was always looked upon as an event, and there was a buffet laid on for all, as the time of the boat returning wasnít predictable.
The big concern was the possibility of striking a submerged log or debris, the stuff that had brought many a damage to big brothers prop.
The stop you mention on the beach near Leticia, was the Basilian Military Post at Tabatinga......easily recognized by the Red cliffs and beaches.
Ramon Castilla was just opposite quite an insignificant village. We did not stop at Leticia on all voyages, so there was no need to clear Columbian Customs
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  #194  
Old 15th November 2019, 21:00
Foca Foca is offline  
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Booth Line

My last trip on the Amazon was in 1976, on the "Clement". We did two round runs to Iquitos, with a 2/3 weeks laid up with the other "V" boats at Bush Terminal. I did one further run on the "Cyril", taking her to Trinidad back to Liverpool via Columbia. In June 1977 I joined Lamports.
Your talk about Passengers brings back a lot of memories, most trips we had the full complement of six. We carried a lot of Priests and Franciscan Monks, even a Mother Superior. We carried the Worlds leading expert on Black Plague, Dr Ed Dunlap and his wife....who was returning after a tour on the "Hope" hospital ship... a leading expert in the correction of squints. A retired Commander USN.....two young ladies who had sailed on a yacht from South Africa, and were continuing there trip of South America. American/German timber merchant and his wife who cleaned us out of jam...she ate jelly(as she called it) with every meal. The more I think about those times the more I have to laugh. Used to carry a lot of Bible Society missionary's, who used to be always concerned about all the drums of stuff they brought along with them.
I don't know if I should tell this tale...but its a long time ago.
Tommy Bowles was the second Engineer, and one night he heard a lot of banging on his bulkhead adjacent to the Chief Engineers bedroom. I was never told till afterwards that he and the Chief Steward John Lynch sat in in Johns cabin in darkness with the door ajar...and to their surprise they saw one of the Missionaries wife coming down the stairs and going into the Chiefs room... takes all sorts it certainly does.
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