Five masted schooner CITY OF PORTLAND - Page 2 - Ships Nostalgia
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Five masted schooner CITY OF PORTLAND

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  #26  
Old 7th January 2020, 16:28
stein stein is online now  
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We seem to have aggreed without me noticing it then. I am perhaps a bt dyslectic when there is no illustration present. What souvenir issue of the shipbuilder? I have got the one on Mauretania and the one on Aquitania (somewhere).

Here is a page from John H. Ladage: "Merchant ships: a pictorial study" Cambridge, Maryland 1955.
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File Type: jpg !!!!aabbssuiugty.jpg (112.2 KB, 12 views)

Last edited by stein; 7th January 2020 at 17:39..
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  #27  
Old 7th January 2020, 16:51
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Stephen J. Card Stephen J. Card is offline  
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Hi Stein,

I can't read my Shipbuilders right now. I am in North Atlantic at the moment, m.s. Spirit of Discovery on passage from Bermuda to Southampton. I'll dig for them as soon as I get back.

Back to definitions. I find that definitions for 'parts of ship' are sometimes incorrectly names... compared to old books as in 'merchant ship construction'. A bit like calling a ship 'it' instead of 'she'. Grrrrrr!

Did you find the photos I attached to No. 25?

Just in case.... All Best Wishes for the NEW YEAR!

Stephen
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  #28  
Old 7th January 2020, 17:37
stein stein is online now  
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Yes, thank you, I found them, and they are instructive. And a Happy New Year to you as well. And do have a good trip!

Last edited by stein; 7th January 2020 at 19:00..
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  #29  
Old 7th January 2020, 18:13
stein stein is online now  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Strickylad44 View Post
What kind of stern is this ? >
"A ducktail sponson is added to the stern of a vessel to increase waterline, add buoyancy and improve water flow." I read on the net. In addition, it shifts the longitudinal center of buoyancy aft reducing dynamic squat, and reduces pitch motion due to increased longitudinal moment of inertia, it is claimed. By those who perform this plastic operation on old hulls. It still looks odd to me, but I am not a naval architect, or even a cruise ship aficionado - I did not even know this was the ex Stockholm...

And by the way, what will you call the stern of a modern "block of flats" cruise ship? "A square cut off transom with a sponson ducktail underneath"?

Last edited by stein; 7th January 2020 at 19:45..
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  #30  
Old 7th January 2020, 18:59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stein View Post
"A ducktail sponson is added to the stern of a vessel to increase waterline, add buoyancy and improve water flow." I read on the net. In addition, it shifts the longitudinal center of buoyancy aft reducing dynamic squat, and reduces pitch motion due to increased longitudinal moment of inertia, it is claimed. By those who perform this plastic operation on old hulls. It still looks odd to me, but I am not a naval architect, or even a cruise ship aficionada - I did not even know this was the ex Stockholm...

And by the way, what will you call the stern of a modern "block of flats" cruise ship? "A square cut off transom with a sponson ducktail underneath"?

That is exactly what it is, but is usually called " a damn ugly boat".

Sad that STOCKHOLM her lost good looks.
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  #31  
Old 7th January 2020, 19:51
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STERN OF LUSITANIA (Similar MAURETANIA and AQUITANIA)

"Lusitania .. The admiralty demanded certain design choices, such as mandating the rudder be entirely below the waterline so it was not vulnerable to gunfire. Because of this, all of her steering machinery also had to be below the waterline, making it more difficult and expensive to maintain."


This is what is about, the combination of cruiser stern with counter above. 'combined function and style'. Rather beautiful too!


Stephen
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  #32  
Old 9th January 2020, 16:25
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Just found this. A great informative thread - thanks all.

JJ.
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  #33  
Old 10th January 2020, 03:08
aussiesparks aussiesparks is offline  
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As the timber was destined for Port Pirie in South Australia it would suggest that it was a cargo of pit props for the mining industry which was large in that area and still is. There would not have been much furniture building but the timber may also have been used for house building.
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  #34  
Old 10th January 2020, 05:43
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I would have thought that Australia would be well endowed with pit prop timber from the vast forests of eucalyptus trees that seem to thrive over much of the land.
Years ago before reinforced concrete or lattice steel structures became common place for power line transmission poles the port of Coffs Harbour in northern NSW was a big exporter of gum trees for the power industry and the Union co owned a specially built ship with a single very long hatch to carry same.
The ship was the Tauranga if I recall correctly.
In recent times I have driven inland near Coffs and have seen the vast man planted forests of huge gums as straight as a dye and reaching for the sky and no longer in demand as before.

Bob

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