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cunardbrock act2/6 and acl atlantic ships

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  #26  
Old 1st June 2007, 22:33
sparkie2182 sparkie2182 is online now  
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inconclusive to me jim................

the hair colouring is about right.......but don had a beard.
im trying to match my mental pic with your physical pic......but cant get a +ve i.d.
hopefully someone else may be able to fill in the gaps.

best regards

sparkie2182
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  #27  
Old 2nd June 2007, 18:58
Jim S Jim S is offline   SN Supporter
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Don Leitner

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inconclusive to me jim................

the hair colouring is about right.......but don had a beard.
im trying to match my mental pic with your physical pic......but cant get a +ve i.d.
hopefully someone else may be able to fill in the gaps.

best regards

sparkie2182
Thanks for your interest in trying to solve. The person I have in mind only did the one 6 month trip with Fyffes (I think) I never met him again.
Your mention of a family brewery connection seems to ring a bell but I might be just imagining it. If it is the same Don Leitner (I had written "Leibner" in some notes I made of my time at sea and when I read your Don Leitner an Australian I was puting two and two together.
The guy I have in mind was an excellent engineer and a great asset to the ship. He perhaps was a little short in patience as the following indicates -
His Junior Eng was a young lad - a good junior engineer but could be a bit cheeky. Anyway he persisted in addressing Don (if that is he) as "Abo".
This really got to him and to restore harmony I had to swop the Juniors around and take this lad on to my 4/8 watch. Peace was immediately restored and Don could continue to try to beat the C/Eng at deck tennis each morning without the aggrevation of having a cheeky Junior to deal with.

Jim
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  #28  
Old 2nd June 2007, 20:58
sparkie2182 sparkie2182 is online now  
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nice story john.........

i think the addition of a couple more gold rings on the sleeve would end any problems with juniors..........

best regards , and hoping for more info from other s.n. members


allan
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  #29  
Old 6th June 2007, 14:10
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Peter Eccleson Peter Eccleson is offline  
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ACt2/ACT6

Allan

I remember Don Hargreaves and Charlie Huddy!

I enjoyed the ACT ships too. They were good ships. Suprised they went to Blue Star eventually....which is quite nostalgic since I sailed on the Columbia Star in 1972 and America Star (on loan from R&ES to Marconi) in about 1976.

Like so many on SN I like to 'swing the lamp' occasionally and have fond memories of Cunard-Brock.
Hope life is treating you well

Regards

Pete E
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  #30  
Old 6th June 2007, 20:33
sparkie2182 sparkie2182 is online now  
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thanks peter.......

charlie was a lovely man........self contained and a real old sea dog.....ex r.n. etc: i remember he lived within sight of seaforth in glv.

don was a burnley born aussie living in marton,blackpool ...........

he was commodore 3 eng........and that was just how he planned to stay.

strange really...both the men were complete opposites in nature.......but both 100% seafarers and terrific guys to sail with.

if any other names come to mind..........send a post..........

73s peter.........

allan


qru va
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  #31  
Old 13th June 2007, 23:01
Philthechill Philthechill is offline  
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Smile Phil Roe

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Originally Posted by Derek Roger View Post
Phil ;
If you are in touch with Charlie Drought ask him if he remembers Jake Donnely and I coming up from Colombo to Tricomalee ( Sept 1968 ) to bring the Mahseer down to Colombo for repairs to generators . All the engineers were sick to some degree or other at the time and had insufficient numbers fit enough to man the vessel .
Derek
Derek! Sorry I've been absent from the site for a few days but I was away on holiday with my daughter, her bloke and my granddaughter. Whilst there my six year-old granddaughter ran me ragged and I'm just about recovered!! Anyway I digress! I DID contact Charlie (who, at this very moment, is in The Falklands as a guest of The Falklands Government, to represent The Merchant Navy, in their celebrations for Liberation Day) and asked him if he remembered you and Jake coming to Trinco to bring the Mahseer down to Colombo. He said he remembered the incident very well as he was one of the more exhausted engineers as he had been attempting to get some concentricity on one of the crankpins on one of the Ruston's (Type 5VEBZ if memory serves me correctly!). He sends his burra salaams. I'll let you know about his trip to The Falklands as soon as I get the details from him. Salaams.
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  #32  
Old 13th June 2007, 23:27
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I sailed with both 'Black' Willie Angus and Gareth Peaston on the two "C's" (Causeway and Conveyor). I don't know if Willie was the same on the ACT boats as he was on the two "C's" but he was a bag of nerves when he was on THOSE two ships! He got his 'Black' epithet 'cos he was always black as a sweep, even when he'd changed out of his playsuit into his uniform!!! Gareth and his liking for Heinz Tomato Ketchup!! Did he drown his brekkie in the aforementioned condiment on the ACT ships? He had his missis with us on one trip and she, unintentionally, 'brought the house down' when she was telling us all one night for her great love for things equine. She said, "You can't beat having a ton of heaving flesh between your legs!" when describing the joys of horse-riding and couldn't understand why all hands were suddenly gripped by an attack of snorting into their glasses of ale!! Burra salaams!!
How was your Bolo with Charlie ???
Derek
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  #33  
Old 16th June 2007, 09:34
Philthechill Philthechill is offline  
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Another "Tale from the crypt" re. "Causeway". Once again this involves "Charlie Drake". I can't recall exactly where we were but I do remember that the engine-room was an absolute picture for once. (Anyone who sailed on those ships will know what I'm talking about as, unlike the Brock ships where there was virtually unlimited staff to keep the engine-rooms pristine, the ro-ro ships had very few crew for such niceties). I think we were alongside somewhere. The only reason I think we were alongside is because of the train of events that happened i.e. all hands were soon turned-to rather than arriving in dribs and drabs as usually followed an 'Engineers Alarm' summons!!! Now follows a prodigious memory recall exercise!!!
When the off-line settling tank was being filled there was a pump cut-off system enabled by the "high-high-level" alarm. The idea of this being that if someone was pressing the settling-tank up, and had their attention diverted from doing this job, the transfer pump would automatically stop when the oil-level reached this "high-high" level. Unfortunately the alarm-buzzer had an annoying flatulent sound to it when it was enabled so any alarms, which could be triggered on a regular basis, such as high-level bilge alarms which could sound every few seconds when the ship was rolling would have a matchstick jammed in the "Alarm acknowledge" button to mute the alarm (I, of course, being an absolute pillar [pillock?] of correctness, NEVER did such a dangerous practice!!!! Ha! Right!!!). Another alarm, which would sound under rolling conditions, was the settling-tank high-levels so they, too, were usually 'frigged'. One of the features of all the transfer-pumps was that they could be run in 'Manual' which meant, naturally, that the automatic high-high level cut-off was negated.
"Charlie" was pumping one of the settling-tanks up.
For reasons unknown he was doing it manually. Matchstick cancellation facility was firmly in place.
"Charlie", whilst transferring oil, was also brushing-up on his gynaecological knowledge from some of the excellent books, on this subject, that were available from Gothenburg and was thus oblivious to the fact that (a) the settling-tank had filled and (b) the transfer pump was in 'Manual'!
The fuel pumps (to supply high-pressure oil to the burners) were on a flat above the settling tanks and had a "save-all" built round them to catch any leaks from the pump or valve-stem glands. A drain from this "save-all" led down to the settling tanks. With the transfer-pump being in 'Manual' and "Charlie" brushing-up on things gynaecological the oil from the over-filled settling-tank went UP the drain to the 'save-all' and, rapidly filling this containment area, soon spilled over the edge and gravity then entered the picture causing the oil to descend through various orifices (holes!! wake up at the back!!!!) in the plates into the engine room. Soon the entire accommodation was filled with the smell of Bunker 'C' as the oil was dripping down onto hot steam-pipes and vapourising. All hands rapidly turned-to and hurtled down below to see just what the 'kin 'ell was causing this over-powering stench. "Charlie" was, as usual, totally oblivious to this mayhem and was a bit miffed to have to put his "text-book" down. To cut this already long story short the net-result was the engine-room looked a complete mess with all the newly white-washed lagging covered in black fuel-oil. How the whole thing hadn't caught fire remains one of the mysteries of the century as there was a huge amount of vapour floating around.
I can't recall what happened to "Charlie".
Who knows he may be a top gyneacologist now as he certainly studied those books from Gothenburg with great dilligence!!! Happy (?) days! Salaams Phil

Last edited by Philthechill; 16th June 2007 at 09:56..
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  #34  
Old 16th June 2007, 15:32
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sailed on the act2 90-91 and had a great time good runs and good crowds
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  #35  
Old 17th June 2007, 03:56
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Derek! Sorry I've been absent from the site for a few days but I was away on holiday with my daughter, her bloke and my granddaughter. Whilst there my six year-old granddaughter ran me ragged and I'm just about recovered!! Anyway I digress! I DID contact Charlie (who, at this very moment, is in The Falklands as a guest of The Falklands Government, to represent The Merchant Navy, in their celebrations for Liberation Day) and asked him if he remembered you and Jake coming to Trinco to bring the Mahseer down to Colombo. He said he remembered the incident very well as he was one of the more exhausted engineers as he had been attempting to get some concentricity on one of the crankpins on one of the Ruston's (Type 5VEBZ if memory serves me correctly!). He sends his burra salaams. I'll let you know about his trip to The Falklands as soon as I get the details from him. Salaams.


Thanks Phil :
Glad Charlie is down South representing the MN in the Falklands . When he gets back get him signed up so we can have a blether .
Regards Derek
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  #36  
Old 17th June 2007, 08:28
Philthechill Philthechill is offline  
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Philthechill brought back resounding memories of that night off Anglesy. I was on ancor watch with 3rd mate Noddy Templeton when we saw the stbd engines tach go from 0 to 60 or so RPM. All hell broke loose Colin Croall started messing with the anchor control and 2nd mate Andy ? went forward. I was given the task of getting Alan Bull out of his sack after he left night order not to be disturbed. Got the biggest Bo*****king of my career trying to get him to come to the bridge. Can't really blame him when I think back, some cadet coming in and stammering that engines going full ahead sir cant stop them! As has beeen said before interesting ships.

Richard (Dick) Grenville
Dick! I've been going to reply to your recall of THAT night off Anglesey but, what with posting long yarns on "Brocks" slot and going on holiday, I've never got round to it 'cept now! It certainly was a tad traumatic wasn't it? I put in my yarn that we lost both anchors. Was this correct? I do remember they brought a replacement anchor from Bremerhaven, or somewhere, to G'burg to put on the ship. I also put that BOTH engines went into "Ahead" mode. You said that it was just the starb'd engine. I'm sure you are right but in the mayhem in the Control Room and subsequently 'on the plates' all I remember is Tony Dick, and I, furiously (not 'furiously' as in raging temper! That came later when we found out that we weren't docking in Liverpool!!!! 'Furiously' as in "high-speed"!) shutting the main steam isolating valves to the turbines. I can just imagine Allan Bull giving you a bollocking for waking him up too! Those beetling eyebrows would intimidate even the most hardened sea-dog let alone a cadet!!! Did they ever retrieve the lost anchor/anchors do you know? Salaams Phil

Last edited by Philthechill; 17th June 2007 at 08:30..
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  #37  
Old 17th June 2007, 18:28
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anyone sail on the act2 ........ act 6.......or atlantic conveyor (sadly lost in the falklands conflict.......or the atlantic causeway??????????


sparkie2182
Having watched today's great Falklands Memorial Parade in Whitehall ,on BBC TV l - I waited in vain to hear the of the great contribution that was made by the Merchant Navy and it was only when the Chinook helicopters were flying down the Mall that the commentator mentioned the helicopters which were lost on the "Atlantic Conveyor" when she sank. I suppose the Earl of Wessex dressed up as a commodore of the RFA was supposed to repesent the MN. Where were the crews of the Canberra or the QE2 should not they have been part of the parade? I think we should be told.
John Campbell [/B][/B]- I waited in vain to hear the of the great contribution that was made by the Merchant Navy and it was only when the Chinook helicopters were flying down the Mall that the commentator mentioned the helicopters which were lost on the "Atlantic Conveyor" when she sank.

I suppose the Earl of Wessex, dressed up as a commodore of the RFA, was supposed to repesent the MN. Where were the crews of the Canberra or the QE2 should not they have been part of the parade? I think we should be told.

Last edited by John Campbell; 17th June 2007 at 18:36..
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  #38  
Old 17th June 2007, 20:36
sparkie2182 sparkie2182 is online now  
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well john............

at least the RFA cadets and junior rates now someone to lookup to as a role model..............

...............a royal marines chuck out
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  #39  
Old 18th June 2007, 16:34
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Dick! I've been going to reply to your recall of THAT night off Anglesey but, what with posting long yarns on "Brocks" slot and going on holiday, I've never got round to it 'cept now! It certainly was a tad traumatic wasn't it? I put in my yarn that we lost both anchors. Was this correct? I do remember they brought a replacement anchor from Bremerhaven, or somewhere, to G'burg to put on the ship. I also put that BOTH engines went into "Ahead" mode. You said that it was just the starb'd engine. I'm sure you are right but in the mayhem in the Control Room and subsequently 'on the plates' all I remember is Tony Dick, and I, furiously (not 'furiously' as in raging temper! That came later when we found out that we weren't docking in Liverpool!!!! 'Furiously' as in "high-speed"!) shutting the main steam isolating valves to the turbines. I can just imagine Allan Bull giving you a bollocking for waking him up too! Those beetling eyebrows would intimidate even the most hardened sea-dog let alone a cadet!!! Did they ever retrieve the lost anchor/anchors do you know? Salaams Phil
You are quite correct about the anchors Phil, I seem to recall that a rather terse communication from head office took Alan Bull to task for not using anchor bouys to mark the spot where they were dropped. This was took me by suprise as I had never seen them used in the three prior years at sea. This led me to perceeve the large disconnect between the office and sea staff & in subsequent years this really did not change. Of course there was no mentrion of the fact that the engineroom staff did a stellar job of getting the engines operational just in time as we were very close to the beach with only 6 feet of water under the keel. As they say in the states "Monday morning Quarterbacking". We did get a replacement anchor in Gothemburg but I dont know if they recovered the lost ones. That ship gave me a good look at where our MN was heading I was very impressed with the Ro Ro concept and made the realization that the conventional cargo liner was doomed to go into extinction. Great to hear from you after a long time Phil

Salaams - Dick
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  #40  
Old 20th June 2007, 22:24
Philthechill Philthechill is offline  
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You are quite correct about the anchors Phil, I seem to recall that a rather terse communication from head office took Alan Bull to task for not using anchor bouys to mark the spot where they were dropped. This was took me by suprise as I had never seen them used in the three prior years at sea. This led me to perceeve the large disconnect between the office and sea staff & in subsequent years this really did not change. Of course there was no mentrion of the fact that the engineroom staff did a stellar job of getting the engines operational just in time as we were very close to the beach with only 6 feet of water under the keel. As they say in the states "Monday morning Quarterbacking". We did get a replacement anchor in Gothemburg but I dont know if they recovered the lost ones. That ship gave me a good look at where our MN was heading I was very impressed with the Ro Ro concept and made the realization that the conventional cargo liner was doomed to go into extinction. Great to hear from you after a long time Phil

Salaams - Dick
Dick! Burra salaams! Strangely enough, and finding out about it now, after all these years, I didn't know we were so close to disaster!! Probably just as well I didn't know then as, rather than buggering-about in the engine-room trying to get some order out of the chaos, I would have been perched in one of the lifeboats disguised as a woman or a child!!! For the office to bollock "Bully" for not dropping marker buoys, where the anchors had been lost, shows exactly how out-of-touch shore-side people could be!! For a start nobody would have had the faintest idea WHERE they were to the nearest 200 yards, would they, and to think of such niceties when all hell was breaking loose would have been a luxury you would only see in the movies!! Cheers! Phil
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  #41  
Old 28th June 2007, 18:31
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Hi Phil, just remembered one of my c**k ups while we sailed together. There was an AB from Liverpool called Mackanernie, (every one called him Mac), who was on the 8 - 12 watch with us. He was a real character with lots of scouse stories that kept me in stitches. He told me one night about his brother who was a Liverpool docker, they all supposedly had nick names and his brother was called "The Astronaught". He frequently looked over the hatch coaming and shouted to his mates, "I'm just going home to mars"!

Any way Colin Croal (Mate) asked me to do a crew check befor leaving Grennock I came back to him in a panic ssaying that I had found all the guys with the exception of Ernie. Ernie who he asked, you know I said Macs buddy Ernie. All had a good laugh courtesy of the cadet.

Burra Salaams

Dick Grenville
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  #42  
Old 29th June 2007, 11:45
Philthechill Philthechill is offline  
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Thumbs up Truth is stranger than fiction!!!

How's about this for proof of the "Title" to this reply Dick. Several years ago (and long after I'd come ashore) I was in my local having a tincture or twelve and I got talking to a bloke who I'd seen in the boozer but never spoken to before. As soon as he opened his mouth a very strong scouse accent came to the fore and I mentioned that I'd been with a Liverpool company when I was at sea. He said the only member of his family to go to sea was his uncle. He then said something to the effect of "Perhaps you knew him" ( I was thinking, "Yeh right! The number of blokes who went to sea from Liverpool and this bloke thinks I may have known his uncle------------dream on pal!").Out loud I was polite however and said "Possibly, what was his name?" Much to my great surprise he said, "Macnernie". "Good God!", spake I, "I knew him well! He used to be on the "Atlantic Causeway". The guy who I was speaking to (John Atkinson was his name) has a son who I see fairly frequently and he told me last year that Macnernie had died. He also asked me if I had any photographs of his great uncle Mac taken on board Causeway but, unfortunately, I don't have. I may put an appeal on this thread and see if anyone DOES have any photo's of him. What do you think, Dick, would it maybe yield something? Salaams, Phil
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  #43  
Old 29th June 2007, 22:02
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That was truly remarkable Phil, what a small world we live in. You never know your luck by asking. I wish I had taken more pictures when I was sailing the old grey matter has a hard time remembering things!

Cheers for now

DG
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  #44  
Old 3rd July 2007, 15:23
Philthechill Philthechill is offline  
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Smile Air belt round the ships.

I have often wondered if that air-belt that was fitted round "Causeway's" hull and maybe "Conveyor's" actually did what it was supposed to do and save fuel. I left "The Merch" in 1975 and the experiment was still on-going so I never did find out if it was any good. I know when the Howden compressor, which was fitted under the foc'sle head, and supplied the air to be pumped through the perforations in the canvas belt round the hull, was fired-up the current draw was absolutely monumental and I think we used to have both turbo-alternators "on-line" to cope with well over 3 thousand amps starting current. We used to gaze at the ammeter with the sort of fascination a rabbit has when it's got a cobra about to marmalize it! The old bowels would feel a bit loose as we waited for the whole nine-yards to trip. Strangely enough they never did so our half-crown/sixpence feeling was absolutely without foundation!!! So if anyone can fill me in as to whether it was any good, or not, I would be "reet pleased" as they would say in this 'ere neck-of-the-woods!! Salaams Phil Roe
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  #45  
Old 4th July 2007, 07:53
Philthechill Philthechill is offline  
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Thumbs down Heart-sinking sight!

One of the heart-sinking sights (amongst many!) for engineers rejoining "Causeway" or "Conveyor", as you got your first glimpse of the ship as you arrived at Seaforth in your taxi, would be a plume of steam coming from the top of the funnel as you knew that the ship was "on atmosphere", the job was shut down and you would have to turn-to as soon as you'd relieved your opposite number and got your playsuit on. Obviously you would have to turn-to, if she was flashed-up and ready to go, if you arrived on your watch but if she was shut-down it meant having to do urgent maintenance. One of the really crap jobs was repacking the de-superheating valves as any ex-ACL engineer will tell you. The stuffing-box was about three-inches deep, which is not too bad. However the packing used was Walkers "Supeta" and was one eighth-of-an-inch square!! Because of their location these valves got extremely hot and consequently the "Supeta" packing which, in its unused form was beautifully soft and greasy as it was full of graphite, took on the consistency of cast steel! Trying to get the old packing out, to replace, it was an absolute bugger of a job and not many (if any!!) engineers could honestly say that they had got every turn of old packing out being, usually, content to get the first two or three turns out and then repack the gland with new "Supeta". Many an engineer was spotted lurking behind stacked containers on the jetty, reluctant to board, when they'd seen that tell-tale steam-plume issuing forth from the funnel! Was I ever one of them? Oh puhlease!! As if!!!! Salaams Phil Roe
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  #46  
Old 13th July 2007, 21:48
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Act 2,3 and 6.

Hi all.
I was lucky enough to spend about three years doing the 'PACE' runs on these three ships. Also across the atlantic on the smaller atlantic project. (rolled like a pig) Was due to join the causeway as 3rd mate to do the coastal and she was redirected to go to the south atlantic. Didnt get to go.
Anybody remeber John Oscroft and what thappened to MHCTwomey?
Got on great with both.
Martin Medland
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  #47  
Old 13th July 2007, 23:51
sparkie2182 sparkie2182 is online now  
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hi martin..........

i believe capt oscroft is now retired and living near kendal.......in the lake district.have you joined the yahoo group "vintage port"?
it is a very well supported group.........and all your mates are there.........

best regards........

sparkie2182

ex cunardbrock
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  #48  
Old 14th July 2007, 21:10
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Thanks Sparkie. I am awaiting info to see if Im allowed into the club! Thanks for the info and update on John.
Martin.
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  #49  
Old 15th July 2007, 16:29
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Atlantic's Causeway & Conveyor

Will take me ages to read all the responses oin this thread. I too stood by the build of both vessels at Wallsend, sailed on voyage 2 of the Causeway then returned to the yard for the Conveyor where I remained as S/2/0 until summer 1971. I completed 9 contracts on the Conveyor mainly with Captain Des Landes as Master but latterly Alan Bull. John Cooper was C/O almost the whole time, Alex McLeod, Purser and my memory is very poor regarding all the others. I left to go for Masters in the autum of 1971 and following this joined Esso Marine UK.

Have been trying unsuccessfully to upload photos of both vessels on the site

Brgds

Chris Allport
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  #50  
Old 23rd July 2007, 20:51
Philthechill Philthechill is offline  
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Thumbs up Jack McGuire.

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Will take me ages to read all the responses oin this thread. I too stood by the build of both vessels at Wallsend, sailed on voyage 2 of the Causeway then returned to the yard for the Conveyor where I remained as S/2/0 until summer 1971. I completed 9 contracts on the Conveyor mainly with Captain Des Landes as Master but latterly Alan Bull. John Cooper was C/O almost the whole time, Alex McLeod, Purser and my memory is very poor regarding all the others. I left to go for Masters in the autum of 1971 and following this joined Esso Marine UK.

Have been trying unsuccessfully to upload photos of both vessels on the site

Brgds

Chris Allport
Chris! Phil Roe. Do you remember the day, on "Conveyor", when she was fitting-out, Jack McGuire probably saved the life of one of the shore-side "leccies" who was doing some work under the bridge console? Jack was up on the bridge and noticed this blokes leg, sticking-out from under the console, was twitching quite violently and realised that he was being electrocuted so, without any thought for his own safety, grabbed hold of the guy's overalls and dragged him out. Turned-out the bloke had brushed against a bare, live, wire but, because he was then "in spasm", couldn't get himself away from the said live wire but fortunately, for him, Jack was there. Salaams, Phil
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